Dec 08, 2022  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Social Sciences

  
  •  

    SS 455 - International Relations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject provides basic information concerning international relationships. Topics covered are foreign policy, national security, alliances, theories of war, the balance of power, the balance of terror, international law, and diplomacy. Features of Russian, Chinese, U.S., U.S. Allies and Developing World foreign policies and internal principles are examined. The student is encouraged to relate theoretical principles discussed with current developments in the international arena. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Articulate world-wide points of view on international events
    • Describe power structures in the world and the dynamics changes possible in these structures
    • Describe the dimensions of domestic events in an increasingly interdependent world
    • Articulate a broad perspective to assist them in becoming a more responsible world citizen

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • International politics
    • Power and influence
    • National interest
    • Foreign policy
    • Causes of war
    • Balance of power
    • Types of war
    • Balance of terror
    • U.S. foreign policy
    • Soviet foreign policy
    • European foreign policy
    • Japanese foreign policy
    • Chinese foreign policy
    • The Developing World
    • International order
    • International law
    • Diplomacy

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
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    SS 456 - Public Policy in Urban America

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the influences upon and consequences of federal and local decision making in shaping the spatial and demographic characteristics of urban areas in the 21st century. The course also examines the effects of land use, transportation, community development, and housing policies upon the evolution of metropolitan areas, the increasing racial and economic segregation that has resulted from these policies, the relationship of these policies to the growth of crime and welfare, and the deterioration of urban education systems. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze the forces that shape and define the city (City of Milwaukee will be used as example)
    • Examine policies and laws that define where buildings are built, how monies are raised and spent, and the way citizens live and work
    • Analyze the policies of taxation, land use, community development, housing, and stadium development

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The nature of the city
    • City finance
    • City building
    • Land use policies
    • Urban transportation
    • Education reform
    • Welfare reform
    • Effects of immigration
    • Stadium development

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
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    SS 457 - Current Affairs

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to encourage students to keep themselves informed about problems at the local, national, and international levels and to develop a critical attitude toward those problems. Discussions of stories in the news, both in magazines and newspapers, and on radio and television, will help to complement material in the text. Students are expected to express their ideas orally (through both individual classroom contributions and through formal panels), and in writing. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the causes and contexts of local, national, and international events
    • Exhibit critical thinking regarding current affairs
    • Develop and articulate informed opinions concerning current events and express them in verbal and written form
    • Exhibit characteristics of a well-informed, alert citizen and professional
    • Apply knowledge of technical matters into local, national and world communication systems
    • Strive constantly to broaden knowledge in many fields with respect to the past, present and future
    • Describe the forces that drive events in the international arena

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Europe
    • Commonwealth of Independent States
    • The Middle East
    • Asia
    • Africa
    • South America
    • Mexico and Central America
    • Canada
    • United States

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
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    SS 458 - Contemporary European Society

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a study of the development of European political ideologies during the Modern Age and the various European nations that have adopted and developed those ideologies. Of particular concern are the ideologies of liberalism, socialism, and fascism. The course will also examine the development of the European Union since World War II, and the political and economic integration of Europe. The course will be historical in that it will examine those past phenomena that were important to the development of European ideologies and governmental institutions. The course will also focus upon contemporary issues facing Europe today. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the origins of European political thought
    • Explain how liberal democracy and free-market capitalism have become manifest in contemporary Europe
    • Describe the current challenges that the creation of the European Union poses for various European nations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
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    SS 459H - Rethinking Cuba

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will introduce students to the ways that politics, architecture and urban planning, and international development strategies have worked to create present-day Cuba, with an emphasis on how the relationships between such influences on the country’s evolution can be rethought following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Irma. How should Cuba rebuild following this natural disaster - and what ideas should inform this rebuilding process?  This course includes a required servant-leadership trip to Cuba, during which students will put into practice concepts discussed in the classroom. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Synthesize and analyze the power of place within the context of Cuba
    • Describe the fields of political science, architecture and urban planning, and international development - and how they operate in Cuba
    • Exhibit an understanding, through a hands-on project, of how redevelopment works in Cuba
    • Practice the tenets of servant-leadership in Cuba

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
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    SS 460 - Foundations of Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of the diverse discipline of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, and the applications gained from this knowledge. The course emphasizes the fundamental methods and theories in psychology, the historical development of the field, and current research and applications. Topics of discussion include personality theories and human development, emotions and motivation, learning and memory, cognition and perception, psychopathology, and social psychology. Through this course the student should gain an increased understanding of the field of psychology, an enhanced ability to think critically, and the ability to apply psychological principles to everyday life. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain basic knowledge of the major theories and principles of psychology
    • Have an understanding of and apply the principles of psychological inquiry to one’s own mental processes and behavior, and that of others
    • Articulate a greater understanding and appreciation of, and respect for, human diversity
    • Exhibit a greater understanding of how biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural influences impact human behavior and mental processes
    • Critically evaluate current issues in the field of psychology
    • Demonstrate an understanding of psychological information through written and oral communication skills

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Thinking critically with psychology
    • Biology and behavior
    • The developing person
    • Learning
    • Memory
    • Thinking, language, and intelligence
    • Motivation
    • Emotions, stress, and health
    • Personality
    • Psychological disorders
    • Therapy
    • Social psychology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lauren Beverung
  
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    SS 460H - Foundations of Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of the diverse discipline of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, and the applications gained from this knowledge. The course emphasizes the fundamental methods and theories in psychology, the historical development of the field, and current research and applications. Topics of discussion include personality theories and human development, emotions and motivation, learning and memory, cognition and perception, psychopathology, and social psychology. The course will also address the impact of the built environment on both individual and communal behavior.  Through this course the student should gain an increased understanding of the field of psychology, an enhanced ability to think critically, and the ability to apply psychological principles to everyday life.   (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain basic knowledge of the major theories and principles of psychology
    • Have an understanding of and apply the principles of psychological inquiry to one’s own mental processes and behavior, and that of others
    • Articulate a greater understanding and appreciation of, and respect for, human diversity
    • Exhibit a greater understanding of how biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural influences impact human behavior and mental processes
    • Critically evaluate current issues in the field of psychology
    • Demonstrate an understanding of psychological information through written and oral communication skills
    • Synthesize and analyze the power of place as it pertains to psychology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Thinking critically with psychology
    • Biology and behavior
    • The developing person
    • Learning
    • Memory
    • Thinking, language, and intelligence
    • Motivation
    • Emotions, stress, and health
    • Personality
    • Psychological disorders
    • Therapy
    • Social psychology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lauren Beverung
  
  •  

    SS 461 - Organizational Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to show the application of psychological aspects of managerial processes such as motivation, group processes, conflict resolution, working conditions, and organizational structure and their influences on job satisfaction. Basic research methodology principles are discussed to help students become critical thinkers and to understand potential biases in research. Current trends and issues such as downsizing, quality, market globalization, and diversity are emphasized throughout the course.  (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Articulate the factors involved in personnel selection and general research methodology principles as applied to the workplace
    • Describe some of the factors that impact organizational effectiveness
    • Explain the general principles of job satisfaction and motivation
    • Describe the scientific context within which industrial/organizational psychology exists
    • Further develop their knowledge of scientific methodology and exercise of critical thinking
    • Articulate the fundamental concepts of the behavioral sciences as applied in the workplace

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction: definitions and history of organizational psychology
    • Research methods
    • Organizational structure, culture and development
    • Motivation
    • Job satisfaction, and quality of work life
    • Work conditions and work safety
    • Communication in the workplace
    • Group processes in work organizations
    • Videos
    • Influence, power and politics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 462 - Developmental Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course surveys human development for the entire lifespan beginning with prenatal development. Major theories, research, and issues related to biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial growth are examined and the interplay of these three domains is considered. Emphasis is placed on understanding the student’s own developmental past, present, and future. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the life span as an ongoing developmental process, or set of processes, involving both continuity and change, by giving examples from the literature, including physical, social, cognitive, and personality development
    • Analyze different developmental events from the perspectives of major theories of development: probabilistic epigenesis, dynamic systems theory, cognitive, sociocultural, social-learning, ecological, and recognize those theories when used by others to analyze events
    • Explain how research contributes to the understanding of development and to evaluate and use research findings appropriately
    • Recall important development concepts, and be able to recognize and apply these concepts in various situations
    • Formulate relevant questions about developmental processes and events and use standardized techniques for gathering objective answers to these questions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 463 - Psychology of Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will introduce students to concepts of psychology and their application to digital design. Students will learn the basics of cognitive psychology, including concepts of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, reasoning, reading, and decision making. Students will also be introduced to some social aspects of digital behaviors, including persuasion, fear, motivation, and needs. The course will culminate in a final project or report where students demonstrate their understanding of design psychology. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of human-centered design to create and/or improve culturally appropriate products, services, and environments
    • Apply psychological principles to digital design 
    • Analyze a digital design or topic through the lens of design psychology
    • Explain theories of visual perception including the bottom-up and top-down theories
    • Identify how humans process information
    • Describe the processes of memory, including encoding, storage, and retrieval
    • Identify types of problems and obstacles, and understand how how to solve them 
    • Explain how and why persuasion and social influence work to change behavior

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Perception, vision and how users interact with their environment
    • The impact of attention and memory on digital design
    • How humans learn to read and the impact on copy design
    • Learning, problem solving, and the paralysis of choice
    • Persuasion, fear, and social influence on digital behaviors

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 464 - Human Factors in Engineering and Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the concept of the human, systems, and environmental interaction. Emphasis is on the human aspect of human-machine systems to make the student more aware of the human element in the design of equipment and work. Human sensory, psychological and biomechanical processes are examined, indicating the role they play in the design and application of controls, tools and displays. The effects of illumination, noise, information processing, stress, fatigue, and boredom on human beings are also examined. The student will be expected to research and make several presentations on areas of human factors. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the human aspect of the human-machine system
    • Describe the sensory-motor processes of people
    • Explain information theory and processing
    • Explain various types of display panels, their functions and usefulness
    • Understand and articulate the role of information feedback in motor performance
    • Explain various types of controls, their functions and usefulness
    • Describe the effects of light, color, noise, and temperature on people
    • Describe the effects of motivation, stress, fatigue, and boredom on productivity and work
    • Explain anthropometrics data and its use in design of the work environment
    • Explain the function and dysfunction of the central nervous system with regard to injury

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Human-Machine system
    • Information processing, information theory, factors influencing information processing; noise, timesharing, redundancy, speed and load, compatibility; requirements for memory; decision-making
    • Characteristics of visual sensory channel and displays; physiology of the eye, what affects perception, characteristics of quantitative, qualitative, alpha-numeric, and symbolic displays. Auditory and kinesthetic displays also presented
    • The nature and effects of activities on the human system; stress and strain of work; motor learning fatigue; boredom; practical applications for designers and management
    • Characteristics of noise and its effects on work and the body
    • Biological rhythms and their effects on productivity and work design
    • Anthropometrics data and its use in design; work space dimension, product design, and science of seating
    • Hand tool design and biomechanical effects of work with hand tools; carpal tunnel syndrome, white finger, etc.; John Bennett design of tools
    • Environmental psychology: personal space; office design

    Laboratory Topics
    • Lab reports: consistent with requirements as assigned

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 465 - Cognitive Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Have you ever wondered: What is the mind?  How has it evolved?  How does it change over the lifespan?  How does it manage the extraordinary achievements of day-to-day living? What happens when something in the mind goes wrong? The science of Cognitive Psychology answers these questions by exploring how the human mind processes information.  Some major topics in this class include: perception, attention, memory, imagery, language, problem solving, and decision making.  This course examines some of the basic theories about what makes the human mind special, and why we think the way we do.     (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a model for how the human mind works, from lower- to higher-level processes
    • Critically evaluate the major theories of human cognition
    • Interpret and critique research findings as they relate to cognitive theories and the real world
    • Demonstrate metacognitive skills through traditional book learning and through practice and reflection

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lauren Beverung
  
  •  

    SS 466 - Abnormal Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to involve students in the subject matter of abnormal psychology and to assist them in achieving an integrated view of current knowledge about deviant behavior. Particular attention is given to understanding the theories that address why such behavior occurs. Therapeutic interventions are also explored. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Clarify the distinction between maladaptive and adaptive functioning
    • Present an integrated view of potential causes of ineffective coping patterns
    • Describe various intervention strategies and their theoretical bases
    • Consider their own lives and the means to foster healthier personal growth and development
    • Describe the moral, ethical, and subjective issues in the field of psychology
    • Articulate the responsibility and influence they have personally and professionally to impact changes related to mental problems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Abnormal psychology overview (definitions, trends assessment, and diagnoses)
    • Psychological models of abnormal behavior
    • Generalized anxiety disorder and phobias
    • Panic, obsessive-compulsive and stress disorders
    • Mood disorders and gender identity
    • Suicide
    • Sexual disorder and gender identity
    • Eating disorders
    • Schizophrenia
    • Disorders of memory and other cognitive functions
    • Disorders of childhood and old age
    • Personality disorders
    • Law, society, and the mental health profession

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jan Fertig
  
  •  

    SS 467 - Social Psychology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of the diverse and rapidly changing field of social psychology. Social psychology can be defined as “the scientific field that seeks to understand the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations.” (Baron & Byrne, Social Psychology). It has often been called the “psychology of the normal person.” By studying social psychology, we can become more aware of how and why we behave, think, and feel as we do in situations involving others. The course emphasizes social psychology’s fundamental areas and methods of study, as well as its applications. Specific areas of investigation include social cognition and perception, attitudes, social identity, the self, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, and group dynamics. Through this course, the student should gain an enhanced understanding of how the findings of psychology apply to everyday life. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain basic knowledge of the major theories and principles of social psychology
    • Articulate a greater understanding of how social situations shape the individual’s perceptions of and attitudes toward self and others, as well as one’s interactions with others
    • Critically evaluate current issues in the field of social psychology
    • Demonstrate an understanding of social psychological information through written and oral communication
    • Demonstrate an understanding of and apply the principles of social psychological inquiry to one’s own mental processes and to that of others
    • Gain a greater understanding and appreciation of, and respect for, human diversity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The field of social psychology
    • Social perception and social cognition
    • Attitudes
    • The self
    • Prejudice
    • Interpersonal attraction and close relationships
    • Social influence
    • Prosocial (helping) behavior
    • Aggression
    • Groups and individuals

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jan Fertig
  
  •  

    SS 471 - Sociology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The goal of this course is to develop students’ awareness of the relationship between larger social forces and personal experience. Specific areas of focus include social organization, culture, socialization, family, stratification of societies, deviance, social movements, and social issues. Through this course, the student should gain an increased understanding of the field of sociology, an enhanced ability to think critically, and the ability to apply sociological principles to everyday life. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the key concepts of sociology and the critical changes taking place in the culture
    • Demonstrate a motivation to work toward greater sociological understanding through application of sociological principles
    • Demonstrate an increasing objectivity and openness toward the needs of society as a whole, understanding the determinants of social behavior and development of individual ability to make more appropriate decisions consistent with his/her changing roles in society

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Developing a sociological consciousness
    • Culture and social structure
    • Socialization
    • Social groups and formal organization
    • Religion and education
    • The family
    • Male and female roles
    • Social stratification
    • Deviance

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jan Fertig
  
  •  

    SS 472 - Social Problems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course helps to make the student aware of the problems and challenges of our modern times. Included are problems associated with the family, physical and mental health, poverty, ethnic and race relations, gender and age inequality, drugs, crime, and environmental concerns. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe some of the factors contributing to the health care problems in the United States
    • Articulate many of the problems that the family can experience such as divorce, child abuse, and others
    • Explain several reasons for poverty in the United States and around the world
    • Demonstrate an understanding of aging and sexism
    • Identify some of the factors contributing to criminal behavior
    • Distinguish between fact and myth regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the world’s arms race and nuclear war
    • Demonstrate a personal willingness to involve themselves actively and intelligently in the social issues of the day
    • Apply knowledge of social problems to become a better equipped professional and to contribute to the fullest extent possible to the technical and social solutions of the problems of tomorrow

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The sociological approach to social problems
    • Physical and mental health
    • The changing family
    • Sex and social norms
    • Sex roles and inequality
    • Prejudice and discrimination
    • Poverty and affluence
    • Aging
    • Crime
    • War and nuclear war
    • Environment

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jan Fertig
  
  •  

    SS 473 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to assist the student in becoming a better world citizen through cultural understanding. By uncovering the sources, forces, and factors that form societies, the student will develop a deeper appreciation for, and a clearer understanding of, the rich cultural diversity of our world. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of what it means to be human
    • Explain that cultural differences may have roots in physical and social environments
    • Demonstrate tolerance and understanding of other peoples and their ways

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • What is anthropology?
    • The concepts of culture
    • Various schools of thought in cultural anthropology
    • Evolution
    • Language of culture
    • Food getting
    • Economic systems
    • Social stratification
    • Sex and culture
    • Marriage and the family
    • Ethnographics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  •  

    SS 473H - Cultural Anthropology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to assist the student in becoming a better world citizen through cultural understanding. By uncovering the sources, forces, and factors that form societies, the student will develop a deeper appreciation for, and a clearer understanding of, the rich cultural diversity of our world.  The course will analyze the relationship between place/land and the individuals living in that area.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of what it means to be human
    • Explain that cultural differences may have roots in physical and social environments
    • Demonstrate tolerance and understanding of other peoples and their ways
    • Synthesize and analyze the power of place through the lens of cultural anthropology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • What is anthropology?
    • The concepts of culture
    • Various schools of thought in cultural anthropology
    • Evolution
    • Language of culture
    • Food getting
    • Economic systems
    • Social stratification
    • Sex and culture
    • Marriage and the family
    • Ethnographics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  •  

    SS 474 - The Family

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide the student with insight into the American family system and give the student the tools with which to make informed decisions about his/her future with respect to family and intimate relationships. Issues addressed in this course include gender, love, courtship, sexuality, diverse family forms, communication, parenting, work, family violence, uncoupling, and remarriage. Attention is also given to families of diverse cultures and nations. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of, and an ability to, apply major theories informing contemporary scholarship of marriage and family
    • Display comprehension of current and historical trends affecting marriage and family (mainly among North American families)
    • Provide evidence of a greater understanding of, appreciation of, and respect for human diversity
    • Exhibit insight into the ways in which larger social, political, and economic forces as well as biological and psychological forces impact relationships within the family
    • Show an increasing objectivity and openness toward the needs of society as a whole, including an improved grasp of the determinants of social behavior; and an enhanced capacity to make decisions consistent with his/her changing roles in society

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • What is family? A historical perspective of the family
    • Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins by Stone-family legacies
    • Theories about the family
    • Families in modern society
    • The explosive 1960s; The 1970s: Scarcity, and “The Me Decade”
    • The family as a haven in a heartless society
    • Class, race, and culture in the American family
    • Sex and gender
    • The ultimate human connection: The love relationship
    • Divorce and remarriage
    • Single mothers-child care
    • Parenthood

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lauren Beverung
  
  •  

    SS 475 - Addictions and Compulsions

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to various causes, consequences, and treatments of compulsive and addictive behaviors. Included are drug and alcohol-related issues and compulsive behaviors that do not involve substances. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify various causes of alcoholism, chemical dependency, and compulsive behaviors
    • Objectively define and evaluate behavior regarding chemical substance and other addictions
    • Address the consequences of chemical dependency and alcoholism
    • Foster understanding of the differences between use and abuse of substances
    • Identify treatment procedures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Terminology
    • Origins, effects, medical use and history of individual drugs
    • Personality and drug use
    • Alcohol and the body
    • The sociocultural context of drug use
    • Comparison of etiologies regarding substance abuse
    • Adolescent development and substance abuse
    • College populations and drinking
    • Adult children of alcoholics
    • Co-dependency
    • Treatment approaches
    • Gambling
    • Eating disorders

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jan Fertig
  
  •  

    SS 476 - Death and Dying

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Death and dying are universal human events. This course considers how individuals and societies develop ways of coping with death on a personal and on a societal level. Additional areas of focus include health care decisions, grief, suicide, homicide, and terrorism. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify their attitudes regarding death and dying
    • Develop and articulate an awareness regarding anticipatory loss and grief
    • Analyze society’s decisions regarding terminal care and health care resource allocation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Attitudes toward death
    • Pattern of death and dying: then and now displacement of death from the home
    • Expressions of attitudes toward death: language, humor, mass media, music, literature, visual arts
    • Pioneers in death studies: The rise of death education, the response to AIDS
    • Perspectives on death: cross cultural and historical death in early and traditional cultures, death and dying in western culture; four cultural case studies: Native American, African American, Mexican American and Japanese American traditions
    • Terminal illness-pain and suffering reactions of the terminally ill, family reactions, grief: the reaction to loss, hospice
    • Knowing when to stop: a cross-cultural perspective to the funeral ritual, what is a living will? Power of attorney
    • Guest speaker-oncologist’s perspective
    • Guest speaker-nurse clinician
    • It is important to talk about the end of life
    • Guest speaker-the perspective of a medical ethicist
    • Guest speaker-the perspective of the clergy
    • Guests-families who have lost children
    • Guest-the problem of trauma-induced stress
    • Guest-the perspective of a funeral director and mortician

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lauren Beverung
  
  •  

    SS 477 - Adaptive Reuse and Tactical Urbanism in the 21st Century City

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
     This course will introduce students to the ways that adaptive reuse-the renovation and reuse of pre-existing structures for new purposes-and tactical urbanism-a city, organizational, and/or citizen-led approach to neighborhood building using short-term, low-cost, and scalable interventions to catalyze long-term change-can be employed to address these landscapes of abandonment. Both adaptive reuse and tactical urbanism provide tools to transform buildings designed for the industrial age into structures that can speak to the concerns of the twenty-first century city. Such tools are particularly useful for young professionals, like engineers, who will be charged to rebuild America’s cities and revitalize the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the concepts of adaptive reuse and tactical urbanism as practiced in cities around the world
    • Describe the history that the concepts of adaptive reuse and tactical urbanism are meant to address
    • Critically reflect on the promise and potential pitfalls of adaptive reuse and tactical urbanism
    • Apply the tenets of adaptive reuse and tactical urbanism to a class-based servant-leadership project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Adaptive reuse
    • Tactical urbanism
    • Modern urban planning
    • Modern architecture
    • Landscape architecture
    • Creative placemaking
    • Servant-leadership

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  •  

    SS 492 - Instructional Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course acquaints the student with various learning styles, teaching styles and instructional methods. Time is devoted to the fundamentals and mechanics of classroom management, visual aids, assignments, evaluation techniques, course preparation and provision for individual differences in the classroom. Activities include lectures, discussion groups, group projects, student presentations, and outside reading. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , GS 1003  or GS 1030H , and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply learning theories to design course content, instructional strategies, and assessment tasks
    • Describe contemporary practices of instructional design in a variety of settings, including business, industry, government, and classroom education
    • Write effective, measurable learning objectives
    • Design assessments based on desired outcomes
    • Map strategies for learning activities that link to outcomes
    • Critically evaluate tools and methods
    • Create media-rich educational content

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Instructional design foundations
    • Analysis of learning environments
    • Learning management systems
    • Design of a learning environment
    • Implementation strategies
    • Evaluation techniques

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    SS 495 - Social Science Selected Studies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers timely topics in the social sciences or specialized subjects that reflect the expertise/interest of current Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department faculty. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies by course

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Varies by course

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This selection allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual study, literature survey, analysis, design or laboratory study.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determined by instructor for each student

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    SS 3630 - Design Thinking

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the foundations of design thinking as a human-centered approach to solving complex problems.  Design thinking is approached as a methodology that drives innovation and creativity across diverse fields: from user experience, business, to engineering and beyond. The course draws on the design thinking theory and best practices. Additionally, students learn about design thinking approaches adopted by top technology and business companies, healthcare providers, social innovation, and hospitality services.  The course emphasizes leveraging the designing thinking framework for problems with a significant human element to them.  Course projects provide students with hands-on experience of how to apply the design thinking process, tools, and methods in the discovery phase of a project. (Students who received credit for UX 241H  may not receive credit for this course).  (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , GS 1003  or GS 1030H , and sophomore standing) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe how design thinking drives innovation and change across disciplines and industries 
    • Demonstrate key steps and techniques of design thinking, especially in brainstorming, re-framing, sketching, and iterative prototyping  
    • Apply design thinking to solve human-centered problems    
    • Implement design thinking in individual and group projects 
    • Adopt and exhibit a design thinking mindset

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Design thinking as an interdisciplinary framework and innovation strategy
    • Design thinking case studies and best practices 
    • Design thinking process  
    • Finding inspiration through empathy
    • Ideating breakthrough solutions through reframing and creative brainstorming 
    • Prototyping to refine the solution 
    • Harnessing the power of storytelling to share breakthrough solutions and inspire actions  
    • Design thinking sprints

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
  •  

    SS 3700 - Digital Society

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    As AI and other technologies advance and become increasingly entwined with daily life, society is rapidly changing in response. This course examines the impacts of these changes on personal relationships and on the world’s economic, cultural, political, and social infrastructures. Students will reflect on digital technology’s effects on the human condition by applying liberal arts perspectives to their own personal and professional experiences through course readings, classroom lecture, media analysis, discussion of case studies, and research/writing workshops. A mix of individual personal-reflection essays and a collaborative digital-storytelling project will allow students to explore course-related topics they are curious about in greater detail. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • State the interdisciplinary influences underlying the concept of the Information Age 
    • Evaluate various sources of news and other content
    • Discern differences between media manipulation and legitimate digital content
    • Recognize the effects of digital disruption on economic, social, and political systems
    • Describe the opportunities, limitations, and implications of artificial intelligence for humans/society
    • Analyze the implications of and potential for immersive experience in multiple contexts via virtual and augmented reality 
    • Understand the impact of social media “influencers” (e.g., on YouTube, Instagram, etc.) on culture, politics, society, and personal/professional identity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College-level writing, research, and presentation skills

    Course Topics
    • Contemporary digital literacy in the Information Age
    • Evaluation of online sources, impact of the deep/dark webs, and interpretation of digital artifacts
    • Media manipulation, including propaganda, advertising, social “proof,” clickbait, digital misdirection, and further examination of fake news
    • Mass media, both traditional and contemporary, including analog forms that interconnect with digital media
    • Immersive experience via virtual and augmented reality
    • Digital citizenship and digital rights
    • AI, IoT, and humans/society
    • Social media influencers” (e.g., on YouTube, Instagram, etc.) and their impact on culture, politics, society, and personal/professional identity

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  •  

    SS 4595 - The Sustainable City

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The first decade of the twenty-first century has seen a concerted effort among many politicians, policymakers, and urban planners to create greener, more sustainable cities. This course will take such efforts seriously, exploring in depth why and how urban centers across the globe are attempting to become more environmentally conscious. What is fueling this re-imagining of the city, and why is it happening now? Who is, and who isn’t, participating in such discussions? Questions of politics and public policy will drive this course, but attention will also be paid to economic factors (including the flight of capital and the legacy of deindustrialization) and a host of non-state actors (such as groups dedicated to conservation and environmental justice). This course will also feature a service-learning component, allowing students to see first-hand how such ideas are playing out in the city of Milwaukee. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the contexts (including political, economic, and social) in which they will have to operate as professionals
    • Demonstrate an understanding of such important - though often ambiguous - concepts as “sustainability”, “environmentalism”, and “green technology”
    • Partner with groups working on issues of sustainability in Milwaukee, allowing them to see how their skill sets can apply to the “real world”

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  •  

    SS 4715M - Middle Eastern Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of the various cultural aspects of contemporary Middle Eastern societies. Of particular importance will be the role of Islam as a religious, social, and cultural system among the various ethnicities and societies in the Middle East. Also examined will be the economic systems of nomadic and pastoral groups, agriculturalists, and modern urban dwellers; kinship, marriage and the family; women in Middle Eastern societies; and political systems in the Middle East. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the various societies and cultures of the Middle East and particularly how Islam shapes many facets of that culture
    • Describe how Islam has shaped and continues to shape the status of women in Islamic society

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  •  

    SS 4795 - Latin American Society

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines contemporary relations in Latin America between indigenous and non-indigenous populations with a special focus on Guatemala. The culture of the indigenous peoples of Latin America will be examined, particularly the Maya Indians of Guatemala. The course will also examine the governmental and political relationships that exist between indigenous villages and the central government in Guatemala, with special emphasis upon the effects that the Guatemalan Civil War has had upon these relationships. Students must receive the instructors’ permission to register for this course. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the cultures and contemporary challenges of indigenous people in Latin America with an emphasis upon the residents of the Highlands of Guatemala.  Of special concern will be the relationship that indigenous people in the rural highlands of Guatemala have with the Latino-dominated government and society of Guatemala
    • Explain the basic concepts and terms of cultural anthropology
    • Demonstrate the methods and theories that surround the production of ethnographic data concerning a specific culture
    • Demonstrate the basic ideas of ethnology and compare and contrast different cultures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung

Technical Communication

  
  •  

    TC 334 - Project Communications

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on rhetorical theory and practice associated with all communications involved in project management covering the entire life of a project. Project management methodologies are introduced to provide an understanding of contexts in which project communications occur. Special emphasis is given to communicating with internal and external audiences; communicating “up” and “down” a company’s organizational hierarchy; shaping content across temporalities, platforms, and contexts; addressing tacit/hidden rhetorical challenges; documenting processes; reporting on status/progress to multiple audiences and for multiple purposes; optimizing communications aspects of knowledge management; improving teamwork and morale; and communicating “change.” Tools and techniques for streamlining project communications will be introduced and utilized. Classroom time is divided between lecture and writing workshops. Writing projects are a mix of individual assignments, in-class exercises (including case studies), and a final group research project on a selected project-communications topic.  (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify multiple potential audiences for any message and reshape that message to accomplish rhetorical goals
    • Employ key vocabulary associated with project management, change management, knowledge management, and rhetorical theory
    • Create communications appropriate to the various phases of a project’s lifecycle
    • Employ software and professional tools to facilitate collaborative project communications
    • Determine the best medium for communication in any given context
    • Skill in interpersonal communications, including one-on-one conversations and larger group discussions
    • Apply business communication principles in routine transactional communications for successful team building and effective interaction with a diverse array of clients, content providers, and outside contractors
    • Apply ethical behaviors in ambiguous contexts
    • Capture, document, and apply knowledge from current and past projects

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Rhetorical principles of business communication
    • Project lifecycle, project-management methodologies, and associated communications (key purposes, documents, processes, contexts)
    • Principles of persuasion
    • Reshaping messages for different audiences (multiple levels, hidden functions, and unanticipated future contexts)
    • Strengthening relationships through improved routine communications
    • Communication strategies for effective meetings
    • Ethical dilemmas in project communications
    • Communication strategies for optimizing knowledge management systems
    • High-stakes project communications: delivering bad news, making demands, communicating change, crisis communications
    • Social media for project communications
    • Using collaborative tools and strategies to manage communication projects

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  •  

    TC 342 - Professional Presentations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course is designed to challenge conventional methods of creating and delivering professional presentations. The course incorporates several ground-breaking presentation approaches that have influenced the perceptions of the world’s famous brands and businesses. Through hands-on projects, students will learn how to apply innovative presentation techniques to create influential content, captivating visuals, and dynamic and memorable performances. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , GS 1003  or GS 1030H , and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate design ideas effectively 
    • Deliver professional team presentations
    • Facilitate a web-based presentation
    • Use creativity and innovation in slide design and delivery

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of public speaking and interpersonal communication 

    Course Topics
    • Boardroom style presentations       
    • TED Talk-style presentations
    • Remote presentations and video conferencing
    • Principles of effective slide design 
    • Working with data 
    • Effective delivery practices 
    • Group presentation basics   
    • Creative approaches to presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 452 - Interpersonal Communication

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop competencies in the areas of interpersonal communication in both the public and personal arenas. Assignments focus on the design and process of engaging with verbal and non-verbal messages in both personal and professional contexts. Other areas of skill development covered include active listening, perception checking, development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships, interpersonal conflict, and awareness of the intercultural and international aspects of interpersonal communication. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate messages effectively
    • Explain the role of nonverbal messages in communication 
    • Practice active listening techniques
    • Practice leadership skills 
    • Identify stages of interpersonal relationships
    • Identify sources of interpersonal conflict.
    • Recall theories of power and influence

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of communication

    Course Topics
    • Foundations of interpersonal communication
    • Perception of the self and others 
    • Culture and interpersonal communication
    • Verbal messages
    • Nonverbal messages
    • Listening 
    • Collaboration and creativity in teams
    • Interpersonal relationship 
    • Interpersonal conflict
    • Interpersonal power and influence

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 490 - Independent Study

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This subject provides an advanced student with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of an area within the field of technical communication. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determined by instructor for each student

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    TC 495 - Selected Topics-Tech Communication

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers timely topics in the technical communication field or specialized subjects that reflect the expertise/interest of current Technical Communication program faculty. This course fulfills the TC 495 requirement for Technical Communication majors. It also fulfills requirements for the Technical Communication minor, with individual course sections identified by subject area (theory, speaking, writing, applications) requirements met. This class is limited to 15 students. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies by course

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  •  

    TC 498 - Technical Communication Practicum

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to give students working toward the technical communication minor an opportunity to gain workplace experience in the technical communication field. Each student is required to submit a final report documenting all aspects of the practicum experience. (prereq: enrollment in TC minor and consent of program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop job search and interview skills
    • Explore diverse career options and interests
    • Develop or enhance professional skills and knowledge of workplace procedures
    • Develop networking contacts with professionals in a relevant field
    • Enhance professional résumés through on-the-job experience
    • Develop teamwork and leadership skills
    • Apply classroom learning to authentic work experience

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 499 - Technical Communication Internship

    6 lecture hours 0 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    The senior technical communication student is required to work in an approved technical communication situation. All internships must be arranged through the Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department. This internship is designed to allow the student to experience the realities of the profession. Each student is required to submit a comprehensive final report documenting all aspects of the internship. (prereq: senior standing, consent of program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Learn how the communication area fits in with the rest of the company
    • Learn how jobs are assigned to this area of the company
    • Learn how to assist their supervisors in conceptualizing a project
    • Learn how to assist or take charge of completing a project
    • Learn the value of performing as a professional by being critical, helpful, punctual and polite
    • Learn the value of cooperating with fellow employees

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Must be senior status
    • One quarter advance application to the Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department and the permission of the department chairperson

    Course Topics
    • The projects are totally dependent on the host company

    Laboratory Topics
    • In a sense, all work done by the student is laboratory work because the student devotes his/her entire effort toward completing an actual project assigned by the company

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 1400 - Foundations of Communication Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to both the rhetorical theory supporting and the practical applications of messages. Students will encounter a series of classic and contemporary readings to prompt examinations of rational thinking and decision making in a variety of contexts. In addition, they will analyze the arguments, premises, and conclusions of messages delivered across various media. Project work will include refining their own messaging in their personal and professional correspondence and on their social media platforms.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Communicate ideas effectively 
    • Practice leadership skills
    • Explain the relevance of rhetoric to everyday life
    • Describe the problems of generalizations and causal claims
    • Identify fake news, suspect sources
    • Explain errors in reasoning and logical fallacies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Interdisciplinary nature of communication design
    • Classical rhetorical theory 
    • Rationality and dialogue
    • Arguments: premises and conclusions
    • Generalizations, analogies, and causal claims
    • Common mistakes in reasoning
    • Media, messages, and fake news
    • Issues in contemporary rhetoric

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 2010 - Writing for Digital Media

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course introduces students to theory and practice of writing for digital contexts. Students will learn how to create text that is clear, direct, and effective in a variety of web-based environments. Through readings and classroom discussion, students will improve their ability to analyze digital texts and evaluate their quality. This course uses a writing workshop approach with significant focus on discussion of student work. Projects include creating and localizing content for websites, editing for more readable style and structure, writing UX microcopy to create consistent design across platforms, improving SEO for websites and social media, and customizing content for specific social media channels. Students cannot get credit for both TC 4320  Publishing Across Media and TC 2010 Writing for Digital Media. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply best practices of writing for the digital world
    • Employ strong UX writing style 
    • Create content and publishing strategies for social media, websites, and other UX copy (e.g., email design)
    • Understand translation issues
    • Demonstrate ability to localize UX copy to different markets
    • Create effective calls to action, including copy on call-to-action buttons

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic knowledge of thesis statements
    • Ability to summarize text for the main point
    • Knowledge of report structure and document design
    • Experience with visual design

    Course Topics
    • Writing style (including consistency, clarity, correctness, conciseness; also global English)
    • Writing UX copy: best practices for functionality, brand building, and relationship management
    • Creating calls to action
    • Optimizing search engine optimization (SEO) in headings, topic sentences, key words, and first paragraph
    • Content optimization for web/social media
    • Adjusting/localizing writing style to fit audience needs/expectations
    • Writing/editing workshops

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff

  
  •  

    TC 2030 - Collaborative Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares students to be productive collaborators both in the workplace and in their everyday lives. It affords students the opportunity to learn and apply principles of small group communication. Specifically, students will gain knowledge of and experience in creative collaboration, group dynamics, and cross-functional teams. Students will be introduced to processes and tools that enable them to engage in purposeful conversations, create and advance a shared vision, build an effective team, and produce quality deliverables. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and GS 1003  or GS 1030H  and junior standing or instructor approval)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate design ideas effectively 
    • Practice leadership skills
    • Apply creative methods of collaboration
    • Analyze personality and work style profiles
    • Develop a team assessment
    • Create a performance plan for another team member

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Foundations of collaboration
    • Understanding self and others 
    • Creating a cohesive group 
    • Creativity and innovation in collaboration
    • Group decision-making 
    • Group problem-solving techniques 
    • Negotiating conflict with group members 
    • Leadership and coaching 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 2040 - Intelligent Publishing

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to single-source authoring and multi-channel publishing. In a mix of lectures and interactive workshops, it presents and puts into practice principles of usable information design, task-based user analysis, and content management. Students use and learn MadCap Flare, an industry-leading authoring and publishing software tool, to intelligently design and develop various document types (such as online help, manuals, handbooks, and corporate communications) complete with navigational aids, table of contents, indexes, and glossaries. After completing this course, students will be able to use MadCap Flare to publish a variety of professional document types by maximizing content reuse. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Author content in a topic-based, modular approach
    • Understand and put into practice single-source, multi-channel publishing
    • Structure content for various outputs including print, online, mobile, and tablets
    • Execute content management and content reuse strategies
    • Exhibit proficiency in MadCap Flare software

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in writing and grammar
    • Fundamentals of page layout and design
    • Organizational skills

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to intelligent content authoring and publishing
    • Analyzing information needs to structure content
    • Using and learning MadCap Flare (an authoring and publishing software tool) through hands-on workshops
    • Authoring content in a topic-based, modular approach
    • Single-sourcing strategies using conditional tags and topic reuse
    • Defining, creating, and using variables
    • Defining, creating, and using snippets
    • Creating table of contents, glossaries, and indexes
    • Adding links and other navigational techniques
    • Using graphics in information design for multi-channel publishing
    • Introduction to Flare templates, skins, and style sheets
    • Editing and quality controlling multi-channel publishing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 2050 - Healthcare Communication

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows students to investigate the nature of health communication. Specifically, through readings, in-class lecture, discussion, assignments, and experiential activities, this class will explore the theory, skills, and technology associated with communicating in various care contexts. This includes communication among providers, family caregivers, patients, healthcare organizations, and in mediated messages in the marketing and promotion of health information and the politics of health care. We will examine the interpersonal, narrative, and translational aspects of health and healthcare. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe healthcare communication genres
    • Identify the public, political, social, and cultural considerations of healthcare communication
    • Explain stigmas associated with various health conditions 
    • Describe possible perspectives of providers, caregivers, and patients
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Analyze interpersonal, narrative, and translational aspects of health and healthcare

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Patient-caregiver communication
    • Hospital and insurance communication
    • Public and political considerations
    • Social and cultural considerations
    • Stigma and mental health
    • Narrative medicine
    • Provider and caregiver perspectives
    • Patient perspectives
    • Palliative care 
    • Healthcare communication and technology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 3010 - Digital Workplace

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Today, more and more organizations, both large and small, are adopting business models, practices, and tools that allow workers greater flexibility and change our perceptions of how, where, and when we work. This class will examine four dimensions of the digital workplace: Space, Capabilities, Intelligence, and Beauty. User experience professionals play a key role in creating the digital workplace experience by creating immersive intranets and frictionless collaborative environments rooted in data. This class will include a mixture of lecture, discussion, and project work. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the major considerations of the digital workplace
    • Identify the opportunities and challenges associated collaboration
    • Understand basic principles of content strategy and content management 
    • Demonstrate knowledge and application of professional software and cloud-based productivity tools 
    • Understand digital workplace strategy, governance, and how both are impacted by company strategy 
    • Know how to gather, read, and analyze digital workplace metrics and tie them back to KPIs 

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of communication, collaboration, and research

    Course Topics
    • Organizational culture and communication strategies
    • Company communications and assets responsibly
    • Communication channels (formal/official versus informal/grapevine)
    • Intranets (design, usability, mobility, searchability, findability, platforms, and communication)
    • Collaboration & social (communities, collaborative tools, remote working)
    • Content management (publishing, life cycle, models, strategy)
    • Digital platforms (on premises and cloud-based)
    • Strategy & governance (Digital Workplace roadmap, governance structure & tactics)
    • Metrics & measurement (digital analytics, alignment with KPI)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey

  
  •  

    TC 3015 - Digital Storytelling

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    The need to share stories and understand ourselves and others are common across cultures and eras. Stories engage, inspire, and teach.  Storytelling helps professionals communicate about scientific and technical research, as well as craft a shared, holistic view of how an individual interacts with a text or technology. Today technology enables us to create digital stories that foster creativity, empower social impact, build a personal or corporate brand, and share life events. This course covers fundamental principles and application of digital storytelling relevant to professionals across disciplines, and walks students through the entire process of creating a digital story. Class activities include readings, discussions, in-class workshops, and a collaborative project in which students apply storytelling craft to develop a digital story using Adobe Premiere and other relevant tools (e.g., StoryboardThat, WeVideo).     (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H , and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concept of digital storytelling
    • Explain relevance of digital storytelling to professional activities and effective communication
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of digital storytelling 
    • Select and analyze effective multimedia assets for content, point of view, purpose, and quality
    • Apply knowledge of effective digital storytelling craft to professional contexts 
    • Understand the legal and ethical laws and issues related to using digital assets 
    • Create a digital story using Adobe Premier and other relevant tools 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Composition
    • Technical writing
    • Public speaking

    Course Topics
    • Storytelling foundations (elements of stories, how stories work) 
    • Professional applications of digital storytelling  
    • Basic elements of scripts 
    • Storyboards 
    • Ethical research and use of digital assets in storytelling
    • Digital story creation process
    • Digital storyteller’s toolbox 

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey

  
  •  

    TC 3020 - Instructional Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course acquaints the student with the processes and tools involved in the design of a training program. Students will discover the considerations involved in instructor-led training, e-learning (primarily asynchronous), and hybrid course development. Students will build an e-learning training module from the needs assessment phase through to the evaluation of that training. Students will implement stakeholder requirements, end-user needs, and user experience. Activities include lectures, discussion groups, group projects, and student presentations. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and GS 1003  or GS 1030H  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of human-centered design
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate design ideas effectively
    • Exhibit proficiency in e-learning software
    • Create learning objectives and assessment questions
    • Design an e-learning module

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Adult learning theory and instructional design foundations
    • Training needs assessment
    • Instructor-led training 
    • Asynchronous e-learning
    • Hybrid learning and learning management systems
    • Effective, measurable learning objectives 
    • Design documents 
    • Content and storyboards 
    • Measurements and assessments

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey

  
  •  

    TC 3030 - Conflict Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop competencies in understanding, analyzing, transforming, and resolving conflicts at multiple levels. It includes case studies and activities that allow students to examine conflict at the interpersonal, organizational, and community/cultural levels. Topics covered include using conflict in the creative process, influencing without power, conflict intervention, and resolving non-productive conflict. Other areas of skill development covered include negotiating interests versus positions, coaching and mediation, and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H  and GS 1003  or GS 1030H  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Articulate theories of conflict, power, and influence
    • Analyze conflict at interpersonal, organizational, and community levels
    • Negotiate conflict using interests
    • Analyze methods of dispute mediation
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate design ideas effectively 
    • Practice leadership skills 
    • Formulate plans for conflict intervention

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Verbal messages
    • Nonverbal messages
    • Listening 
    • Interpersonal relationships
    • Culture and communication

    Course Topics
    • Theories of conflict 
    • Theories of power and influence
    • Conflict analysis and assessment
    • Negotiating interests versus positions
    • Dispute mediation
    • Dialogue facilitation
    • Conflict intervention

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    TC 3320 - User Documentation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course gives the student practical experience in developing and preparing user documentation for software and hardware products. Discussions emphasize the importance of knowing your audience and writing efficient documentation that is clear, concise, and accurate. Students learn and experience first-hand the end-to-end documentation process, including the software tool, Adobe Acrobat Pro, to publish documentation in a professional PDF output. The major requirement for this course is researching and developing a form of user documentation, such as a user manual or tutorial. The user documentation completed as a PDF will be of a quality that it can be used as part of the student’s portfolio. In addition, the student is responsible for a number of assignments leading up to the completion of the user documentation; these include, but are not limited to, a user analysis, documentation plan, and style guide. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the process involved in the creation and production of user documentation
    • Structure and organize content based on analysis and persona creation to meet the needs of users 
    • Communicate content effectively for various media: print, online, and mobile
    • Work effectively with subject matter experts 
    • Edit documents for style and content to ensure the highest quality
    • Exhibit proficiency in Adobe Acrobat Pro software

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in writing and grammar
    • Proficiency in Word or desktop publishing software tools and concepts
    • Fundamentals of page layout and design
    • Organizational skills

     


    Course Topics
    • Definition and principles of technical user documentation
    • Characteristics of efficient user documentation
    • Ethics in technical communication and user documentation
    • The writing and publication process
    • Agile and waterfall work processes and their implications to user documentation
    • Understanding your audience
    • Conducting research and interviewing subject matter experts
    • Documentation planning
    • Style guides
    • Technical definition, description, and instructions
    • Safeties (notes, cautions, warnings, and dangers)
    • Legalities (citation, trademarks, copyrights, and service marks)
    • Technical illustration
    • Editing (managerial, substantive, copyediting, and proofreading)
    • Introduction to help authoring tools and desktop publishing software
    • Creating PDFs with bookmarks and links using Adobe Acrobat Pro
    • Performing documentation reviews with Adobe Acrobat Pro

    Coordinator
    Dianne Bender

  
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    TC 4320 - Publishing Across Media

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the publishing industry and provides an overview of the entire process of publication, from the topic proposal stage through the printing and distribution of the final published product. All forms of publishing are covered: books, magazines (consumer, literary, trade), refereed professional journals, newsletters, and electronic venues and students develop strategies for targeting specific outlets for their work. Students write a series of individual query proposals, reviews, and articles, and they produce a newsletter issue, participating in all phases of the editing process from initial brainstorming and audience analysis to printing and distribution of the final publication. Students cannot get credit for both TC 4320 Publishing Across Media and TC 2010 Writing for Digital Media. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , and GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the organization of the publishing industry
    • Appreciate the professional ethos of editors and publishers
    • Demonstrate familiarity with editing techniques
    • Identify and use rhetorical techniques exhibited by models of effective writing about science and technology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Audience analysis
    • Elements of technical style
    • Rhetorical forms
    • Page design
    • Document design
    • Techniques of illustration

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction
    • Overview of publishing industry
    • Writing for popular audiences
    • Grammar, punctuation, and style concerns
    • Writing for professional audiences
    • Discussion of editing strategies and techniques
    • Hands-on supervised writing workshops
    • Hands on supervised editing workshops
    • Midterm exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  •  

    TC 4510 - Mass Media, Culture, and Society

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is meant to introduce students to the history, structure, and function of the mass media in the United States, paying close attention to how Americans have created and received information. The class will examine the role that such ideas as individual identity, nation-building, globalization, and regulation have played in the evolution of mass media. The course further interrogates the mechanisms of mass media - with an emphasis on the rise of social media - while fully exploring the relationship between technological advancement and the ways that Americans communicate. Students cannot get credit for both TC4510 and SS 3700 Digital Society. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the history of various media
    • Understand the laws, rules and regulations under which various media operate
    • Understand the forces that shape and are shaped by the media
    • View the media from the basis of both a viewer/reader and a critic

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction
    • Mass communications: process and effect
    • Global impact of modern media
    • Journalism: the practice and profession of news gathering
    • Historic press freedoms
    • The newspapers industry - current trends, use of graphics, etc.
    • Advertising and public relations
    • Publishing: books and magazines
    • Broadcasting: TV, radio/current programming trends
    • The film industry
    • Social media
    • Recordings: video, audio, digital data
    • The “information highway” - cable, computer networks, and more
    • Education and mass media
    • Media ownership
    • Credibility: trusting the purveyors of media
    • Influence: how do mass media affect culture and society?
    • Ethics: media and social responsibility
    • The legal environment
    • Media and government: regulation and legislation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  •  

    TC 4540 - Online Help Authoring

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a study of the design and development of effective online help systems documentation. It presents principles of usable online information design, task-based user analysis, and tools for developing and delivering online help systems. Instruction will be provided in the use of an industry leading help authoring tool. Students will design and develop an online help project complete with embedded help, navigational aids, table of contents, index, and glossary. After completing this course, students will be able to create professional online help systems to effectively meet users’ needs. Students cannot get credit for both TC 4540 and TC 2040. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , and GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Conduct a user and task analysis
    • Plan and apply online documentation strategies
    • Use online help authoring applications (specific help authoring tool will be determined by instructor and industry trends)
    • Manage formatting, mechanics, and common sentence-style problems
    • Plan, design, and create graphics for communicating technical information online
    • Create online help from information in other media

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of technical writing

    Coordinator
    Dianne Bender

Undergraduate Research

  
  •  

    UR 4981 - Undergraduate Research I

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first course in the three-course undergraduate research sequence. The goal of the course sequence is to allow undergraduate students to actively participate in a research project, the outcome of which is a thesis document. The student, under the supervision of a faculty member, pursues a research topic in that faculty member’s area of expertise. Approval of the research topic and project scope is required. In this course, the student conducts a literature search in the research area, defines the problem statement, and develops a project plan. The student also begins to examine theoretical concepts pertinent to the research project. (prereq: consent of department chair, junior standing, cumulative GPA >=3.2)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the research process
    • Conduct a literature search and create an annotated bibliography
    • Effectively read and evaluate journal articles
    • Formulate a research problem statement
    • Demonstrate independent thinking and learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • To be determined by faculty advisor

    Laboratory Topics
    • No associated laboratory

    Coordinator
    Dr. Cory Prust
  
  •  

    UR 4982 - Undergraduate Research II

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second course in the three-course undergraduate research sequence. In this course, the student begins the main body of research and produces a set of preliminary results pertaining to the project. These results are collected in an interim research report. (prereq: UR 4981 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop technical and scientific expertise in the research area
    • Report results in a manner appropriate for scientific research
    • Demonstrate independent thinking and learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • To be determined by faculty advisor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Cory Prust
  
  •  

    UR 4983 - Undergraduate Research III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the final course in the three-course undergraduate research sequence. In the first part of the course, the student continues and then completes the main body of research. In the second part of the course, the student disseminates the research findings in both written and oral formats. The student prepares a thesis document which is submitted to the faculty advisor in advance of a public oral presentation. (prereq: UR 4982 , consent of department chair).
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate technical and scientific expertise in the research area
    • Prepare a written thesis, which documents the research project and findings
    • Present the research in a formal public forum
    • Demonstrate independent thinking and learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • To be determined by faculty advisor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Cory Prust

User Experience

  
  •  

    UX 241H - Easy by Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course introduces students to the foundations of design thinking as a human-centered approach to solving complex problems in the physical and digital worlds. The course will draw on the design thinking theory and best practices developed and popularized by IDEO, a global design company.  Through case studies of successful technical, healthcare, and social innovations, students will explore how design thinking can lead to better design and business solutions. The course will run as a design thinking studio where students will work on hands-on, real life projects that benefit the local and global community. Special emphasis is placed on leveraging designing thinking framework to understand, appreciate, and mobilize the power of place (e.g., city) for individuals and communities. The course is designed with the MSOE honors program students in mind but is open to any MSOE student who wants to deepen their understanding of human-centered design and its ability to influence and change individuals, teams, organizations, places, and communities. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Become proficient in key steps, strategies, and best practices of design thinking 
    • Understand how design thinking drives innovation and change across disciplines and industries 
    • Leverage design thinking to catalyze the power of place and to create a lasting impact in that place
    • Apply design thinking to unlock their creative potential 
    • Implement design thinking in individual and group projects 
    • Adopt a design thinking mindset

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera
  
  •  

    UX 242 - Collaborative Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Through this course, it is intended that the student will learn, understand, and apply the principles of a collaborative design process. Specifically, students will gain knowledge of and experience in creative collaboration, group dynamics, and cross-functional teams. Students will be introduced to processes and tools that enable them to engage in purposeful conversations, create and advance a shared vision, build an effective team, and produce quality deliverables. Students cannot receive credit for both UX 242 Collaborative Design and TC 2030 Collaborative Design. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and GS 1003  or GS 1030H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively in cross-functional teams
    • Communicate design ideas effectively 
    • Practice leadership skills
    • Apply creative methods of collaboration
    • Analyze personality and work style profiles
    • Develop a team assessment
    • Create a performance plan for another team member

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Foundations of collaboration
    • Understanding self and others 
    • Creating a cohesive group 
    • Creativity and innovation in collaboration
    • Group decision-making 
    • Group problem-solving techniques 
    • Negotiating conflict with group members 
    • Leadership and coaching

    Coordinator
    Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey
  
  •  

    UX 253 - Global User Experience

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course introduces students to the principles, best practices, and design methodologies behind building inclusive and globally accessible digital products at Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon. The course focuses on how cultural, language and environmental factors, physical and cognitive disabilities, and different levels of literacy impact design, improve apps and website usability, and contribute to overall user experience.  Students also learn the role of accessible design in which the needs of people with disabilities are specifically considered and will also learn about promoting users’ privacy, safety, security, and broader inclusion in society.  Course projects include analyses of global UX products and a design of a conceptual UI (wireframe level) appropriate for global users.  Course projects include readings, discussions, in-class workshops and design sprints, and group work. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of intercultural theories and their application to UX design
    • Define and analyze inclusive and accessibility design  principles in global UX products  
    • Apply knowledge of accessibility design to develop products for people with disabilities
    • Apply inclusive design principles to make tactical decisions when designing for global users  
    • Communicate UX design ideas clearly and convincingly 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Audience analysis
    • Foundations of UX

    Course Topics
    • Culturally responsible design 
    • Global user communities and their use of technology     
    • Inclusive design framework
    • Logistical consideration in designing for global audiences
    • Designing for emerging markets and new users
    • Designing for environmental constraints
    • Accessible design at Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Amazon   
    • UX writing for global users
    • Designing global products for social good 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera
  
  •  

    UX 255 - User Interface Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course will introduce students to the theory and practice of designing intuitive user interfaces (UIs). Through a series of case studies and exercises, students will learn the best practices of UI design for different platforms (iOS or Android), how to gather requirements, develop user stories, wireframe, and iterate through the design loop. The course major project will ask students to wireframe and design a working prototype of a mobile, desktop, web or smart application with main screens. Students cannot receive credit for both UX 255 User Interface Design and UX 2011  Interface Design I. (prereq: UX 1400 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply user experience and visual design theory in the design of intuitive UIs
    • Understand how user interface design is integrated into the field of user experience 
    • Execute a functional prototype utilizing user interface design principles while considering contexts & audiences
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of HTML and CSS
    • Show proficiency in basic functions of professional UI design tools

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of UX
    • Foundations of visual design 

    Course Topics
    • User Interface (UI) vs. User Experience (UX)
    • UI essentials
    • UI design principles
    • Best practices of UI design across platforms
    • Considerations for voice interfaces and zero UIs
    • Information architecture
    • Interaction design
    • Visual design
    • Graphics
    • Design workflow
    • UI design software (e.g., Adobe XD, Axure, InVision) 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 333 - Knowledge and Content Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This is a survey course encompassing the fundamentals of knowledge management (KM) and content management (CM) systems. KM promotes the discovery, capture, sharing, and application of an organization’s knowledge. CM enables effective content storage, management, collaboration, and presentation. Both KM and CM are used for the purpose of creating competitive advantage through a learning organization. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Execute a clear understanding of what knowledge and content management are and how they benefit an organization
    • Demonstrate a better understanding of knowledge and content sharing and knowledge transfer
    • Exercise knowledge of content creation for knowledge management and learning organizations
    • Demonstrate a working knowledge of explicit and tacit knowledge for creating competitive advantage
    • Create a knowledge management plan to leverage opportunities to create, capture, represent and share knowledge within an organization

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Knowledge management strategy
    • Knowledge management tools
    • Content management strategy
    • Content management tools
    • Applications of knowledge and content management

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera

  
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    UX 345 - Agile Project Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to expose students to the realities of agile project management through participation in a project-from inception to completion. It addresses the dynamic and fluid nature of people in projects, project teams and management styles, as well as the techniques used to adjust a project in real-time as a way of addressing customer and project needs. Emphasis is placed on “agility” as a vehicle for creating innovative products and services. Students cannot receive credit for both UX 345 Agile Project Management and UX 3031  Agile Product Management. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an expanded vocabulary of agile product management terminology
    • Recognize different ways to integrate UX into an agile work environment
    • Apply agile methodology to organize and work within an agile product team
    • Know how collaborative thinking and planning drives product development
    • Develop proficiency in digital product management tools 
    • Adopt an agile mindset

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Overview of the agile project management industry in comparison to traditional management styles (2 classes)
    • The relationship between customer satisfaction and the early and continuous delivery of applicable software (1 class)
    • The need to embrace changing requirements, even late into the development cycle (1 class)
    • Lessons in using Scrum (1 class)
    • Getting business people and developers to work collaboratively (2 classes)
    • Building projects around motivated people (1 class)
    • The need for face-to-face conversations (1 class)
    • Agile processes and sustainable development (4 classes)
    • How technical excellence and good design enhances agility (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Amii LaPointe
  
  •  

    UX 361 - UX Research

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course will introduce you to UX research methods within a product development process. You will learn how to choose the right research method, or methods, based on the product’s maturity, the development phase, and organizational constraints. You will also have an opportunity to conduct research using the methodologies learned in class. Students cannot receive credit for both UX 361 UX Research and UX 3011  UX Research I. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • ​Understand the basics of UX research methods and its importance in creating positive user experiences and business outcomes
    • Recognize the importance of clearly defining the problem and audience for a research study
    • Understand how to plan and facilitate usability research studies
    • Analyze results and present the outcomes to product stakeholders
    • Identify and navigate environmental factors surrounding UX research

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of UX
    • Basics of conducting research

    Course Topics
    • Overview of UX research and methodologies
    • Traditional and specialized UX research methodologies (e.g., usability testing, card sorting, eye tracking and click testing, surveys, user personas, etc.)
    • Choosing a research type: quantitative, qualitative, and mixed
    • Defining target users for research
    • Defining problems for research
    • UX research in product development
    • Choosing a design testing approach (e.g., in-person research vs. remote, moderated vs. automated techniques).
    • Design testing with users; visual design mock-ups and usability testing.
    • Conducting a UX research project
    • Considerations for global UX research
    • Analyzing and presenting research findings
    • Facilitating a design workshop

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera
  
  •  

    UX 490 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This selection allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature survey, analysis, design or laboratory study.  (prereq: sophomore standing and permission of UX program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determined by instructor for individual student

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 495 - UX Selected Studies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers timely topics in User Experience or specialized subjects that reflect the expertise/interest of current Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department Faculty.   (prereq: sophomore standing and permission of UX program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies by course

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 498 - UX Practicum

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    UX 498 is designed to give students working toward the User Experience and Communication Design degree or User Experience minor to gain workplace experience in the user experience field. Students are required to submit a final report documenting all aspects of the practicum experience.  (prereq: sophomore standing, enrollment in the UX program or UX minor, and permission of UX program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explore diverse UX career options and interests in UX
    • Develop or enhance professional skills and knowledge of UX workplace practices
    • Develop networking contacts with professionals in the UX field
    • Enhance professional résumés through on-the-job experience
    • Develop teamwork and leadership skills
    • Apply classroom learning to an authentic UX work experience

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of UX

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 499 - UX and Communication Design Internship

    6 lecture hours 0 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    The senior user experience (UX) and communication design student is required to gain practical industry experience in the field of UX and technical communication. All internships must be arranged through the User Experience program. This internship is designed to allow the student to experience the realities of the UX profession. Each student is required to submit a comprehensive final report documenting all aspects of the internship. (prereq: junior standing and permission of the UX program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Learn how the UX and communication areas fit in with the rest of the company
    • Learn how jobs are assigned to these areas of the company
    • Learn how to assist their supervisors in conceptualizing a project
    • Learn how to assist or take charge of completing a project
    • Learn the value of performing as a professional by being critical, helpful, punctual, and polite
    • Learn the value of cooperating with fellow employees

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The projects are dependent on the host company

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 1400 - Foundations of User Experience

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This workshop-style course introduces students to basic concepts of User Experience (UX) design and explores key roles, skills, tools, and career paths for a UX specialist. The course focuses on human behavior and its effects on UX design. Class projects provide students with foundations of information architecture (IA), visual design, website maps and task flows, wireframing, usability, user research, content creation for UX, and data for UX designer. Online videos, guest speakers, and class discussions help students develop a better sense of the field and career options. Students build a basic digital portfolio to start branding themselves as UX professionals. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand UX as a combination of tools, methods, and heuristics for creating customer/user-friendly products, processes, and services
    • Show awareness of various UX career types and job responsibilities
    • Exhibit literacy in psychology of design
    • Demonstrate knowledge and application of key UX design principles, such as information architecture (IA), visual design, website maps and task flows, wireframing and prototyping, content creation, user research and usability testing
    • Demonstrate knowledge and application of some UX prototyping and Wireframing in class projects
    • Build a basic digital portfolio in Weebly or any other alternative free website builder

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Key UX concepts
    • UX job market and careers
    • Psychology of Design: Behavior basics
    • Information architecture
    • Site maps and task flows
    • Prototypes and wireframes
    • Visual design basics
    • User research and usability testing
    • Content strategy
    • Data for UX designers
    • UX portfolios

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 1511 - Visual Design I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Visual Design I is a foundational UX design course covering the basics of composition, typography, color, and imagery. Visual design enhances the usability of a product, and its aesthetic appeal, by shaping experiences to elicit user responses and behaviors that suit the use and purpose of a product. Students will learn Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. The course balances lecture, in-class workshops, and team projects, which include print/digital brochures and business cards. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how design impacts our daily lives 
    • Understand how visual design is integrated into the field of User Experience 
    • Execute a clear understanding of what constitutes effective design in visual communications 
    • Employ principles of effective design by use of typography and the interaction of type and imagery together 
    • Proficiency in basic functions of Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Acrobat-enough to create a quality design that could be taken to press or published digitally 

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Sketching
    • Principles of design
    • Design process
    • Designing for print and digital
    • Color aesthetics and theory
    • Basics of the psychology of design
    • Typography 
    • Imagery 
    • Constructive critiquing
    • Understanding audience
    • Adobe Creative Suite (Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
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    UX 1521 - Visual Design II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Visual Design II is the second class in the UX design sequence and builds on the foundational topics covered in Visual Design I. This class will take a dive deep into typography and composition and will cover advanced design topics as they relate to marketing, branding, and print/digital design. Visual design focuses on the aesthetics of a product and its related materials by strategically implementing images, colors, fonts, and other elements. Students will design a product campaign by creating a full spectrum of print and digital materials (including logos and icons) using Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator (basic tool proficiency required). The course is a balance between lecture, in-class workshops, and team projects.  (prereq: UX 1511 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Deep understanding of how to create thoughtful, high-impact designs 
    • Know how to create effective marketing materials, logos, and icons 
    • Demonstrate readiness to create usable digital interfaces 
    • Ability to lead design sessions and provide constructive feedback
    • Fluency in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator, enough to create any high-quality quality material in print or digital formats

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator
    • Basic knowledge of and working understanding of design principles, typography, color, imagery, and psychology of design

    Course Topics
    • Sketching
    • Emotional design
    • Advanced design principles
    • Grid design & style guides
    • Branding and logos
    • Icons
    • Typography and imagery
    • Leading design sessions & constructive critiquing
    • Understanding audience
    • Adobe Creative Suite (Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
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    UX 2011 - Interface Design I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Interface Design I is an introductory course to interface design theory and practice. Students will learn the principles of user interface design and some common elements of interfaces. Students will consider how to design interfaces for different audiences, contexts, and devices. The course will introduce students to Adobe XD, a prototyping tool, and students will expand on prototyping concepts from UX 1400  via hands-on practice. Students will also get an introduction to HTML and CSS and finish the course with a basic understanding of these two front-end technologies. The course explores these concepts and tools through a balance of lectures and in-class workshops.  (prereq: UX 1400 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how user interface design is integrated into the field of user experience 
    •  Execute a functional prototype utilizing user interface design principles while considering contexts & audiences 
    •  Basic understanding of HTML and CSS - student is able to read and manipulate HTML and CSS 
    •  Proficiency in basic functions of Adobe XD and Dreamweaver - student is able to create prototypes and basic HTML/CSS mockups

    Prerequisites by Topic
    •  Basic knowledge and understanding of principles of design
    •  Familiarity with Adobe products

    Course Topics
    • User interface design principles
    • Designing for different contexts, audiences, and devices
    • Expansion of wireframing and prototyping skills
    • Introduction to HTML
    • Introduction to CSS
    • HTML/CSS best practices
    • Adobe: XD, Sketch

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
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    UX 2021 - Interface Design II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Interface Design II is the second class in an interface design sequence that builds on the introductory topics covered in Interface Design I. The course expands on interface practices and topics and discusses concepts such as designing interfaces for multiple devices and designing for component-based interfaces. The prototyping concepts and practice of Interface Design I are expanded to include conditions, interactions, and workflows.  Students will expand proficiency with prototyping tools, Adobe XD and Axure, through workshops and assignments. Students will also be introduced to front-end frameworks and JavaScript and learn how to work with these tools as part of developing interfaces. This course balances lectures with in-class workshops to maximize theory and practice with concepts discussed. (prereq: UX 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how to create interface designs considering contexts, audiences, and devices
    • Proficiency in prototyping technique and workflows 
    • Execute a high-fidelity prototype 
    • Demonstrate proficiency with HTML, CSS,  Adobe XD, and Sketch
    • Demonstrate basic understanding of JavaScript 
    • Communicate design rationale and intent via annotations in prototyping tools 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of HTML and CSS
    • Functional proficiency with Adobe XD and Sketch

     


    Course Topics
    • Designing for multiple devices, including mobiles and wearables
    • Designing for different contexts and audiences 
    • Component-based UIs
    • Conditions and interactions for prototyping
    • Prototyping workflows
    • Introduction to front-end frameworks
    • Introduction to JavaScript

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
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    UX 2023 - Design Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    A design system is a collection of reusable components, guided by clear standards, that can be assembled together to build any number of applications. Students will learn about commonly used design systems, including Material Design and Human Interface Guidelines, and how they differ from branding standards or style guides. Students will learn about the basic components, patterns, and guidelines that make up a design system. The class will culminate in a project where students will build and leverage their own design system. (prereq: UX 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain familiarity with components of Material Design and Human Interface Guidelines and understand which components are appropriate to use on which platforms 
    • Conduct analyses of design systems and the components, standards, and patterns that make up a design system 
    • Communicate design system ideas to other students, who then will leverage that information in their own projects
    • Understand the difference between a design system, style guide, branding standards, and content standards 
    • Build a design system leveraging design and interface knowledge 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Students will need to possess an understanding of visual design and interfaces, which they will utilize when building components for their design system

    Course Topics
    • Google’s Material Design
    • Apple’s Human Interface Guidelines
    • Other commonly used design systems
    • Types of design systems
    • Basic design system principals
    • Functional and perceptual patterns in pattern libraries
    • Component libraries
    • Content, brand and visual style guides
    • Best practices for component design and utilization

    Coordinator
    Amii LaPointe
  
  •  

    UX 2024 - Information Architecture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This class introduces the core components of Information Architecture (IA). Information architecture focuses on the organization of a website or application in order to optimize the findability and searchability of digital assets. Good IA is an essential component of a good user experience because it brings together components of both research and design. IA research and design methods will be taught using both analog and digital tools. Additionally, strategies and approaches will be taught through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and hands-on research.  (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the discipline of Information Architecture and its importance in the digital world 
    • Know how people look for and categorize information 
    • Understand and know how to plan, communicate, and classify digital assets (i.e., content) 
    • Analyze and document information architectures 
    • Research and design an information architecture using digital and analog tools 

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of data analysis and techniques for information organization

    Course Topics
    • What is IA?
    • Importance of information architecture (IA) in a digital world
    • Cost of bad IA
    • Components of information architecture 
    • Understanding people and content
    • Taxonomy and metadata 
    • Optimizing for finadability and searchability
    • Documenting, evaluating, measuring, and testing information architecture  
    • Designing and researching information architecture
    • Open and closed card sorting, treejacking

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
  •  

    UX 2031 - Interaction Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    The final course of the interface design series, Interaction Design brings together all the concepts and tools learned in Interface Design I and Interface Design II. Students will learn goal-directed design and explore the interaction design process while demonstrating proficiency with applicable deliverables that are part of the process. The concepts and practices of the previous Interface classes are refined as students pick up more best practices and tools to further improve their interface design practice. Students will add to their JavaScript knowledge from the previous Interface Design courses and also learn to use CSS preprocessors for improved efficiency and more robust interactions. Students will strengthen their ability to communicate design rationale and intent via various forms of written communication. This course brings everything together through lectures and in-class workshops. (prereq: UX 2021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate understanding of interaction design process and applicable deliverables
    • Demonstrate functional proficiency with a front-end framework, prototyping technique, and workflows
    • Demonstrate functional proficiency of JavaScript, Adobe XD, and Dreamweaver
    • Demonstrate basic understanding of using a CSS preprocessor 
    • Communicate design rationale and intent via written communications 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Advanced interface design knowledge
    • Proficiency with prototyping tools (Adobe XD, Axure)
    • Proficiency with HTML/CSS
    • Basic understanding of JavaScript

     


    Course Topics
    • Goal-directed design
    •  Designing for different contexts, audiences, and devices
    •  Interaction design process
    •  CSS preprocessors
    •  Practical JavaScript
    •  Designing in the browser
    •  Adobe suite: XD, Dreamweaver 
    •  Axure

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
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    UX 3011 - UX Research I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course is an introduction to basic UX research focusing on the primary methods of conducting research, collecting data, analysis of this data, and reporting out the findings from the research conducted. Research is a core function of the field of User Experience (UX) to deeply understand users and their behaviors with products. Students will use both analog and digital tools to conduct research. This is a group-based class with a balance between lecture and hands-on learning. (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basics of UX research methods and its importance in creating positive user experiences and business outcomes 
    • Recognize the importance of clearly defining the problem and audience for a research study 
    • Understand UX research process, specifically how to plan and facilitate usability research studies 
    • Analyze results and present the outcomes to product stakeholders 
    • Work effectively in research teams 
    • Identify and navigate environmental factors surrounding UX research 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College-level research strategies developed in GS 1002 Freshman Studies II
    • Foundations of collaborative design or teamwork 

    Course Topics
    • Overview of UX research and methodologies
    • Formulating clear research hypotheses and objectives
    • Quantitative vs. qualitative research
    • Surveys, interviews, and focus groups
    • Heuristic evaluations
    • Usability testing (mobile, remote, in-person, formal, informal, moderated, automated)
    • Testing with mobile devices
    • Defining target audiences through research-based personas
    • Working in a research team
    • Conducting a UX research project
    • Analyzing and presenting research findings

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera
  
  •  

    UX 3015 - Designing for the Digital Future

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course focuses on designing for Extended Reality (XR), which encompasses Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Mixed Reality (MR). XR changes the way we think about designing digital interfaces because we are no longer constrained by two-dimensional (2D) space. And, the integration of virtual intelligence (VI)/artificial intelligence (AI) into VR, AR, and MR spaces has the potential to change the world by creating dynamic user interfaces and personalizing individual experiences through analysis of every user interaction. Additionally, the new paradigm of 3D content includes sound, touch, depth, and emotion and must be considered when designing these immersive experiences. In this class, you will explore emerging design patterns in 3D design, work towards creating new 3D design patterns and immersive interfaces, and understand the impacts of AI on 3D and user experience design. (prereq: UX 1521 , UX 2031 , UX 3021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the differences between AI, VI, AR, VR, MR, and “no” user interface technologies and how they work together to create personalized, immersive experiences 
    • Understand impacts of emerging technologies on the field of UX 
    • Understand the differences in designing for 2D versus 3D spaces
    • Demonstrate proficiency in inventorying objects within an experience to create patterns in 3D spaces
    • Produce 3D wireframes and prototypes
    • Apply UX research methodologies for design of emerging technologies 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The future of the human-machine interactions
    • The future of emerging technologies in industries
    • The future of UX design and research
    • Data as a material for the information age
    • UX aspects of AI and VI   
    • UX aspects of VR, AR, and MR
    • “Zero UI”/”no” user interface technologies
    • UX research and interface design paradigm shifts
    • Semantic workflows and design patterns in 3D spaces
    • Personality and conversational design
    • Ethical AI design and digital objects

    Coordinator
    Amii LaPointe
  
  •  

    UX 3021 - UX Research II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    UX Research II is the second class in the User Experience (UX) research sequence and builds on the foundational topics covered in UX Research I. The course takes a deep dive into advanced UX research methods and analysis of collected data through these methods. Additionally, students will learn how to choose the right research method or methods based on the product’s maturity, the development phase, and organizational constraints. Research is a core function of the field of UX to deeply understand users and their behaviors with products. Students will use both analog and digital tools to conduct research.  This is a group-based class with a balance between lecture and hands-on learning. (prereq: UX 3011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • ​Understand advanced UX research methods and its importance in creating positive user experiences and business outcomes 
    • Know how to research and analyze designs using advanced analysis techniques 
    • Understand data-driven design decisions based on UX research studies and Big Data 
    • Analyze results and present the outcomes to product stakeholders 
    • Work effectively in research teams 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Card sorting & Treejacking
    • Eye tracking
    • Click-tests
    • Multivariate (AB testing, split testing)
    • Diary studies
    • Desirability studies
    • Advanced data analysis using Function-Behavior-Structure (FBS) ontology
    • UX research in product development
    • UX Research and Big Data
    • Presenting research results

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 3025 - Data Visualization

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Data visualization is the presentation of data in a pictorial or graphical format. It enables decision makers to see analytics presented visually, so they can grasp difficult concepts or identify new patterns. Data visualization combats information overload and makes data easier to comprehend and understand complex data sets, therein making it to remember and make decisions. Furthermore, visual representations help to engage more diverse audiences in the process of analytic thinking. This form of visual communication is a highly sought-after skill as companies look to hire candidates who can present their insights clearly. Students will learn the fundamentals and best practices of data visualization analysis and take a deep dive into how the mind perceives and interprets visual information with. Data visualization strategies and approaches will be taught through a mixture of lecture, discussion, and the use of data visualization tools. (prereq: UX 1511 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know how the mind perceives and interprets visual information 
    • Recognize data visualization best practices and know how to model data in a visual manner 
    • Demonstrate knowledge in gathering, preparing, and analyzing complex data sets 
    • Apply knowledge of color, typography, and visual design practices to visualize data 
    • Explain and present the story surrounding data 
    • Show proficiency in basic functions of data visualization software to create infographics, interactive data visualizations, and data maps 

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Data research and analysis

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to data visualization and visual perception
    • Fundamentals of visualization, data modeling, and compare and contrast
    • Data visualization best practices and not-so-best practices 
    • The use of color in data visualization and dashboard design
    • Typography and data visualization design
    • Infographics, interactive data visualization, and mapping data
    • Owning your data story
    • Data visualization tool

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
  •  

    UX 3031 - Agile Product Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to expose students to the realities of agile product management through participation in a project from inception to implementation. It addresses the dynamic and fluid nature of people, product teams, and management styles, as well as the techniques used to adjust a product in real-time as a way of addressing customer needs. Emphasis is placed on “agility” as a vehicle for creating innovative, delightful products and services. (prereq: UX 3011  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an expanded vocabulary of agile product management terminology 
    • Recognize different ways to integrate UX into an agile work environment
    • Apply agile methodologies to organize and work within an agile product team 
    • Know how collaborative thinking and planning drives product development 
    • Develop proficiency in digital product management tools  
    • Adopt an agile mindset 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations of collaborative design or teamwork 

    Course Topics
    • Overview of the agile project management industry in comparison to traditional management styles
    • The relationship between customer satisfaction and embracing continuous delivery to rapidly respond to customer and company needs
    • Agile Manifesto
    • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®), Scrum, and Kanban
    • How UX fits into Agile
    • Ideation through sketching and lean UX techniques
    • Getting businesspeople and developers to work collaboratively
    • Creating and managing a product backlog
    • Building products around motivated people
    • The need for face-to-face conversations
    • Agile processes and sustainable development
    • How technical excellence and good design enhances agility and product usability

    Coordinator
    Amii LaPointe
  
  •  

    UX 3035 - Conversation Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Chatbots, which include voice assistants like Amazon Alexa and Google Home, have seen an unprecedented growth in the last decade due to their wide applications in business, marketing, customer support, and eCommerce. Today the voice revolution continues to change the ways people interact with technology. Yet voice interface design is still in its nascent stage due to the inherent complexity of human language.  The goal of this course is to cover best practices in making voice assistants more intuitive and user-friendly through conversation design. Conversation design is approached as a synthesis of several design disciplines, including user interface design, interaction design, information architecture, UX writing, and linguistics. Students gain a foundation knowledge of conversation design components, principles, and process.   (prereq: GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and UX 2031 , UX 3011 , and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Be familiar with the history and applications of chatbots 
    • Understand the benefits and limitations of voice design 
    • Demonstrate knowledge of specifics of voice design 
    • Be familiar with job prospects for conversation designers  
    • Demonstrate awareness of the best industry practices in conversation design 
    • Become proficient in conversation design fundamentals
    • Contribute a conversation design sample of work to UX 4410  - Digital Portfolio 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • User interface design
    • Interaction design
    • UX writing
    • UX research 

    Course Topics
    • History and applications of voice assistants    
    • Conversation design guides in industry (e.g., Google, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft)
    • Conversation design styles  
    • Conversation design process
    • Conversation design principles 
    • Linguistic aspects of conversation design 
    • Conversational components 
    • Error handling
    • Visual components of conversation design 
    • Conversation design scalability across platforms/devices  

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 3045 - SEO and Analytics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This class will cover components of algorithms across SEO and algorithm-driven design, including crawlability, keywords, tagging, geographical influence, external linking, and goals. The course will cover how algorithms impact content internally, as well as external findability. Students will begin with a brief history of search algorithms and how modern search algorithms differ, focusing on personalization, user needs, locale influence, and other internal and external factors that influence search results. Students will leverage concepts in algorithm-driven design (including changing UI paradigms, assets, content, personalization, graphic design, and other disciplines) in a research project focused on SEO or analytics. (prereq: UX 3011  and BA 2015 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know the history and application of search algorithms in design and content retrieval 
    • Explain the components of algorithms across search engines
    • Demonstrate knowledge of algorithm-driven design
    • Understand and be able to recognize the internal and external impact of algorithms 
    • Apply concepts of algorithm-driven design in a research project 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic research methods
    • Ability to create and leverage an analytics strategy

    Course Topics
    • History of search algorithms 
    • Overview of common algorithms 
    • How algorithms influence SEO
    • Content and UX strategies to positively influence SEO
    • Introduction to algorithm-driven design 
    • How AI is changing the traditional responsibilities in UX
    • Analytics strategies for SEO and algorithm-driven design

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 4011 - UX Senior Project I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This is the first of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as an agile team on a significant User Experience (UX) project. Throughout this sequence, each student team must research, analyze, design, and validate a product working alongside a client within an agile framework. The focus of this course will be to define the project problem, scope, and users by employing a variety of UX research methods and early design techniques. The work completed in this class is the springboard for Senior Project II and Senior Project III. Teams meet regularly with the clients and instructor to track project progress and mitigate issues. (prereq: senior standing, successful completion of all required UX and TC courses, and major GPA of at least 2.0)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Ability to self-organize team within an agile framework and demonstrate an agile mindset
    • Effectively communicate within and outside team in both oral and written form
    • Create and manage product backlog, capturing requirements through user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Use both digital and analog tools to conduct research and design product
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support research and design efforts
    • Develop and execute research to minimize uncertainty and use the results to justify design decisions
    • Employ UX processes to develop product

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in UX research methods and design techniques

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements
    • Team status meetings
    • Oral team presentations

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
  •  

    UX 4021 - UX Senior Project II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as an agile team on a significant User Experience (UX) project. Throughout this sequence, each student team must research, analyze, design, and validate a product working alongside a client within an agile framework. The focus of this course will be to create designs based on the project definition, scope, and research conducted in Senior Project I. The work completed in this class defines the work for Senior Project III. Teams meet regularly with the clients and instructor to track project progress and mitigate issues. (prereq: UX 4011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Ability to self-organize team within an agile framework and demonstrate an agile mindset
    • Effectively communicate within and outside team in both oral and written form
    • Create and manage product backlog, capturing requirements through user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Use both digital and analog tools to conduct research and design product
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support research and design efforts
    • Identify opportunities to conduct further research to validate proposed designs, minimize uncertainty, and use the results to justify design decisions
    • Employ UX processes to develop product
    • Ability to lead and actively participate in design sessions 
    • Create and iterate designs using wireframes, low-fidelity, high-fidelity, and interactive prototypes

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in UX research methods and design techniques

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings
    • Running design sessions
    • Oral team presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  •  

    UX 4031 - UX Senior Project III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This is the third of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as an agile team on a significant User Experience (UX) project. Throughout this sequence, each student team must research, analyze, design, and validate a product working alongside a client within an agile framework. The focus of this course will be to work closely with clients and team to execute work completed in Senior Project II. The work completed in Senior Project III will culminate in a final presentation of work completed in Senior Project I, II, & III, focusing on achieved business value. Teams meet regularly with the clients and instructor to track project progress and mitigate issues. (prereq: UX 4021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Ability to self-organize team within an agile framework and demonstrate an agile mindset
    • Effectively communicate within and outside team in both oral and written form
    • Create and manage product backlog, capturing requirements through user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Use both digital and analog tools to conduct research and design product
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support research and design efforts
    • Identify opportunities to conduct further research to minimize uncertainty and use the results to justify design decisions
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks
    • Verify and validate that product functions as expected
    • Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities related to product and make informed judgments that account for global, economic, environmental, and/or societal contexts
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects in a public forum with a focus on business value

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in UX research methods and design techniques

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings
    • Senior Design Show presentation (final exam week)
    • Oral team presentations

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova

  
  •  

    UX 4410 - Digital Portfolio

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Digital portfolios show your professional digital identity and are critical for entry into your career as a User Experience (UX) professional. Digital portfolios typically provide multiple samples of work presented in a case study format, display technical and professional skillsets, and demonstrate mastery of UX core competencies. In this class you will create a digital portfolio, which is a culmination of your course work that showcases your accomplishments achieved throughout your academic career. To do this, you will explore what it means to be a UX professional by building your brand, personal narrative, and then apply it to your resume, video profile, and case studies.  Your portfolio will be also be shared and presented to the UX Program Director, UX faculty, and UX Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) for review and assessment. (prereq: senior standing) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Show UX competences, personal accomplishments, and career readiness 
    • Demonstrate proficiency in knowledge and application of UX design and research principles 
    • Demonstrate knowledge and application of professional software 
    • Show advanced UX and technical writing skills 
    • Enhance learning by reflecting on skills and analyzing academic and career goals 
    • Create customized presentation of samples of work using a web-based portfolio tool 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Advanced presentation skills
    • Advanced UX and technical writing skills

    Course Topics
    • Build a personal narrative and brand that translates to resumes, portfolios, videos, and overall digital presence 
    • Develop an elevator pitch that can be utilized in networking and job applications 
    • Analyze a job description for personal fit and competency 
    • Learn how to network by interviewing people in the UX industry 
    • Build portfolio pieces and case studies 
    • Build a digital portfolio that appropriately reflects your skills, competencies, work, brand, and personal narrative 
    • Reflect, holistically, on what it means to be a UX professional and explore aspects of the field that fit your specific UX interests and expertise.

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katie Panciera

English as a Second Language

  
  •  

    GS 1001E - Freshman Studies I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course emphasizes close reading of “texts,” including not only printed materials but also art, photographs, maps, film, music, and other documents. At the same time, this course requires students to shift focus from the “micro” level of a text to the “macro” level of its context in a way that allows them to understand a problem in terms of the larger system(s) of which it is part. Critical thinking skills are developed as students interpret and synthesize these “micro” and “macro” elements of text and context. Similarly, personal growth is encouraged as students make connections between course material and their own experiences, beliefs, and values. A primary course focus will be rhetorical strategies for communicating ideas clearly, concisely, and correctly. Students will engage in some form of civic activity in the form of experiential learning that involves the larger community and society outside of MSOE. Thematic subject matter varies by instructor. (prereq: for ESL students only)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary social issues, cultural perspectives, and historical perspectives
    • Communicate information, ideas, and results via written means
    • Demonstrate aesthetic engagement through exposure to literature, philosophy, and the arts
    • Demonstrate expectations of responsible citizenship (civic engagement)
    • Demonstrate understanding of how knowledge is derived in the humanities and social sciences
    • Exercise critical thinking skills in an interdisciplinary context
    • Demonstrate understanding of basic documentation and citation of sources

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the disciplines of the humanities and social sciences (2 classes)
    • Discussion of rhetorical concepts and the role of synthesis as a meaning-making tool in the humanities (2 classes) 
    • Tour of Grohmann Museum and/or other cultural institutions (1 class)
    • Student analysis and discussion of art (2 classes)
    • Classroom activities/discussions, film viewing, field trips, etc., exploring subject materials related to the selected course topic-for example, “sustainability,” “globalization,” etc. (10 classes)
    • Analysis and interpretation of assigned readings from course texts, including rhetorical analysis of texts (10 classes)
    • Discussion/exercises on research methods in the humanities and social sciences (2 classes)
    • Writing workshops (10 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
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    GS 1002E - Freshman Studies II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the principles of report structure and professional documentation. Students are also introduced to collaborative writing strategies and given opportunities to practice this skill. College-level research strategies are introduced, with emphasis on locating appropriate sources, evaluating sources in terms of quality and bias, and citing and documenting sources correctly. Data analysis and techniques for visual representation of data to communicate meaning effectively will also be emphasized. Student research will be focused in an area related to the thematic subject matter of their particular section. Student research projects will address specific real-world problems and opportunities in a way that situates their work within the larger civic or professional context outside of the classroom. Thematic subject matter varies by instructor. (prereq: for ESL students only)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Produce professional quality documents-specifically report structure and document design
    • Access and organize information
    • Evaluate and analyze collected information
    • Communicate information, ideas, and results effectively via visual means
    • Produce coherent collaboratively written documents
    • Demonstrate expectations of responsible citizenship (civic engagement)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Rhetorical principles of technical communication
    • Principles of document design
    • Ethical considerations in technical communication
    • Report structure and organization
    • Research methods, working with both primary and secondary sources
    • Visual representation of data
    • Lectures, discussions, activities related to selected-topic subject material
    • Principles of effective slideshows and speaking/presentation strategies
    • Formal oral presentations with visual support
    • Collaborative writing strategies and practice
    • Writing workshops, including collaborative projects

    Coordinator
    Katie Toske
  
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    IG 100 - Intensive Grammar I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The Pre-Intermediate Academic Intensive Grammar course is the first in a four-part, integrated course sequence of our Intensive Grammar curriculum.  It has direct application to all four-language skills. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach grammatical concepts to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • The “be” verb
    • The simple past, present, future, and progressive tenses
    • Imperatives and modals
    • Nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns
    • Articles, demonstratives and quantifiers
    • Time clauses and conjunctions

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 200 - Intensive Grammar II

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The Intermediate Academic Intensive Grammar course is the second in a four-part, integrated course sequence of our Intensive Grammar curriculum.  It has direct application to all four-language skills. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach grammatical concepts to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The simple past, present, future, progressive, and perfect tenses
    • Imperatives and modals
    • Nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns
    • Articles
    • Time clauses and future conditionals
    • Gerunds and infinitives
    • Relative clauses
    • Conjunctions and adverb clauses

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 201 - Intermediate Intensive Grammar I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This core course is the first of six contextualized intensive grammar courses with direct application in all four-language skills including an online component for additional practice in vocabulary and writing skills. It includes the present and past tenses, nouns, determiners, pronouns, present perfect, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and the simple future. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach a grammatical concept to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The present
    • The past
    • Nouns, determiners and pronouns
    • The present perfect
    • Adjectives, adverbs and prepositions

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 300 - Intensive Grammar III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The Upper-Intermediate Academic Intensive Grammar course is the third in a four-part, integrated course sequence of our Intensive Grammar curriculum.  It has direct application to all four-language skills. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach grammatical concepts to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • A review of the simple past, present, future, progressive, and perfect tenses
    • Imperatives and modals
    • Nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns
    • Articles
    • Time clauses and future conditionals
    • Gerunds and infinitives
    • Relative clauses
    • Conjunctions and adverb clauses

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 301 - Upper-Intermediate Intensive Grammar III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This core course is the third of six contextualized intensive grammar courses with direct application in all four-language skills including an online component for additional practice in vocabulary and writing skills. It includes the present and past, the perfect, the future, modals and modal-like expressions, nouns and pronouns, gerunds and infinitives, negative questions and tag questions. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach a grammatical concept to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • The present and the past
    • The perfect
    • The future
    • Modals and modal-like expressions
    • Nouns and pronouns
    • Gerunds and infinitives
    • Questions and noun clauses

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 400 - Intensive Grammar IV

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The Advanced Academic Intensive Grammar course is the last in a four-part, integrated course sequence of our Intensive Grammar curriculum.  It has direct application to all four-language skills, with a heavy emphasis on writing. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach grammatical concepts to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Cause and effect
    • Comparison and contrast
    • Narrative
    • Classification and definition
    • Problem-solution
    • Summary-response
    • Persuasion

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IG 401 - Advanced Intensive Grammar V

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    This core course is the fifth of six contextualized intensive grammar courses with direct application to the research paper writing process and different writing purposes. It incorporates more advanced and complex grammatical structures to cause and effect, comparison and contrast, and narrative essays. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures at college-level writing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to oral and written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Master and teach a grammatical concept to the class
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Cause and effect
    • Comparison and contrast
    • Narrative

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
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    IG 500 - Intensive Grammar Application

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds on foundational grammar skills to improve common errors in academic writing and speaking. It includes the present, the past, the perfect, the future, modals and modal-like expressions, nouns and pronouns, gerunds and infinitives, noun clauses, indirect speech, the passive, relative clauses, conditionals, and connecting ideas. Emphasis is given to avoiding and identifying most common grammar usage mistakes with explicit application of target structures in writing. Students use the targeted grammar to read, write, listen to, and speak about current events.  At the end of this course, students should be better prepared to accurately use English grammatical structures to participate academic speaking and writing tasks at a university level. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and apply English grammar rules to in and out of class activities
    • Apply knowledge of grammar to written tasks
    • Recognize, categorize, and correct grammatical errors in your own writing and the writing of others
    • Recognize grammatical structure used in current event oral and written reports
    • Lead a discussion using appropriate and targeted grammar concepts
    • Demonstrate knowledge of grammatical concepts on in-class assessments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IW 100 - Intensive Writing I: The Paragraph

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Intensive Writing I is designed to provide a solid foundation in writing skills by aiding students to write and rewrite well-organized, coherent and accurate paragraphs. Emphasis is given to brainstorming, organization of ideas, and analysis of paragraph samples. Autonomy is encouraged through the use of rubrics and peer feedback checklists to encourage collaboration and self-editing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the rationale for a multi-step writing process
    • Brainstorm and organize ideas to prepare a foundation for structured writing
    • Implement and use editing symbols for revision
    • Describe personality in writing
    • Characterize a person with ordered detail in a paragraph
    • Narrate a short story with ideas and relevant detail
    • Use transitions to effectively tell a story
    • Peer-review and self-edit paragraphs for grammar and style
    • Write about a scary or funny experience
    • Identify good and bad topic sentences, support and concluding sentences in paragraphs
    • Focus on aspect and tense to tell stories
    • Describe place with accurate prepositions
    • Develop and support an opinion in short written work

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IW 200 - Intensive Writing II: The Short Composition

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Intensive Writing II is designed to provide a solid foundation in writing skills by aiding students to refine and develop coherent and accurate multi-paragraph compositions. Emphasis is given to supplying details to build the paragraphs within the compositions using parallel points relevant to each topic. Autonomy is encouraged through the use of rubrics and peer feedback checklists to encourage collaboration and self-editing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use details to support main ideas
    • Outline relevant supporting ideas for short compositions
    • Give and receive peer-feedback on written work
    • Support writing with examples and background
    • Revise and edit personal writing for grammatical accuracy and content
    • Structure and support an outline using parallel supporting points and successive main ideas
    • Interpret and describe figurative language devices by clustering and outlining
    • Avoid verbosity in written work
    • Write an accurate and concise summary of fiction and non-fiction
    • Use the “literary Present Tense” in narrative and summary
    • Express an opinion by formal response to a non-fiction work
    • Critique a fiction work in writing 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    IW 300 - Intensive Writing III: The Essay

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Intensive Writing III is designed to provide a solid foundation in writing skills by aiding students to refine and develop coherent and accurate essays. Emphasis is given to the application of critical thinking and personal experience in addition to adherence to the writing process. This class will target explanatory, comparison, problem-solution, argumentative and response essay structures, as well as give students practice in timed-essay writing. Autonomy is encouraged through the use of rubrics and peer feedback checklists to encourage collaboration and self-editing. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define and understand the purpose of an essay
    • Identify an audience and choose an appropriate topic 
    • Narrow or broaden the scope of a topic to effectively outline an essay
    • Expedite various brainstorming techniques such as listing, free-writing, and using graphic organizers and diagrams
    • Recognize and explain the relative strength or weakness of a thesis statement
    • Outline and order ideas for expansion in different essay types
    • Draft, edit, polish, and produce formal written work, including essays of explanation, problem-solution, comparison-contrast, persuasion, and response to a reading
    • Outline and write a strong academic essay under a given time constraint
    • Implement self and peer editing strategies for formal writing
    • Use different hedging techniques to avoid over-generalization
    • Accurately paraphrase, summarize, and quote an author’s work, using correct and appropriate citation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
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    LS 100 - Academic Listening and Speaking I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Listening and Speaking I is the first in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic listening, speaking, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including education, business, and sociology. This course enhances students’ understanding of American culture and university life by engaging them in listening to everyday conversations on a college campus as well as authentic academic lectures. They will work to uncover the “mechanics” of speaking and listening by analyzing pronunciation and intonation patterns, as well as common English phrases. Students will actively take place in various types of discourse in class, such as formal and informal small group discussions and presentations. They will also participate in events on campus and in the community where they will further develop their speaking and listening skills. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Listening:

    • Listen for topics and main ideas
    • Listen for reasons, examples, and specific information
    • Listen for causes, effects, and solutions to problems
    • Guess the meaning of words from context
    • Use a variety of strategies to take and organize notes

    Academic Speaking:

    • Describe preferences and interests
    • Ask for and give permission and advice
    • Ask for and give an opinion
    • Keep a conversation going
    • Clearly pronounce key vowel and consonant sounds

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
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    LS 200 - Academic Listening and Speaking II

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Listening and Speaking II is the second in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic listening, speaking, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including business, biology, and U.S history. This course enhances students’ understanding of American culture and university life by engaging them in listening to everyday conversations on a college campus as well as authentic academic lectures.  They will work to uncover the “mechanics” of speaking and listening by analyzing pronunciation and intonation patterns, as well as common English phrases. Students will actively take place in various types of discourse in class, such as formal and informal small group discussions and presentations. They will also participate in events on campus and in the community where they will further develop their speaking and listening skills. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Listening:

    • Get the main ideas from an introduction
    • Listen for supporting information
    • Listen for categories and definitions
    • Make inferences after listening
    • Include details in your notes

    Academic Speaking:

    • Ask for and give directions
    • Change statements into questions
    • Give reasons and examples
    • Agree and disagree with others’ opinions
    • Clearly pronounce key vowel and consonant sounds

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  •  

    LS 201 - Intermediate Academic Listening and Speaking I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Intermediate Academic Listening and Speaking I core course is the first of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas and built-in academic vocabulary workshops. The listening strand focuses on taking notes using graphic organizers and outlines, knowing when to take notes, supporting information, anecdotes, emotion and tone, previewing, and details. The speaking strand develops critical speaking strategies such as asking and answering comparison and clarification questions, giving advice, pre-planning, verbal and non-verbal communication and expressions of disbelief and skepticism. Interpreting information on tables, literal and figurative meaning, brainstorming, inference and point of view are critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include guessing meaning from context, making predictions, and listening for stressed words. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Speaking

    • Produce common English expressions to ask for and give directions, advice, and clarification
    • Greet and respond to a greeting using reduced forms of words
    • Agree and disagree with negative questions using phrases to express disbelief and skepticism
    • Pronounce the phonemes /θ/and /s/correctly when speaking
    • Research and analyze two colleges or universities and give an 2-3 minute informative presentation comparing the two*
    • Interview three people about a product you designed and outline a 3-5 minute presentation to “sell” the product to your audience*
    • Interpret the meaning of different forms of non-verbal communication by collecting information and having a small group discussion*

    *At least two (2) of these objectives will be met each session

    Academic Listening

    • Recognize the medial T and the difference between the phonemes /θ/and /s/
    • Identify emotion from a speaker’s tone of voice
    • Interpret the meaning of interjections and the difference between a statement and a question through listening for intonation
    • Understand and compare a speaker’s point of view in a radio program and a lecture
    • Use an outline and graphic organizer to organize notes from an academic lecture
    • Prepare for a lecture by predicting its contents and learning new vocabulary
    • Listen for details, supporting information, a causal chain, anecdotes, and unstressed words in radio broadcasts and academic lectures   

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  •  

    LS 300 - Academic Listening and Speaking III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Listening and Speaking III is the third in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic listening, speaking, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including global business, art, psychology, and health. This course enhances students’ understanding of American culture and university life by engaging them in listening to everyday conversations on a college campus as well as authentic academic lectures. They will work to uncover the “mechanics” of speaking and listening by analyzing pronunciation and intonation patterns, as well as common English phrases. Students will actively take place in various types of discourse in class, such as formal and informal small group discussions and presentations. They will also participate in events on campus and in the community where they will further develop their speaking and listening skills. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Listening:

    • Listen for main ideas and meaning of terms
    • Listen for examples, differences, comparisons, causes, and effects
    • Notice topic change signals
    • Guess the meaning of words from context
    • Use a variety of strategies to take and organize notes

    Academic Speaking:

    • Ask for and give clarification and confirmation
    • Participate in a panel discussion
    • Interpret symbols
    • Present a persuasive argument
    • Clearly pronounce key vowel and consonant sounds

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

 

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