Feb 23, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business Administration

  
  • BA 2710 - Database Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will be introduced to the concepts of relational database management systems. Students will learn how write database queries using SQL to answer questions and support business analysis. Additionally, students will learn basic database design methods (normalization) and develop and implement a relational database.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the role of databases and database management systems within an organization
    • Identify and explain basic database concepts, including the structure and operation of a relational database
    • Write SQL queries to extract and manipulate data
    • Design and implement a simple relational database

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Some familiarity with computing
    • Knowledge of a programming language

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 2712 - Advanced Database Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on advanced database programming techniques and explores general topics in relational database administration. Students will demonstrate the practical application of database security management and develop database scripts, triggers, and stored procedures. (prereq: BA 2710 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the application of database constraints, indices, and views
    • Create database triggers, scripts, and stored procedures
    • Describe key database administration concepts
    • Demonstrate database security techniques

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 2720 - Systems Analysis and Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the key practices involved in identifying, describing, selecting and implementing technology systems within a business environment.  The course explores multiple system development methodologies with a focus on feasibility assessment, requirements analysis, the system procurement process and implementation strategies.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe various system design methodologies
    • Explain key phases of systems analysis and design including specific activities and deliverables
    • Evaluate technical, operational, and economic feasibility of systems projects
    • Analyze business process and develop business process maps
    • Demonstrate various systems requirements gathering and documentation techniques
    • Understand the software procurement process and develop Request for Proposal documents
    • Understand system implementation considerations with an emphasis on testing techniques

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 2730 - Business Programming I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of application program development through the construction of computer programs that address typical business needs.  The elements of data processing and program development are learned through the hands-on process of building software solutions to common business problems. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a process for creating software solutions to typical business problems
    • Demonstrate the ability to analyze, design, implement, and test programs written to address a business problem
    • Understand the syntax and semantics of a programming language to craft solutions that can be reduced to programs
    • Develop the ability to design an algorithm, protocol, or process using purely logic structures
    • Understand the various types of data used in computing and how to process that data to provide information to a client

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Knowledge of college algebra
    • Knowledge of web basics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 2732 - Business Programming II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuing from Business Programming I, students will further develop analysis and design skills in object-oriented programming to address business problems.  Emphasis is placed on enhancing class authorship skills using object-oriented programming techniques such as: inheritance, polymorphism, interfaces, event models, collections, class libraries, and other application programming. (prereq: BA 2730 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Continue to develop personal software process to solve typical computing problems in business
    • Demonstrate how data structures, collections and other containers are used to process objects
    • Understand how inheritance and polymorphism work together to solve increasingly complex problems in software development
    • Learn how interfaces are used to support multiple clients without exposing underlying implementation details
    • Create graphical user interfaces using standard components (windows, frames, buttons, panels, etc.)
    • Learn how to use the event model to create interactive applications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Knowledge of Java language syntax and semantics
    • Knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts
    • Knowledge of basic programming logic and design

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 2850 - Topics in Artificial Intelligence: A Hands-on Approach

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the basic concepts of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in a manner designed to attract newcomers to the field who are curious about AI.  Tools, techniques, and devices from laboratories in the Diercks Center for Artificial Intelligence will be used to develop solutions using robotics, computer vision, machine learning, and natural language processing.  Students will experiment with aerial drones, virtual reality, and augmented reality systems to address problems across multiple engineering and business disciplines. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of formal logic, including propositional and first order logic, inference, rule-based deduction, and resolution
    • Solve problems using search techniques such as depth-first, breadth-first, forward chaining, backward chaining, heuristic search, and adversarial search
    • Understand game theory and game-playing strategies using AI, such as Minimax search, alpha-beta pruning, and back propagation of errors
    • Use tools and techniques common in AI for discovery, including Jupyter Notebooks, the Python programming language, and neural network frameworks such as NVIDIA Caffe and TensorFlow
    • Understand the application of machine learning and deep neural networks to discovery of new knowledge and information

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 3015 - Business Analytics II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds on the foundations from BA 1015 and BA 2015, exploring the field of business analytics. Students will gain experience using exploratory and predictive analytic models, as well as using key performance indicators, dashboards, and scorecards to communicate business performance and assess growth opportunities. Through case studies, students will apply data mining and visualization techniques and create meaningful displays of quantitative and qualitative data to facilitate managerial decision making. (prereq: BA 2015 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify types of decision-making scenarios and the analytic techniques and tools available to support them
    • Evaluate data mining algorithms and effectively apply them to a given business scenario
    • Design data presentations and visualizations to support stakeholder needs
    • Demonstrate application of ethical principles in analyzing business scenarios for decision making

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires foundational knowledge covered in BA 2015

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3411 - Leading Project Teams

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the sociocultural dimensions of project management and explores how to identify, build, lead, and motivate project teams to achieve organizational objectives. Special attention is paid to processes to build and develop teams; students will learn to recognize and leverage different personalities and perspectives, resolve conflict, negotiate with stakeholders, and plan and facilitate problem solving, decision making and planning meetings through the use of effective communication strategies. Another critical aspect of project leadership is knowing how to advocate on behalf of your project to champion organizational change. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe individual styles and preferences and how they impact project teams; develop personal style flexibility
    • Build the project team and develop team processes, norms, and roles appropriate for project work
    • Identify, prioritize, and manage project stakeholders; create informational and persuasive communication to secure understanding and support for project team
    • Diagnose challenging situations in teambuilding and respond with appropriate communication strategies
    • Assess individual and team performance and develop improvement plans
    • Recognize barriers and drivers for organizational change and apply appropriate change strategies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Kristin Shebesta
  
  • BA 3423 - Innovation and Business Markets

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course explores the foundation, functions and models of businesses based on innovation, creativity and value production. Course topics include (a) generation of commercializable new ideas in both new ventures and existing organizations; (b) challenges to organizations based on creativity and innovation; (c) trade-offs in making resource allocation decisions innovative ideas; and (d) strategies for businesses based on fast-changing creative and innovative products. The course features guest speakers and includes assignments involving entrepreneurship and business development. Students will develop an understanding for the steps and strategies needed to move innovative ideas to commercial success. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply the concepts and tools related to innovation, commercialization and entrepreneurship
    • Know how a typical business plan, a license agreement or technology development proposal is structured
    • Describe strategies to finance technology development and commercialization
    • Demonstrate knowledge of intellectual property rights, market research, accounting, finance and entrepreneurial management
    • Gain skills in communication, public speaking and team building
    • Understand and communicate their role as engineer, scientist or manager in shaping an innovation-driven economy

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Gene Wright
  
  • BA 3440 - Business Communication and Commerce

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Class activities will emphasize communication in real-world business situations and enable students to begin developing their ability to write and speak effectively in the workplace.  The class will introduce various types of professional communication, with an emphasis on business writing (email and memo), as well as communication in business situations. Students will gain experience writing and revising business email, letters, proposals, and job search documents. The study of business communication enables the comprehension of soft skills within commerce. Aside from understanding the core principles of business communications as a study, you will learn how to effectively comprehend, position, and deliver messages within various disciplines. Students will exit the course with a clear understanding of the centrality of communication in business. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the principles and theories involved in constructing business correspondence in different media
    • Design and write effective business correspondence to various audiences
    • Demonstrate competency in communication across different platforms
    • Understand the legal and ethical dimensions impacting effective global and cultural communication

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 3444 - Organizational Behavior and Leadership

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students will explore the challenges in organizations in terms of the interaction between human beings, groups, and the organizational contexts within which they work. This course combines the multidiscipline approaches of psychology, sociology, anthropology, and management to understand, predict, and manage behavior in organizations. The primary goal of this course is to understand the ways individuals, groups, organizational structures, and culture impact an organization’s effectiveness and how an organization impacts all of those concepts in return. Specific attention will be given to organizational behaviors, individual differences, employee fit, foundations of group behavior, communication, power and politics, culture, and change management. (prereq: sophomore standing) (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define Organizational Behavior (OB) and explain its significance.
    • Analyze individual human behavior in a workplace setting considering perceptions, personality, attitudes, development, and diversity.
    • Understand the elements of group behavior in an organization including group dynamics, teamwork, communication, power & politics, conflict, and leadership.
    • Define motivation and its influences through root causes, theoretical models, and scenario mapping. Motivation will be explored through individuals, group dynamics, training and development and the influence motivation and engagement has on performance in organizations.
    • Review models of organizational structure and how they impact culture, communication, corporate efficiency, strategy, and how corporations align with, or adapt to, external factors.
    • Compare individual, group and organizational behaviors together to understand, manage, and predict behaviors at all three levels based on scenario settings.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 3447 - Leadership

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Leadership is an essential aspect for professional and career development.  This course is designed to introduce students to the tasks, strategies, and skills of effective leadership. Course activities will move the student from theory to the practical processes of leadership. Basic concepts essential to personal skills development and organizational leadership behavior are included. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Evaluate and identify individual leadership strengths and weaknesses
    • Develop leadership communication strategies across various business situations
    • Understand theories of leadership and motivation to apply in business situations
    • Apply ethical standards when dealing with leadership in organizations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic knowledge of business required

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 3491 - Supply Chain Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course exposes students to the flow of materials and information from suppliers to customers in manufacturing and service firms. Topics will include the use of technology, the challenges with an international supply chain, and the various strategies for designing effective supply chains. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain and describe the advantages and disadvantages of technology in the supply chain
    • Describe the sources of variability within a supply chain and strategies to mitigate variability
    • Describe the roles and value of each layer in a supply chain.
    • Describe the metrics that can be used to measure the performance of a supply chain
    • Explain the difference between tactical and strategic decision making in supply chain management

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Thomas Eberle
  
  • BA 3580 - Managerial Accounting and Costing

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Introduces the student to the business concepts and methods used to report managerial performance information to internal users and to assist managers in making sound business decisions in managing the firm. This course will help the student understand the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting (prereq: BA 2530 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Compare costing method including job order, process costing, and activity-based costing systems
    • Evaluate, communicate, and prepare managerial accounting information in the appropriate format
    • Classify and analyze the various types of costs and track the flow of costs in a manufacturing company
    • Interpret cost behaviors for decision making
    • Evaluate the ethical dimensions of managerial accounting

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The manager and managerial accounting
    • Cost terminology review
    • Cost volume profit analysis review
    • Job costing
    • Process costing
    • Flexible budgets, direct cost variance and management control
    • Flexible budgets, overhead cost variances and management control
    • Inventory costing and capacity analysis
    • Determining how costs behave
    • Decision making and relevant information

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 3591 - Intermediate Accounting

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will provide a deep dive into financial accounting, including relevant theory and practical application. (prereq: BA 2505 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prepare and analyze financial statements for a complex organization
    • Identify and prepare complex accounting transactions
    • Apply costing and pricing methodology
    • Describe key elements of an internal control system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires knowledge of concepts covered in BA 2505  

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 3593 - Intermediate Finance

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will provide an overview of corporate finance including relevant theory and practical application. (prereq: BA 2505 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the common factors influencing dividend policy
    • Describe applications of derivatives in financial markets and calculate their value
    • Identify key financial elements in merger and acquisition decisions, including business valuation
    • Apply risk and return model to financial decisions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    Requires knowledge of concepts from BA 2505  
    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 3595 - Intermediate Accounting II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide the students with in-depth exposure to the United States and international accounting environments and all the elements of the theoretical frameworks that comprises. In this continuation of Intermediate Accounting, the students will learn to apply this accounting theory to the balance sheet. (prereq: BA 2530 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prepare and analyze financial statements for a complex organization, focusing on the balance sheet and statement of equity
    • Identify, prepare, and analyze complex accounting transactions
    • Describe the financial reporting environment and theory related to the topics under study
    • Identify and differentiate between requirements under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) for all elements of the financial statements under study

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Judgment and applied financial accounting research
    • Statements of financial position and cash flows and the annual report
    • Cash and receivables
    • Inventory
    • Long-term assets
    • Long-term assets: departures from historic cost
    • Operating liabilities and contingencies
    • Financing liabilities
    • Accounting for stockholders’ equity
    • Investing in financial assets

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 3630 - Social Media Marketing Strategies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    From social networks to prosumer content and mobile applications, marketing in the digital age is markedly different than in the past. Students in this course will get hands-on experience with many of today’s cutting-edge social and digital marketing tools, learn to critique and create digital marketing strategies, and participate in exploratory assignments to test out the theories that make these tools work. Students will read about the functional theories related to social media, including network theory, game theory, and collective intelligence, and will then engage in experiencing these theories in action firsthand, building to a campaign of their own design. This course includes a full survey of digital marketing approaches from email to augmented reality, with an emphasis on matching technology to specific marketing goals. Students in the course must be willing to create accounts on various social media tools. (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the ethical issues related to using social media marketing and its impact on businesses
    • Effectively use the major social media marketing portals to promote a company, brand, product, service, or person
    • Evaluate a company’s current situation, isolate social media issues, and provide solutions by identifying appropriate social media marketing portals to influence consumers and improve the company’s reputation
    • Create a social media marketing plan including KPIs and metrics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires basic marketing knowledge from BA 2661

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 3710 - Operating Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents modern computer operating systems concepts from a design and development perspective. Beginning with the understanding of computer hardware and software, a component-based model of how operating system software controls computer hardware is presented. The interaction between hardware and software is emphasized in representing units of work to be run on both single and multi-processor architectures. Special emphasis is placed on concurrent and parallel threads of execution on modern multicore architectures. Resource management policies and the tradeoffs inherent in design decisions are illustrated with case studies analyzing Microsoft Windows, Unix/Linux/Solaris and other operating systems. (prereq: BA 2730 , BA 3715 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have a working knowledge of computer system hardware and architecture
    • Understand software architecture from an operating systems perspective
    • Develop an understanding of process models, threads, and their importance in computer systems
    • Develop an understanding of concurrency, parallelism, and synchronization among parallel threads
    • Understand resource management (memory, file systems, networks) in computer systems and the applicability to business operations
    • Understand the tradeoffs between complexity and performance when analyzing policy decisions made by operating system designers

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Knowledge, understanding, and familiarity with computer programming languages
    • Knowledge of an object-oriented programming language

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3715 - Infrastructure Architecture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will learn key concepts within organizational information technology infrastructure such as processors, interfaces, disks, controllers, and network components. They will be introduced to infrastructure configuration, administration, and management principles.  Course topics include server architecture models, virtualization, storage networks, network configuration and management, backup and recovery, and security. Measures of availability, reliability, and performance will be discussed.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Summarize typical server architecture models and their application within a business environment
    • Compare and contrast architecture management techniques and their application within a business environment
    • Compare and contrast storage network architectures for a given business need
    • Describe the building blocks of networks and various configurations of these components to meet business needs
    • Calculate metrics related to availability, reliability, and performance of server and storage systems and identify their importance within an organization

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3720 - Information Security and Assurance

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the key concepts of an enterprise security policy, including the identification and protection of information assets.  Emphasis is placed on determining appropriate protection of assets and response to security incidents.  The course also introduces the student to computer forensic investigations and ethical considerations in business practices. (prereq: BA 3715 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the fundamentals of information security related to an enterprise security policy
    • Identify various security threats and vulnerabilities
    • Describe access control fundamentals including authentication and account management
    • Understand and work with computer security and forensic tools to identify, monitor, and prevent unauthorized access and use
    • Understand the process and techniques used in computer investigations
    • Identify the ethical and legal considerations involved in enterprise security

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • BA 3715  is needed to understand system components and their impact on security and how assurance and security can be built into a design

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3740 - Emerging Technologies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will explore new and emerging technologies and architectures within information technology and systems. Students will evaluate technologies based on industry needs. In addition, course projects will require students to create a business case for the implementation of emerging technology. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify, research, and summarize several emerging technologies and architectures
    • Critique new and emerging technology based on application within a given scenario
    • Develop a business case for implementation of a new or emerging technology or architecture

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Foundations in systems analysis and design

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3797 - Website Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This hands-on course is designed for beginners in website design. The course will cover how to use XHTML to create web pages as well as how to incorporate Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript. Students will complete a website from start to publishing it on the Internet. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate proper use of basic HTML formatting elements (head, body, paragraph, font, bold, italics, underline, lists, tables, etc.)
    • Demonstrate proper use of hypertext HTML elements (images, anchors, links, image maps, etc.)
    • Demonstrate proper use of user interaction HTML elements (forms, input fields, buttons, menus, form submission, etc.)
    • Demonstrate proper use of HTML layout control (frames, framesets, banners navigation, content management, etc.)
    • Demonstrate proper use of Cascaded Style Sheet (CSS) elements (style attributes, style tags, and external style sheets)
    • Demonstrate proper use of basic JavaScript elements that enhance a site (buttons, alert boxes, form validation, etc.)
    • Use a standard HTML text editor (Dreamweaver, HomeSite, FrontPage, etc.) to complete course assignments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Ability to use a personal computer (typing skills, etc.)
    • Basic understanding of the Windows operating system (file management and directory structures {i.e. folders}, drag and drop, etc.)

    Course Topics
    • HTML formatting basics (standard tags for formatting text)
    • File management and web server communications (Secure SHell)
    • Hypertext HTML elements (images, anchors, links, image maps, etc.)
    • HTML tables and table data (horizontal space management)
    • Frames and frame sets in HTML (simple layout management)
    • User interaction HTML elements (forms, buttons, menus, navigation, etc.)
    • Cascaded Style Ssheet (CSS) elements
    • Separation of HTML content from CSS style into control “look and feel”
    • JavaScript elements used to enhance a web site
    • Dreamweaver basics that simplify management of all of the above

    Laboratory Topics
    • HTML formatting basics
    • HTML interactive elements
    • CSS to manage “look and feel”
    • JavaScript to enhance a web site
    • Dreamweaver basics to manage HTML, CSS, and JavaScript

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 3798 - Advanced Website Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This hands-on course is designed for website designers with some experience. The course will cover website design beyond the basics as well as how to create graphics, animation, and JavaScript form validation into an already created website. The student will enhance a pre-existing website with graphics and JavaScript while using the advanced website design techniques. Upon completion of this course, it is expected that students will be able to understand in-depth knowledge of website development; select approaches, strategies and techniques for integrating Internet technologies into the design and development of websites; and, incorporate form validation with JavaScript, animated graphics, and advanced web design techniques. (prereq: BA 3797 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Select and apply web design strategies into a pre-existing web site
    • Create a form that integrates into a site
    • Incorporate JavaScript validation to the form to insure good data is received from the form.
    • Include a customized thank you page on a site that incorporates the reading and writing of cookies using JavaScript
    • Explore Photoshop techniques for enhancing and creating images
    • Create an animated gif that integrates into a site
    • Replace table formatting with Cascading Style Sheets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • HTML, CSS, and JavaScript basics
    • Basic understanding of the Windows operating system (file management and directory structures {i.e. folders}, drag and drop, etc.)

    Course Topics
    • Website design
    • Forms
    • Form validation with JavaScript
    • Reading and writing cookies
    • Graphics
    • Animation
    • Formatting pages with Cascading Styles Sheets

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 3799 - Multimedia for Website Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This hands-on course is designed for experienced website designers interested in including multimedia on their websites.  Various approaches, strategies, and techniques for integrating multimedia technologies into websites will be presented.  Students will design and implement multimedia projects using the techniques discussed in class.  (prereq: BA 3798 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand multimedia and the issues surrounding its inclusion on websites
    • Select approaches, strategies, and techniques for integrating multimedia technologies into the design and development of websites
    • Develop websites incorporating HTML elements, animations and custom controls
    • Understand concepts required for mobile application development

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Website design
    • Forms
    • Form validation with JavaScript
    • Reading and writing cookies
    • Graphics
    • Animation
    • Formatting pages with Cascading Styles Sheets

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 3801 - Continuous Improvement I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will be introduced to quality improvement methodologies such as Plan-Do-Check-Act, Lean, and Six Sigma.  Students will learn how to apply the seven basic quality tools to business problems.  The elements of an organization quality management program will be explored, including the importance of strategic planning and stakeholder relationships in the management process. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and describe key elements of an organizational quality management program
    • Compare and contrast quality improvement methodologies
    • Demonstrate the application of basic quality tools such as process mapping, cause-and-effect diagrams, histograms, and Pareto charts
    • Apply Voice of the Customer techniques for obtaining stakeholder feedback

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3803 - Continuous Improvement II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, Lean concepts and techniques will be applied to a business problem.  Students will learn to identify what is value added and what is waste within a business process so that waste can be eliminated. Concepts such as 5S, value stream mapping, and Kaizen will be introduced and applied. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and describe the five principles of Lean thinking
    • Identify and eliminate waste within a business process
    • Apply Lean tools and techniques to improve business processes
    • Evaluate the impact of organizational culture on continuous improvement

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires knowledge of foundational quality topics

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3805 - Six Sigma Techniques

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces and requires application of the skills and tools necessary to conduct Six Sigma projects.  The tools, techniques, and information learned enable students to find ways to improve the value customers receive, generating greater success for organizations.  Primary topics include Six Sigma origins, leadership and strategic planning, customer focus, statistical methods, quality control, process capability, design of experiments, and failure modes and effects analysis. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of Six Sigma methodology and management practices
    • Solve problems using data and Six Sigma tools and techniques
    • Provide examples of business problems for which Six Sigma can be applied to improve business products, services, and operations
    • Describe the relationship between Six Sigma and organizational strategy

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires knowledge of foundational quality topics

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 3895 - International Logistics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The focus of this course is on the changing face of international logistics in the 21st century. Important elements of international logistics such as transport modes, nodes and hubs, and corridors will be covered. Within the course, students will learn the elements of the contemporary context of international logistics, including global trade production and distribution, global outsourcing, and changing patterns of international trade, as well as developments in the technologies and competencies in transportation and logistics operations. Finally, the course will examine the prevailing international trade regulatory environment and its resultant impacts on global logistical systems, facilities, and processes. (prereq: BA 3491 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain and illustrate the significance of logistics operations within a globalized context
    • Examine the key challenges and levels of risks involved in international logistics to ensure appropriate operation within global context
    • Identify and discuss the nature and role of the key parties in a global logistics chain in order to participate in a global environment
    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the various transport modes available and their characteristics in international logistics
    • Describe and explain logistics services and operations on an international scale
    • Apply international logistics knowledge and practices in international trade operations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires foundational supply chain knowledge

    Coordinator
    Thomas Eberle
  
  • BA 3998 - Business Internship

    0 lecture hours 10 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to allow the junior or senior student to receive credit for valid work experience in the student’s area of concentration under the guidance of both a faculty member and a representative of a cooperating firm. The expectation is the student’s work experience will extend and/or intensify the student’s understanding of a chosen field of study. Internship students are expected to take enough additional course work during their internship to continue to maintain full-time student status. (prereq: junior standing and consent of advisor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the practical skills developed during the internship that relate to their specialization of study
    • Gain knowledge of the organizational structure and integration of processes within the business
    • Critique the challenges managers face and overcome in a business environment
    • Illustrate some essential soft skills needed for a successful career within a work environment of customers and colleagues

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Gene Wright
  
  • BA 4330 - Legal Aspects of Innovation and Entrepreneurship:

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will focus on topics important and interesting to anyone involved with managing or creating technology. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of fundamental legal issues pertinent to technology management. The course focuses on a wide range of controversial issues regarding intellectual property rights (i.e. patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets) and addresses strategic decision making such as how to protect computer and internet projects. A seminar approach will be followed with student participation expected. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop an appreciation and (hopefully) enjoyment of the wonderful world of Intellectual Property
    • Understand the basic nature of the legal system including the court structure and the role oflawyers
    • Understand the difference between intellectual property prosecution and litigation (will bevisited for each major type of IP)
    • Understand the basics of trademark law
    • Understand the basic of patent law
    • Understand the basics of copyright law
    • Understand the basics of trade secret law
    • Understand the basics of IP licensing
    • Understand the basics of IP in relation to an employee/employer context
    • Appreciation for intellectual property considerations in a business setting
    • Basic understanding of how to navigate intellectual property in a business setting
    • Understand the basics of how to research existing patents, trademarks, and copyrights

    Coordinator
    John Osmanski, J.D.
  
  • BA 4344 - Business and Government Relations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course emphasizes economic and legal analysis of governmental policies toward business. A review of microeconomic theory is presented in the first section of the material, and such theory is then applied to analyze statutes in the following areas: consumer protection, environment, equal employment and the workplace. The rationale and procedures utilized in traditional economic regulation and deregulation are covered in detail. The course concludes with suggestions for reforming government regulation of business. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the principal laws that regulate business activity in the marketplace
    • Understand and be able to apply economic analysis to determine the desirable and undesirable features of such regulation
    • Understand the nature of corporate responses to the existence of government regulation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Role of business and government
    • Basic economic concepts
    • Nature and rationale of regulation
    • Theory of public choice
    • Consumer legislation
    • Product liability law
    • Environmental law
    • Risk and cost/benefit analyses
    • Economic analysis of pollution
    • Discrimination law
    • Workplace issues
    • Labor unions and labor laws
    • OSHA and job safety
    • Public utility regulation
    • Anti-trust law
    • Deregulation
    • Reforming government regulation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Paul Hudec
  
  • BA 4348 - Employment Law

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students with a basic understanding of laws that affect or influence the personnel function within the firm. An overview of the following topics or laws is included: discrimination laws, fair labor standards act, equal pay act, regulation of employee benefit plans, employment-at-will doctrine, and unemployment and workers’ compensation laws. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic provisions of the various federal discrimination statutes and the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act
    • Be familiar with the reasoning in the landmark discrimination court cases
    • Understand the basic features of a variety of other laws including employment compensation, workers’ compensation and the Fair Labor Standards Act
    • Be familiar with the provisions in employment contracts and the theories of wrongful discharge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Overview of discrimination laws
    • Civil Rights Act (1991)
    • Employee selection
    • Race discrimination
    • Gender discrimination
    • Sexual harassment and affinity orientation
    • Affirmative action
    • Performance appraisals
    • Age discrimination
    • National origin discrimination
    • Religion discrimination
    • Disability discrimination
    • Family Leave Law
    • Proof/evidence issues
    • Unemployment compensation
    • Fair Labor Standards Act
    • Worker’s compensation
    • Employee benefits
    • Employment contracts
    • Privacy rights
    • Disciplinary action
    • Disciplinary policies
    • Reference checks

    Coordinator
    John Osmanski, J.D.
  
  • BA 4350 - Business Startups for Entrepreneurs

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on topics important and interesting to anyone involved with starting and running a business.  The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the basics of business from choice structure, incorporation, operating agreements, funding a business, manufacturing/operating considerations, how fulfillment and distribution works, and practical considerations including application will be emphasized.  A seminar approach will be followed with student participation expected. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the steps required to effectively start a small business
    • Understand the legal requirements of running a small business
    • Understand the mechanics of effectively operating a small business

    Course Topics
    • Operating agreements/bylaws
    • Business insurance, bank accounts, state/federal permits, FEIN, accepting payments, and other considerations
    • How is the business doing? Accounting, capital budget, profit and loss, balance sheet, cash flow
    • Employment-payroll, workers compensation, unemployment, OSHA, and the EEOC
    • Sales/distribution methods
    • Funding methods

    Coordinator
    John Osmanski, J.D.
  
  • BA 4410 - Negotiations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to become more effective in negotiating, a skill that permeates virtually every aspect of business and area of life.  It is the art and science of analysis and development of skills to implement solutions.  Deciding when it is appropriate to negotiate, setting goals, and recognizing the characteristics of a good deal will be explored.  Strategies and tactics on setting the right tone and analyzing the interests and expectations of the parties are discussed.  These issues are critical to creating and claiming value on a sustainable basis. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Examine and improve communication skills, with a focus on non-verbal messages and listening
    • Evaluate their personal emotional tendencies in the face of conflict and learn to manage their bargaining strengths and weaknesses
    • Effectively utilize and apply conflict intervention strategies such as coaching, negotiation, mediation, and system design in the management and resolution of conflict
    • Appraise one’s personal and professional growth for being a fair, honest, and reasonable negotiator

    Coordinator
    John Osmanski, J.D.
  
  • BA 4449 - Human Resource Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course looks at the activities that comprise the management of human resources (HR) in a business organization. The scope and intent of human resource practices are identified from a management perspective with emphases on ethics, equal employment opportunity, motivation, leadership, discipline, and the rights and responsibility of employer/employee. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze multiple facets of compensation including legal requirements, financial impact on company, salary and benefits
    • Create HR strategy for a chosen company to support the corporate strategy based on researched legal concerns, industry trends, and HR best practices
    • Identify historic, current, and emerging strategic HR challenges and trends
    • Develop a training and development model that is fiscally justified, legally compliant, and engaging to employees

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 4501 - Management Control Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    A detailed review of the nature of control systems, control environment, and control process to achieve organizational goals and objectives. (prereq: BA 2505 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and describe personnel, action, and results controls
    • Analyze performance measures, standards, and incentive targets
    • Assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the management control systems in place in an organization
    • Describe key elements of an effective management control system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires foundational concepts from BA 2505  

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4502 - Accounting Ethics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines current situations for accountants in business today and applies the principles of ethics using case studies. Emphasis on objectivity, rational decision making, critical thinking, and informed, compelling solutions is stressed throughout the course. The four areas of application are: (1) human resource issues, (2) external reporting concerns, (3) internal reporting concerns, and (4) international issues. This course will help satisfy a provision of TSBPA Rule 511.58, which requires that a three-semester hour course in ethics must be completed by individuals who apply to take the CPA Examination. The required course should include ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values. This course examines the need for an ethical system today, including an examination of social problems and the role of business in their solution. Special emphasis is placed on the Rules of Professional Conduct of the accounting profession. (prereq: BA 3595 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Become aware of the role of business in solving global and domestic societal and business issues. This will be undertaken by study of the how business decisions are made, and by examination of related ethical issues
    • Apply critical thinking to new situations
    • Obtain familiarity with the major concepts elaborated in the current Rules of Professional Conduct of the accounting profession
    • Improve research skills and written and oral communications skills through the preparation and presentation of reports
    • Name, describe, and apply ethical theories in determining moral frameworks that exist in business today

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Ethical reasoning: implications for accounting
    • Cognitive processes and ethical decision making in accounting
    • Organizational ethics and corporate governance
    • Ethics and professional judgment in accounting
    • Fraud in financial statements and auditor responsibilities
    • Legal, regulatory, and professional obligations of auditors
    • Earnings management
    • Ethical leadership and decision making in accounting
    • Professional ethics; project

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4510 - Business Tax Planning

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The focus of this course is basic tax issues for taxpayers including individuals and businesses.  The topics include basic income tax computation, income definition, property transactions, taxes and investment and financing decisions, etc.  The purpose is to provide a basic understanding of the role of taxes in decision making. (prereq: BA 2505 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and critically evaluate issues as they relate to taxation
    • Identify the key elements of the US tax code for individuals and businesses
    • Prepare individual and proprietor income tax returns
    • Describe the statutory and regulatory aspects of taxation as they relate to business and individual tax decisions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Requires foundational concepts from BA 2505  

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4512 - Business Tax Planning II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth look into advanced tax laws of the United States. Through research and case analysis, emphasis is on the taxation of business operations and transactions involving corporations and their owners throughout the life of the entity and on the taxation of trusts and estates. (prereq: BA 4510 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and critically research and evaluate issues as they relate to the taxation of businesses, trusts, and estates
    • Identify the key elements of the US tax code for businesses and their owners
    • Prepare business entity income tax returns
    • Describe the statutory and regulatory aspects of taxation as they relate to companies
    • Apply ethical standards to the issues in corporate taxation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Business tax planning

    Course Topics
    • Tax research
    • Corporate formations and capital structures
    • The corporate income tax
    • Corporate nonliquidating and liquidating distributions
    • Corporate acquisitions and reorganizations
    • Consolidated tax returns
    • Personal holding company tax and accumulated earnings tax
    • Estate tax
    • Income taxation of trusts
    • Taxation administrative procedures

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4520 - Investment and Portfolio Analysis

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The focus of this course is the development, management, and monitoring of an investment portfolio. Topics include a historic overview of investment returns, security analysis techniques, investment asset allocation, market efficiency, and modern portfolio theory, and then concluding with an explanation of optimal investment strategies given an individual’s age and financial situation.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe historic returns from different types of investment and how generally greater returns are only achieved with higher levels of risk.
    • Identify the methods for selecting investments and the historic success of these methods.
    • Describe modern portfolio theory including market efficiency, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, and diversification.
    • Describe the management and selection of portfolio assets given stage in life.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4530 - Personal Finance & Planning

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course investigates methods of obtaining, preserving and increasing personal assets. It covers financial planning, personal financial statements, budgeting, taxes, money management, various types of personal debt, housing decisions, various types of personal insurance, and introduction to stock, bond and real estate investing, and retirement and estate planning. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the importance of personal financial planning, and how to use personal financial statements in budgeting and cash flow management
    • Understand the various types of consumer credit available and how to qualify and utilize those types of credit for major purchases such as automobiles and homes
    • Understand the differences between property insurance, liability insurance, health insurance, and life insurance, and how to use those various types of insurance to protect against catastrophic financial losses
    • Have an exposure to stock, bond, and real estate investment and how these investments fit into retirement and estate planning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The importance of personal finance
    • Financial planning
    • Budgeting and cash flow management
    • Managing your income taxes
    • Management of monetary assets
    • Credit use and credit cards
    • Installment credit
    • Automobiles and other major purchases
    • The housing expenditure
    • Risk management and property/liability insurance
    • Health care planning
    • Life insurance planning
    • Investment fundamentals and portfolio management
    • Investing in stocks, bonds
    • Through mutual funds
    • Buying and selling strategies
    • Real estate and advanced portfolio management
    • Retirement and estate planning

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4550 - Auditing

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the theory, practice, and procedures of auditing for public accountants and internal auditors; auditing standards and ethics; development of audit programs; and preparation of working papers and audit reports. (prereq: BA 3595 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and appreciate the philosophy of the auditing process
    • Effectively make decisions regarding auditing, finance reporting, and ethics in an organization
    • Understand the standards, concepts, and principles related to auditing theory and practice
    • Develop concepts of risk and control, evidence, and documentation
    • Improve research skills and written and oral communications skills through case analysis, presentations and discussions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • The demand for audit and other assurance services
    • The CPA profession
    • Audit reports
    • Legal liability
    • Audit responsibilities and objectives
    • Audit evidence
    • Audit planning and analytical procedures
    • Materiality and risk
    • Internal control and control risk
    • Overall audit strategy and audit program
    • Completing the audit

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4570 - Accounting Information Systems

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the analysis, design, and applications of accounting information systems with consideration of related internal control issues and management use of information. (prereq: BA 4820 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the primary information flows within a business organization
    • Gain familiarity with the documentation techniques used for representing manual and computer-based accounting information systems
    • Understand the related concepts of transactions cycles
    • Gain familiarity with the various types of electronic systems used for transaction processing
    • Identify the functional departments involved in the revenue, expenditure and conversion cycles
    • Understand the risks associated with the various transaction cycles and recognize the controls that reduce risks

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Enterprise resource planning

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to accounting information systems
    • Systems documentation
    • Business and ecommerce
    • Auditing IT and business processes management
    • Computerized internal control systems and process management and financial reporting
    • Risk management compliance and controls
    • Warehouse management
    • Electronic reporting systems
    • Bid data and data mining
    • Emerging technologies

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4575 - Accounting Analytics and Artificial Intelligence

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Accounting Analytics and Artificial Intelligence explores how financial statement data and non-financial metrics can be linked to financial performance. Students will learn how data is used to assess what drives financial performance and to forecast future financial scenarios. How artificial intelligence is changing accounting will be explored. Topic coverage includes systems analysis, relational database theory, decision support systems, and artificial intelligence. (prereq: BA 4570 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how financial data and non-financial data interact to forecast events, optimize operations, and determine strategy
    • Make better business decisions about the emerging roles of accounting analytics
    • Apply methods learned to create strategy using financial data
    • Use tools common for artificial intelligence, focusing on techniques used in accounting and finance
    • Understand the application of machine learning and deep neural networks to discovery of new knowledge and information

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • How data analytics is important to accountants
    • Sources of accounting data and data storage
    • Financial reporting and analysis: slicing and dicing, queries, and reports
    • Data visualizations and data warehouse, data mining, and fraud
    • Auditing analytics
    • Modes for accounting decision making
    • Computational intelligence, interpretation, and evaluation of results
    • AI and accounting

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4580 - Advanced Managerial Accounting

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds off the fundamental concepts and methods used in managerial accounting and costing. The focus will be on operating segment reporting and decision making; complex capital budgeting; and advanced managerial accounting topics such as quality management, managerial accounting analytics and lean accounting. (prereq: BA 3580 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze complex costing data and make informed decisions using that data
    • Understand and analyze the managerial accounting decisions in a decentralized organization
    • Apply the theoretical concepts of behavioral management as it applies to financial performance measurement, evaluation, and incentives
    • Understand the strategic cost analysis process, including determining relevant data
    • Demonstrate and analyze how innovative managerial accounting techniques are used to better manage businesses

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Managerial accounting
    • Costing

    Course Topics
    • Review of managerial accounting and costing
    • Strategy, balanced scorecard, and strategic profitability analysis
    • Pricing decision and cost management
    • Cost allocation, customer-profitability analysis, and sales variance analysis
    • Allocation of support department costs, common cost, and revenues
    • Cost allocation: joint products and byproducts
    • Spoilage, rework, and scrap
    • Balanced scorecard: quality and time
    • Inventory management, just-in-time and simplified costing methods
    • Management control systems, transfer pricing, and multinational considerations

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4590 - Advanced Accounting and Research

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents an in-depth analysis of advanced accounting topics. Students are introduced to the consolidation of financial statements, translation of foreign currencies, the reporting requirements of business segments, international standards, estates and trusts, partnerships, and corporations in financial difficulty. Through research and case analysis, emphasis is on both the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Conceptual Framework and the practical utilization of GAAP. (prereq: BA 3595 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Construct and analyze consolidated financial statements and segment reporting
    • Translate and account for international accounting entries
    • Summarize SEC and SOX requirements
    • Prepare the entries necessary for partnership, estate, and trust transactions
    • Apply ethical standards to issues in accounting

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • Partnerships
    • Equity method of accounting for investments
    • Consolidations
    • Consolidated financial statement and outside ownership
    • Consolidated financial statement and intra-entity asset transactions
    • Variable interest entities, intra-entity debt and consolidate cash flows
    • Segment and interim reporting
    • Foreign currency transactions, derivations, and hedging foreign exchange risk
    • Estates
    • Trusts

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 4601 - International Marketing and Export Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the economic, political, and culture differences among nations as they influence marketing.  Students will explore global marketing opportunities for organizations, laws, and practices; develop abilities to identify and evaluate opportunities abroad; gain skills in gathering information and drawing conclusions; and be expected to develop an export marketing plan (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the role of country or regional culture on marketing programs and campaigns, and incorporate the learning in an export marketing plan
    • Understand how regional and local laws and standards affect marketing programs including channel policy and include that understanding in marketing plans
    • Understand how political and economic factors must be considered in export programs including logistics, tariffs, taxes, and duties
    • Develop and present a marketing plan including integrated marketing campaigns considering the cultural, political, and legal factors of a specific region
    • Develop and present an export management plan specific to a region

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Gene Wright
  
  • BA 4620 - Technical Selling

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will serve as a foundation for understanding all major aspects of personal selling. The work of the individual sales representative or sales engineer will be reviewed with emphasis on sales to and for industrial and business enterprises. Characteristics of the successful salesperson, making a good sales presentation, prospecting for leads, and time and territory management will be discussed. Role-playing of both the salesperson and the purchasing agent, buyer, is an integral part of the learning process. Practice and feedback will be given to enhance skills in oral presentation, written expression, and class participation. (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Effectively formulate, express, and understand ideas of the principles of selling and how it relates to the business world
    • Understand the elements needed of a salesperson from service to ethics
    • Broaden one’s understanding of the key elements in the American free enterprise system by doing a sales presentation and role play as a purchasing agent

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Selling as a profession
    • Preparing for relationship selling
    • Relationship selling process
    • Ethics in sales
    • Current events relating to sales/selling
    • Sales presentation
    • Role play as purchasing agent

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4622 - Psychology of Sales

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the persuasion, communication, psychology, sociology, and power dynamics in a business selling environment. It also covers how to start and close the sales process with a prospect through understanding personal, departmental, and corporate needs. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use effective communication to persuade a prospect to advance in the sales process
    • Understand why and how people are persuaded to buy products or services
    • Apply those persuasion theories to move a prospect through the sales process in a simulated environment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4624 - Sales Process and Pipeline

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This class covers the mechanics and timing of the sales process. It emphasizes relationships and how to have continuous success, minimizing peaks and valleys in the sales cycle. Various tools and techniques will be covered for a variety of sales situations across technical fields. (prereq: BA 4620 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand customer relation management software/systems (CRM) and their functions
    • Create and manage a sales process ethically for various sales scenarios (inside, outside, relationship, transactional, etc.)
    • Recognize problem areas in sales cycles and pipelines and develop solutions
    • Identify and manage numerous sources for sales pipeline
    • Communicate with stakeholders about the sales process and pipeline

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4626 - Networking and Prospecting

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the portion of sales about lead generation and relationship development in a sales/business environment.  Understanding key differences between prospecting and networking, and the appropriate techniques to manage and develop those relationships will be covered.   (prereq: BA 4620 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify ways to build a professional network and its purpose
    • Create several streams for prospecting
    • Qualify a prospect from a contact
    • Apply tips and techniques for keeping an active network and pipeline
    • Deeply understand business acumen to find qualified prospects in an organization

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4628 - Forecasting

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Sales and marketing departments often have the best understanding of business needs and trends and are often involved in forecasting throughout organizations. This class covers how to examine the industry landscape, how to identify a company’s relative position in the industry, and where the opportunities exist for short and midterm timeframes. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Complete and comprehend internal and external environmental landscape analyses for a company, its stakeholders, and its industry
    • Learn various qualitative and quantitative forecasting tools for organizations
    • Create financial estimates based on forecast
    • Synthesize complex data to accurately forecast for a business

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4650 - Branding and Brand Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will provide an overview of branding and brand management with an emphasis on how to foster growth within companies. Specifically, brands will be considered assets that need to be developed and nurtured to fulfill the organization’s financial goals. While the value of brands has been informally acknowledged for many years, brand management frameworks are relatively new. Students will use various frameworks and tools to examine how to assess a brand’s value and how to leverage this value in various brand decisions (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a framework for structuring brand management decisions.
    • Use different approaches to assessing brand equity.
    • Know how to leverage brand assets through extensions, co-branding and other methods, and assess the impact of these actions.
    • Understand the concept of brand architecture and be able to explain the conditions under which one type of architecture is more appropriate than another.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4667 - Marketing Research

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of market research. It covers the major applications areas for market research, the design and application of basic research tools, the role of marketing research, and the measurement and evaluation tools used in market research. (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the importance of marketing research in shaping marketing decisions
    • Distinguish between primary and secondary research techniques and apply them to marketing situations
    • Explain the measurement concepts and scales used in marketing research
    • Define the elements in questionnaire design and apply them in developing survey instruments
    • Distinguish between probability and nonprobability sampling concepts and determine sample size
    • Apply data analysis and statistical testing techniques
    • Design and conduct secondary and primary research studies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic knowledge of marketing principles

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4668 - Promotion and Advertising Strategies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the promotional alternatives available to firms’ advertising, personal sales, sales promotions and public relations. Promotional strategies are analyzed in view of the company’s marketing objectives, market conditions and the competitive environment. A basic objective of the course is to study the variables that will determine the optimal promotional “mix.”  (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize the critical role communication plays in marketing programs
    • Recognize the importance of effective brand and product positioning, and utilize the strategies that help establish a positive position
    • Comprehend the relationship between a company’s promotional efforts, the efforts of competition, and the opportunities and threats that result from these activities
    • Recognize the steps of effective advertising management
    • Recognize how visual and verbal messages are used in ads
    • Create and implement a media strategy
    • Recognize the important relationships between advertising programs and other parts of the promotional mix
    • Adapt marketing communications functions to Internet programs
    • Recognize the various levels at which IMC programs should be assessed
    • Demonstrate an understanding of IMC principles and practices through developing a comprehensive IMC program

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of marketing principles

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4669 - Consumer Behavior

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a detailed understanding of how marketers create value for customers, what motivates shoppers to buy, how consumers process information and make decisions, persuasion techniques, cross-cultural influences on consumer behavior, and the impact of sustainable business practices on consumer choice. (prereq: BA 2661 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand consumer motivations and decision processes and apply to marketing strategies
    • Understand theories of persuasion to improve marketing communication effectiveness
    • Evaluate and apply ethical standards to marketing messages across media
    • Analyze consumer behavior to identify ways to improve marketing communication

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understanding of advertising, promotion, and/or branding required

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4710 - Introduction to Unix Operating Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This first course in Unix is designed to acquaint the student with the usage, philosophy and design behind a robust, open system. The student is exposed to the standard utilities, shell scripting languages and some of the tools that are commonly available to Unix users. The goal of this course is to familiarize student with the Unix basics for further study, and to acquaint the student with the ideals of an open system utilizing multitasking, networking and high-level computing language manipulation. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • TBD

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4712 - Advanced Unix and System Administration

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The second course in Unix is a continuation of the first course, with more emphasis on some of the topics covered briefly in the earlier course. In-depth coverage of system control and administration, process manipulation, specialized utilities, and PERL scripting is presented. (prereq: BA 4710 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate the ability to maintain and enhance a Unix/Linux system as a stand-alone system, a network client and a network server
    • Understand how to manage toe book process through the seven run levels of a Unix/Linux system
    • Understand the Unix/Linux process model and how to create, destroy, suspend, resume and restart processes (especially daemon processes)
    • Understand the full capabilities and limitations of the superuser (root)
    • Understand how to create, remove and maintain user accounts
    • Understand the Unix/Linux file system and how it’s used to interface to virtually any kind of hardware device or resource
    • Understand how to write shell scripts to automate repetitive system administration tasks (sh, bash or perl)
    • Understand backup procedures that are necessary for most Unix/Linux data centers
    • Understand how logging facilities work under Unix/Linux
    • Understand how security and protection mechanism work under Unix/Linux
    • Know how to upgrade the kernel
    • Know how to upgrade application packages that run under Unix/Linux

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Getting help on Unix/Linux (documentation user’s groups)
    • Booting, startup and shutdown issues
    • Superuser and root permissions
    • Process control and management
    • File system permissions and management
    • Network management
    • Security and protection mechanisms
    • System architecture
    • Network architecture

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4730 - Microsoft Windows Configuration

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install, deploy, and configure Microsoft Windows. Topics include installing Microsoft Windows configuring applications, network connectivity, access to resources, mobile computing, monitoring performance, and troubleshooting. The course includes face-to-face class sessions, in-class and virtual labs. The course covers material in Microsoft’s official curriculum course #6292A (Installing and Configuring Windows Client), and the associated certification exam #70-680 required for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification.  (prereq: one course in computer programming or computer networking or equivalent professional experience)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify hardware requirements and install Windows
    • Configure shared resources and file/folder access
    • Manage disks
    • Configure devices and applications
    • Configure shared resources and file/folder access
    • Manage permissions and resource sharing
    • Manage users and groups including User Account Control
    • Manage drivers and printers in Windows
    • Configure and support network connectivity
    • Configure Windows 7 security
    • Manage mobile computing using Windows
    • Monitor and troubleshoot resources and performance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, installation, and deployment of Windows (2 classes)
    • Configuring system settings (1 class)
    • Managing Disks (2 classes)
    • Installing and configuring network components and services (1 class)
    • Planning, setting up, and managing user and group accounts (1 class)
    • Configuring printing in Windows (1 class)
    • Configuring security in Windows (1 class)
    • Configuring Windows 7 applications (1 class)
    • Securing resources using NTFS and shared folder permissions (2 classes)
    • Configuring data protection and backups (1 class)
    • Configuring User Account Control (1 class)
    • Configuring Remote access technologies (1 class)
    • Implementing, managing, troubleshooting hardware devices and drivers (1 class)
    • Optimizing Windows performance (1 class)
    • Troubleshooting Windows (2 classes)
    • Working with mobile computing (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 4735 - Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Configuration

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This comprehensive course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary for installing and configuring Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2. Topics include managing a Windows Server 2012 system with a focus on installation and configuration and coverage of server management, configuration of storage, file and printer services, Active Directory, account management, Group Policy, TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP and Hyper-V virtualization. The course includes face-to-face class sessions, in-class and virtual labs and maps to the Microsoft MCSE/MCSA certification exam 70-410 while preparing them to successfully meet the real-world challenges of a Microsoft networking professional. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Plan server installations and upgrades
    • Plan and configure Active Directory
    • Plan application servers and services
    • Manage file and print server roles
    • Configure and manage group policy strategy
    • Configure and manage User and Group accounts
    • Configure and manage network services (TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP)
    • Configure security policies
    • Configure Hyper-V virtualization

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Course in computer networking or professional networking experience

    Course Topics
    • Introducing Windows Server 2012/R2
    • Installing Windows Server 2012/R2
    • Local and remote server management
    • Configuring server storage
    • File and printer services
    • Introducing Active Directory
    • Managing OUs and Active Directory accounts
    • Configuring group policies
    • Configuring TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP
    • Configuring virtualization with Hyper-V

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 4740 - CompTIA Network+

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Developed by CompTIA, earning the Network+ Certification means that the candidate possesses the knowledge needed to configure and install the TCP/IP client. The Network+ exam covers a wide range of vendor and product neutral networking technologies that can also serve as a prerequisite for vendor-specific IT certifications. Novell accepts the Network+ certification exam in place of its Networking Technologies exam for all Certified Novell Engineer (CNE) candidates. Topics covered include in-depth coverage of the OSI Model and the corresponding protocols, transmission media, protocols, bridging, switching hubs, routers, the 802.x standards and WAN technologies. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize the logical and physical topologies given a diagram or description
    • Identify the main features and characteristics of networking technologies and media (cables, etc.)
    • Identify the purpose, features, and functions of networking components such as hubs, bridges, and network adapter cards (NICs)
    • Identify and differentiate between various network protocols and services, including remote access and security protocols and services
    • Recognize the OSI layers and at which layer the various network components operate
    • Identify IP addresses
    • Identify the basic characteristics of Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies recognize and differentiate the basic networking capabilities of various server operating systems including Microsoft, Novell, Unix/Linux, and Macintosh
    • Identify and implement various disaster recovery and security measures such as firewalls and proxy servers
    • Recognize and be able to utilize network troubleshooting tools including TCP/IP utilities, diagnostic utilities, and hardware tools

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and networking basics including an overview of the OSI Model Layers (1 class)
    • Network hardware and connections (2 classes)
    • Network software (1 class)
    • Networking protocols including TCP/IP fundamentals, applications, and configuration including IP addressing (3 classes)
    • Remote network access and routing (2 classes)
    • Planning, installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting a network both LANs and WANs (2 classes)
    • Network security (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 4742 - CompTIA Security+

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The CompTIA Security+ vendor-neutral certification exam is the worldwide standard of competency for the foundation-level security practitioner. Companies that have contributed to the development of the Security+ Certification include IBM, Microsoft, Verisign, the FBI and the US Secret Service. This lab-based course covers general security topics such as access control and virus attacks, basics of cryptography, communication security for remote access, email, wireless networks, operational and organizational security, and infrastructure security. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand general security concepts including access control, authentication methods, social engineering attacks, and malicious code
    • Understand communication security concepts including remote access, email, web, and wireless vulnerabilities
    • Gain an understanding of infrastructure security devices, media, topologies, intrusion detection, and operating system, network, and application hardening
    • Understand the basics of cryptography
    • Understand operational/organizational security concepts including physical security, disaster recovery, business continuity, and risk identification
    • Educate end users and document security policies and procedures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and identification of security threats
    • Hardening internal systems and services, and internetwork devices and services
    • Securing network communications for network and wireless traffic, client internet access, and remote access channels
    • Managing a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), and certificates
    • Enforcing organizational security policies and educating end users
    • Monitoring the security infrastructure

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4750 - Computer and Info Systems Forensics

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The rapid advance of technology and social media has created significant demand for highly educated specialists in the discipline of computer and information systems forensics. The next generation of “digital detectives” will have to possess the knowledge, skills, and experience to conduct complex, data-intensive forensics examinations involving various operating systems, platforms, and file types. This hands-on, lab-based course guides students through conducting a high-tech investigation, from acquiring digital evidence to reporting findings with special emphasis on ethics. Topics covered include how to set up a forensics lab, how to acquire the proper and necessary tools, and how to conduct the investigation and subsequent digital analysis. The lab-based course includes face-to-face class sessions, in-class and virtual labs. This course maps to and helps prepare for a number of certifications including the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS), Computer|Hacking Forensic Investigator (C|HFI), and the globally recognized CISSP Certified Information Systems Security Professional certifications. (prereq: BA 3720 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand computer investigations
    • Data acquisition
    • Process crime and incident scenes
    • Work with computer forensics tools
    • Work with various operating and file systems
    • Investigate email, cell phones, and mobile devices
    • Report writing and testimony for high-tech investigation
    • Witness ethics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Networking, operating system, and computer security experience

    Course Topics
    • The profession of computer forensics and investigation
    • Computer investigations
    • Data acquisition
    • Processing crime and incident scenes
    • Working with Windows and DOS systems
    • Computer forensics tools
    • Computer Forensics analysis and validation
    • Recovering graphic files
    • Virtual machines, network forensics, and live acquisitions
    • E-mail investigations
    • Cell phone and mobile device forensics
    • Report writing and expert testimony in high-tech investigations
    • Ethics for the expert witness

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4760 - e-Business Technologies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Today’s businesses are global in nature. An Internet presence is essential to the marketing and sales efforts of any organization. Network technologies allow virtual storefronts to compete with brick-and-mortar (traditional) sales vendors. This course examines what it takes to produce a “web presence” using a number of tools and technologies (LAMP: Linux, Apache, MySQL and Perl/Python/PHP). It emphasizes that the business model, expressed as use-case requirements, has to be satisfactorily completed prior to embarking on a development project. An overview of e-business technologies will be covered, along with the building of an e-business site. (prereq: BA 2710 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 4762 - Cross-Platform Mobile Application Development

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Cross-platform mobile applications are programs that are written once and can be run on several types of mobile devices, without any code changes. In this course we will use a JavaScript library called Titanium to develop, test, simulate and deploy mobile apps on iPhone, iPad, iPod and Android devices. Students do not need a mobile device but may wish to use their own devices in the course. Included in this course are lessons on how to write good, object-oriented JavaScript programs. (prereq: BA 4760 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate the ability to design, develop and implement mobile applications that run on today’s most popular mobile platforms, such as Apple’s iOS, Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows Phone operating systems
    • Master the use of development tools necessary to create, test and deploy mobile applications on multiple mobile platforms, such as Axway Appcelerator Studio, the Android System Development Kit (SDK) and Apple Xcode
    • Demonstrate proficiency in using standard programming languages for mobile application development such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and RESTful Web Services

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • JavaScript, O-OP and SQL

    Course Topics
    • Overview of course and brief summary of computer software used in the course
    • User interface fundamentals & deep dives
    • Local data sources on mobile devices
    • Remote data sources on mobile devices
    • Media and related Application Programming Interfaces (APIs)
    • Location services
    • Notification services
    • Integrating mobile and web content
    • Debugging and profiling tools and techniques
    • Distributing your mobile application via app stores

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4765 - C# Programming

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Microsoft’s strategy for new products is to tightly integrate data, resources, web services, documentation and content into a framework, commonly referred to as the .NET framework. The term .NET refers to network-enabled services that span platforms and systems. This course will present an introduction to the C# programming language in a Windows environment using the .NET framework. The CLR (common Language Runtime) and the FCL (Framework Class Library) will be explored along with event handling and typical Windows controls. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Be introduced to the C# programming language in a Windows environment using the .NET framework
    • Explore the CLR (Common Language Runtime) and the FCL (Framework Class Library) along with event handling and typical Windows controls

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4770 - C++ Programming for Business

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The object-oriented programmer is introduced to the syntax and semantics of the C++ programming language. Students write several programs exploring basic techniques covering the concepts of C++ expressions, data types, functions, parameter passing, control structures, data structures and operator overloading. The basic object model in C++ is covered and the canonical form of class authorship is stressed (constructors, destructors, copy constructors and overloading the assignment operator). (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic expressions that make up the C++ language (constant, variable, arithmetic, relational, logical, etc.)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of control statements and the proper structuring of control statements to solve problems
    • Demonstrate knowledge of I/O streams for reading and writing data to and from files, consoles and other devices
    • Demonstrate knowledge of functions and parameter passing (value parameters, reference parameters, return by reference, tec.)
    • Design a program in a modular fashion using functions
    • Understand the scoping rules for identifiers and the use of global namespaces
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic data structures: arrays and vectors (both one-and two-dimensional)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of strings and basic string manipulation operations
    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of classes, data members, and member functions (object-oriented programming basics); use of “const’ as a mechanism for protection of data
    • Demonstrate basic operator overloading: overloading with a method (+) and overloading with a global friend 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Knowledge, understanding, and familiarity with computing languages
    • Knowledge of an object-oriented programming language

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to object-oriented software development (1 class)
    • Introduction to C++ syntax and basic operations (4 classes)
    • Functions: identifier scope and lifetime, parameters (4 classes)
    • Object-oriented design, class libraries and member functions (3 classes)
    • Selection and iteration (4 classes)
    • Containers: vector, list, and array (3 classes)
    • Character string classes and operations (2 classes)
    • Programming style, development process, design exercises and special topics (5 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Computing environment (1 session)
    • Conditionals (1 session)
    • Loops (1 session)
    • File I/O (1 session)
    • Sorting (1 session)
    • Matrices (2 sessions)
    • Rational Number Class Abstraction (2 sessions)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4772 - Adv C++ Programming for Business

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues looking into computer systems and software by studying one of the popular high-level languages, C++. The course provides in-depth study into the structured concepts of program and algorithm design. Specifically, the inheritance and polymorphism features of the language are covered, with particular focus placed on algorithm development using the Standard Template Library (STL). Lab exercises using Microsoft’s Visual C++ and Unix/Linux K-Develop and Gnu g++ compiler to reinforce the topics presented in the lecture, while demonstrating the multi-platform nature of this widely adopted systems programming language. (prereq: BA 4770 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Study the structured concepts of program and algorithm design
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the inheritance and polymorphism features of the language with particular focus placed on algorithm development using the Standard Template Library (STL)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Review of the Microsoft Visual Studio Environment
    • Review the C++ programming language
    • New topics in the C++ language

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4820 - Enterprise Resource Planning

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. The foundations of these systems will be explored, such as implementing ERP, selection of software, integration of processes and transactions, and challenges associated with successful implementation of ERP applications. The course will include exposure to ERP software.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the function an ERP plays in all businesses
    • Explain the differences between a business process and a business function
    • Describe the process for software selection and installation
    • Demonstrate an ability to enter data, perform business processes, and troubleshoot data issues in the chosen ERP system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Thomas Eberle
  
  • BA 4850 - Telecommunications

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    An overview is provided for both voice and data communications. This course examines the industry, develops technical understanding of the operation of various devices, and provides background on the legislative, judicial and regulatory aspects of the Telecommunications industry. A special emphasis is placed on Local Area Networks (LANs) and Wide Area Networks (WANs). (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic workings of the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
    • Demonstrate an understanding of key legislation that has been passed by Congress that has affected the telecommunications industry
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the judicial decisions that have been decided by the courts and their effect on the telecommunications industry
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of regulatory bodies (FCC, PSC) and their impact on the telecommunications industry
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the principles of electromagnetics and electromechanical devices, in as much as they relate to telecommunications
    • Demonstrate an understanding of multiplexing and line grooming in the process of providing a telecommunications transport infrastructure
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of digital communications and communication devices used in the PSTN
    • Demonstrate an understanding of multilayered network communication models and the use of TCP, IP, and Ethernet protocols in LANs and WANs
    • Demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research and write a term paper that details one aspect of telecommunications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • A fundamental understanding of computing systems and programming

    Course Topics
    • Telegraph and telephone networks (2 classes)
    • The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) (6 classes)
    • The legislative, judicial, and regulatory history of the telecommunications industry (3 classes)
    • Introduction to electricity and magnetism (1 class)
    • Multiplexing, line compression, and grooming (2 classes)
    • Digital communications and devices (3 classes)
    • ISDN, ADSL, and CATV standards (3 classes)
    • LAN and WAN protocols (Ethernet, TCP/IP, X.25, FR, ATM, QoS) (5 classes)
    • Guest lectures (PSc commissioner; Computer Center tour) (2 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Blessing
  
  • BA 4951 - German Practicum

    9 lecture hours 0 lab hours 9 credits
    Course Description
    This course is required at the end of the formal studies in the exchange program with Technische Hochschule Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. The practicum and its oral defense are the culmination of the degree work, when students must complete an extensive project/internship that entails a mixture of theory and application. The intent is for students to create an interesting and challenging project that can provide high value for an organization, where the outcome is a thesis and implementation of recommendations. Projects are typically at firms with international operations. (prereq: none) (coreq: BA 4953  and consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the major and minor elements of an applied project created by a business organization
    • Provide a critical analysis of the defined problem based on research and the limitations imposed by the sponsoring organization
    • Make an assessment of possible solutions with appropriate models under the guidance of a faculty advisor and company supervisor
    • Construct a thesis with appropriate documentation of each step in the analysis and justification for selected solution(s)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Review of thesis writing guidelines
    • Thesis review and revision in consultation with thesis advisor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 4953 - German Colloquium

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is required at the end of the formal studies in the exchange program with Technische Hochschule Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. It is the complement of the German Practicum experience. Students are required to have an oral defense of their thesis, and at the discretion of the review committee, a defense of their academic studies. (prereq: none) (coreq: BA 4951  and consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Formulate a presentation and defense of the BA 4951  thesis work for the sponsoring organization and the academic review committee from Technisch Hochschule Lübeck and the Rader School of Business
    • Demonstrate superior knowledge and independent thought in answering questions related to the thesis or any previous studies examined by the academic review committee

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 4960 - Selected Topics in Business

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    Students in this course will explore contemporary business issues and topics. Subject matter will vary based upon expertise of faculty member teaching the course. Instructors from the Technische Hochschule Lübeck and MSOE may lead the course individually or collaboratively based on subjects selected. (prereq: senior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 4970 - Practicum in Entrepreneurship

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a structure from which a student engages in an entrepreneurial experience or project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the student is expected to develop a business plan and engage in plan execution. The business plan must feature innovation, new/improved product, new/improved service, or new/improved business process. Market viability, economic analysis, and financial impacts are expected to be demonstrated in course deliverables. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ruth Barratt
  
  • BA 4975 - Applied Servant Leadership - Business Solutions

    0 lecture hours 10 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The project-based course integrates the concepts covered in the BBA curricula. In this course, students work under the direction of a faculty advisor to manage a business project, including the design and implementation of an appropriate solution to an identified problem. The project may include a practicum experience. Students are expected to document and present the results of their project experience. (prereq: consent of department chairperson)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ruth Barratt
  
  • BA 4990 - Business Strategy

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will use their program learning to create and implement a business strategy in a simulation platform.  Students will create and execute a business strategy in a closed industry simulation against peers.  The customer needs, competition practices, multiple organizational departments (Operations, Marketing, Finance, Human Resources, Continuous Improvement, Etc.), and research options will all change as the simulation progresses.  Students will need to use the experience of their previous classes, their learning team, and research to make strategic decisions and meet their stated business strategy outcomes by the end of the quarter. (prereq: senior standing and consent of the BBA program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Forecast the business needs to meet customer demands in a competitive environment
    • Manage the interdependencies and relationships between departments in an organization
    • Create and execute a sustainable business strategy
    • Allocate resources appropriate to chosen business strategy in an ethical manner
    • Assess strategic effectiveness using reports and analytics
    • Communicate the above ideas in a professional manner to the appropriate audience level

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 4991 - Capstone I

    0 lecture hours 10 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this first course of the capstone series, students will propose a summative project that will demonstrate the student’s ability to integrate the knowledge, skills, and experiences acquired in the Business Administration program.  Students will describe the business case for the project, develop a project scope and plan, and identify and obtain the resources necessary for successful project completion.  Students will meet regularly with a faculty advisor to track project progress.  (prereq: senior standing and consent of program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and describe the business case for a project, including alignment with enterprise strategies and/or market
    • Evaluate a project idea and its potential to produce innovation and changes to the status quo
    • Assess the data sources needed for a project related to the overall scope and strategy
    • Perform a resource assessment for a project including budget and personnel

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4992 - Capstone II

    0 lecture hours 10 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this second course of the capstone series, students will complete the summative project proposed within the first course (BA 4991 ).  Based on the project plan, students will complete the activities within the project using appropriate analytical techniques and technical tools.  Students will provide a financial assessment related to the project, as well as evaluate the ethical impact and sustainability of the project outcomes.  At the completion of the course, students will professionally present their projects. (prereq: BA 4991 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate the use of appropriate analytical techniques and technical tools based on project scope and strategy
    • Prepare a financial analysis relevant to the project selected
    • Define and describe the ethical impact and sustainability of the project selected
    • Prepare a professional presentation of project findings in written and oral formats

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Completion of deliverables from BA 4991  

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 4999 - Independent Study

    1-3 lecture hours 0-10 lab hours 1-3 credits
    Course Description
    This selection allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature survey, analysis, design or laboratory study. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determined by instructor for each student

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ruth Barratt

Computer Engineering

  
  • CE 493 - Advanced Digital Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the concept of softcore processor design. Softcore processors are customizable systems on a chip. The students will develop custom peripherals for the softcore processor system using VHDL. Verification of the design of the peripherals will be performed by writing testbenches in VHDL and running simulations. A variety of peripherals will be designed such as a PWM component, a timer/counter component and a UART. The components that the students design will be instantiated as peripherals to the softcore processor and then downloaded to an FPGA. Test programs written in C will then be used to verify that the system functions as specified. (prereq: CE 1921  or EE 3921 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use VHDL to describe a digital system behaviorally and structurally
    • Write a testbench in VHDL to perform simulation and verification of a digital system
    • Create a custom embedded system using a softcore processor
    • Use custom-made components written in VHDL as peripherals to a softcore process
    • Download the entire system to an FPGA and write code in C to test the design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Combinational and sequential digital logic with VHDL
    • Computer organization and architecture

    Course Topics
    • Concurrent signal assignments (2 classes)
    • Structural design (2 classes)
    • Processes and sequential statements (2 classes)
    • Finite state machine implementation (2 classes)
    • Generics and parameterized component design (1 class)
    • Case studies (6 classes)
    • Timing models for simulation (2 classes)
    • Hour examination (1 class)
    • Introduction to softcore processors (4 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Each instructor will assign weekly laboratory projects. All projects will utilize Quartus II for the implementation and simulation of the design. The lab exercises will utilize an Altera Development board (for example, DE1). These boards are available for checkout from the Technical Support Center

    Coordinator
    Dr. Adam Livingston
  
  • CE 498 - Topics in Computer Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in computer engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant
  
  • CE 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    A student enrolled in this course is afforded the opportunity to pursue a specialized topic in his or her chosen field of study. After an approved area of study has been selected, weekly meetings with the course advisor are required. A final report, the format of which is left to the discretion of the advisor, is required at the end of the term. (prereq: junior standing or senior standing, consent of instructor and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Engage in independent learning on a specialized topic
    • Document research or study results in a technical report

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Laboratory Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant
  
  • CE 1901 - Digital Logic 1

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces combinational logic analysis and design. The topics include digital signals, binary numbers, logic gates, logic families, combinational building blocks, Boolean algebra, combinational circuit analysis, and combinational circuit design techniques. Emphasis is placed on the VHDL hardware description language as a vehicle for circuit description and simulation. Laboratory exercises require the student to design, simulate, implement, and test a wide range of digital circuits using standard logic families and programmable logic devices. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Perform binary and hexadecimal arithmetic 
    • Simplify canonical equations using Boolean algebra
    • Analyze combinational logic circuits 
    • Design combinational logic circuits using paper-based techniques including Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps
    • Design combinational logic circuits using the VHDL hardware description language
    • Apply datasheets during analysis and design 
    • Draw timing diagrams for combinational logic circuits 

    Course Topics
    • Binary and hexadecimal numbers
    • Digital signals
    • Logic gates and gate-level circuits
    • Timing diagrams 
    • Boolean algebra
    • Karnaugh maps
    • Logic reduction techniques 
    • Arithmetic circuits
    • Multiplexers
    • Decoders
    • Encoders
    • Comparators
    • Using datasheets in analysis and design
    • VHDL hardware description styles
    • Altera Quartus Design Suite

    Laboratory Topics
    • Design and analysis of combinational logic circuits implemented with standard logic families 
    • Design and analysis of combinational logic circuits implemented with field programmable gate arrays 
    • Design and simulation of combinational logic circuits using computer-aided design tools 
    • Structural and behavioral architectural description of combinational logic circuits using the VHDL hardware description language 
    • Basic test and measurement of combinational logic circuits using devices such as multimeters, logic probes, and digital oscilloscopes

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russ Meier
  
  • CE 1911 - Digital Logic 2

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces sequential logic analysis and design. The topics include flip-flops, registers, counters, shift-registers, algorithmic state machines, basic algebraic data paths, register files, and memories. Emphasis is placed on the VHDL hardware description language as a vehicle for circuit description and simulation. Laboratory exercises require the student to design, simulate, implement, and test a wide range of sequential digital circuits using standard logic families and programmable logic devices. (prereq: CE 1901 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze sequential logic circuits 
    • Design sequential logic circuits using paper-based techniques such as Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps
    • Design sequential logic circuits using the VHDL hardware description language
    • Apply datasheets during analysis and design 
    • Draw timing diagrams for sequential logic circuits 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Binary and hexadecimal number systems 
    • Logic gates 
    • Boolean algebra
    • Arithmetic circuits 
    • Combinational logic building blocks
    • Combinational system analysis
    • Combinational system design 
    • VHDL description and simulation of combinational systems

    Course Topics
    • Basic one-bit memory elements: latches and flip flops
    • Registers 
    • Algorithmic finite state machines
    • Counters 
    • Larger memories: register files, ROM, RAM, address buses, data buses
    • Special-purpose data path design
    • Data path controllers

    Laboratory Topics
    • Design and analysis of sequential logic circuits implemented with standard logic families 
    • Design and analysis of sequential logic circuits implemented with field programmable gate arrays 
    • Design and simulation of sequential logic circuits using computer-aided design tools 
    • Structural and behavioral architectural description of sequential logic circuits using the VHDL hardware description language 
    • Basic test and measurement of sequential logic circuits using oscilloscopes and logic analyzers

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russ Meier
  
  • CE 1921 - Computer Architecture

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the concepts of computer architecture and performance trade-offs that must be made in the design of computer systems. Topics covered include reduced instruction set computers, instruction set design options, processor implementation, pipelining, and memory hierarchy. The lectures are reinforced through laboratory projects that require students to design and simulate the data path and control circuitry of a reduced instruction set microprocessor. (prereq: CE 1911 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the VHDL hardware description language to implement and simulate a digital system
    • Understand the parameters that determine CPU performance (clock cycle time, CPI, instruction count)
    • Explain how the CPU implementation and the instruction set influence the performance parameters
    • Implement a general-purpose register RISC CPU with instructions such as load-word, store-word, beq, addi, jump, etc.
    • Understand the concepts of pipelining such as hazard detection, data forwarding, and branch handling

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Sequential systems: memories, state machine design, VHDL description of memory-based digital logic circuits

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the course (1 class)
    • Basic computer design concepts (1 class)
    • System performance (3 classes)
    • Instruction set design and related issues including operand types, addressing modes, instruction types (2 classes)
    • Instruction set examples (2 classes)
    • Design of computational circuits (2 classes)
    • Carry-look-ahead adders (2 classes)
    • Single cycle CPU implementation (3 classes)
    • Multi-cycle CPU implementation (3 classes)
    • Micro-programming (2 classes)
    • Pipeline implementation (4 classes)
    • Principles of cache design (2 classes)
    • Hour examinations (2 classes)
    • Altera Quartus Design Suite: integrated daily

    Laboratory Topics
    • VHDL design and simulation of an arithmetic logic unit
    • VHDL design and simulation of a single-cycle MIPS microprocessor
    • VHDL design and simulation of a pipelined MIPS microprocessor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russell Meier
  
  • CE 2801 - Embedded Systems I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents a typical embedded microcontroller and assembly language programming as an efficient and direct means of programmatically controlling an embedded system. Topics covered include the addressing modes, register file, and instruction set of a microcontroller; subsystems such as timers and analog to digital conversion; and interrupts. Software control of hardware is stressed. In the laboratory, students design software to demonstrate proficiency in these areas. (prereq: CS 1011 ) (coreq: CE 1901 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize the role of assembly language programming
    • State the programmer’s model of a typical embedded processor
    • Break down the instruction set of a typical embedded processor, recognizing load/store, arithmetic, conditional branch, and unconditional branch instructions
    • Construct assembly language programs by using and reusing subroutines
    • Apply memory addressing and various addressing modes
    • Understand the concept and usage of interrupts
    • Given proper documentation, be able to configure and use common microcontroller subsystems such as timers, UART, ADC

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Structured programming techniques such as selection, iteration, and variables
    • Procedural programming fundamentals including functions with arguments

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to microcomputer/microcontroller structure from a programmer’s perspective
    • Programmer’s model of the microcontroller
    • Addressing modes and memory types
    • Tool usage (assembler, downloader, simulator, debugger)
    • Microcontroller instruction set
    • Assembly language program structure, including comparisons to high-level languages
    • I/O port configuration and usage
    • Timer subsystem
    • A/D conversion
    • Interrupts, including their use related to the timer and external sources such as pushbuttons
    • Asynchronous serial communication (UART subsystem)
    • Tests and review

    Laboratory Topics
    • Tools familiarization: assemble, download, run, and simulate a program given to the student
    • The first student-written program: assemble, download, run, and simulate a program written by the student
    • Simple I/O program, Button I/O
    • Bit banging the LCD display
    • Keyboard scanning program
    • Timing subsystem program
    • A/D program
    • Interrupt-driven program
    • UART serial communication program

    Coordinator
    Dr. Adam Livingston
  
  • CE 2812 - Embedded Systems II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds on CE 2801  and introduces C as a portable high-level language for embedded systems programming. Topics include C language syntax, variables, and pointers. C functions are covered with special attention to passing by value versus passing by reference. Specialized embedded topics included using pointers to interact with microcontroller subsystems, creating interrupts in C, and the C/assembly interface. Designing modular application by use of multiple files is emphasized throughout the course. Laboratory exercises employ peripheral subsystems as well as reinforce other key topics. (prereq: CE 2801 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Combine assembly and a high-level language to complete basic embedded system programming tasks
    • Employ embedded systems development tools
    • Link multiple files to create a larger application
    • Design and write C functions
    • Use interrupts in C to perform I/O
    • Use the various subsystems of the processor in practical applications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • High-level programming fundamentals including control structures and subroutines
    • Structured assembly language programming
    • Good program documentation and design techniques including flowcharting and pseudocode

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to C as a portable language
    • Review control structures typical of high-level languages
    • Pointer basics, null pointers, addressing, indirection, arrays, pointers, character string processing
    • C arithmetic and bitwise operators.
    • Traditional C and C99 types and custom types with typedef
    • Interaction with registers via C pointers
    • C structures
    • Function pointers
    • The C standard library
    • Dynamic memory with malloc and free
    • C functions and parameter passing (by value and by reference)
    • Using multiple files in an application, header files, conditional compilation
    • Serial communication and the USART subsystem
    • Design of a buffered serial API
    • Basic console I/O
    • Basic round-robin context switching

    Laboratory Topics
    • Debugging a simple C program on the embedded system
    • Using C to interact with microcontroller peripherals
    • Mixed C/assembly program
    • Console I/O
    • Round-robin context switcher

    Coordinator
    Dr. Adam Livingston
  
  • CE 2820 - Embedded Systems III

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the third in the embedded system sequence. In this course students will carry out a complete design and implementation of an embedded system over the course of the term with weekly milestones. Topics include a review of C programming, a review of interrupt driven I/O and review of typical microcontroller peripherals such as the UART, timer-counters and others. The I2C and SPI serial protocols will be introduced along with peripherals that implement these protocols. Interface timing will be discussed, and calculations performed to determine the timing compatibility between external devices and the microcontroller based on data sheet information.  System-on-chip concepts will be introduced along with techniques for developing custom peripherals in a hardware description language. (prereq: CE 2812 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the I2C interface to communicate with external devices
    • Use asynchronous serial to communicate with another computer
    • Describe typical control bus signals for classic Motorola and Intel processors
    • Understand address decoding for memory-mapped peripherals
    • Use data sheet information for performing a timing analysis to verify compatibility between external components and a microcontroller
    • Deploy custom peripherals coded in HDL to an programmable SoC device
    • Design a simple memory-mapped peripheral in HDL to generate PWM signals to control actuators
    • Design software to control on-chip and custom peripherals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Good program design techniques
    • Assembly language programming
    • C programming
    • Combination and sequential digital logic
    • Hardware description language skills

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to I2C and SPI serial protocols and peripherals
    • Servo motor operation
    • Review of timer/counter concepts and PWM signals
    • Memory timing for reads and writes on a memory bus
    • Timing analysis to demonstrate timing compatibility between memory and the microcontroller
    • Development of custom peripherals in HDL
    • Generation and deployment of custom systems on a programmable SoC platform
    • Review use of string operations to create a command line interface

    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction of an incremental design of an embedded system using provided milestones
    • Deploy base SoC computer
    • Generate custom PWM signal generator, add to SoC base computer and deploy to hardware
    • Deploy vendor-supplied streaming video peripheral
    • Generate API for control of complex peripherals via I2C and/or SPI
    • Generate custom peripheral for video capture, add to SoC computer and deploy to hardware

    Coordinator
    Dr. Adam Livingston
  
  • CE 3101 - Digital Electronics and Computer Interfacing

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Digital electronics are diode and transistor circuits that operate on digital signals. This course introduces the design and analysis of diode circuits, BJT circuits, and MOSFET circuits with a focus on digital logic families. It also examines electronic circuits commonly used to interface sensors or actuators to the computer. Interfacing topics include analog-to-digital signal conditioning using operational amplifiers, digital-to-analog conversion using standard solid-state components, and large-signal biasing of BJT and MOSFET drivers. (prereq: EE 2050 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and design circuits using first, second, and third approximation diode models
    • Analyze and design BJT logic circuits
    • Analyze and design NMOS and CMOS logic circuits
    • Describe, use, and mix the standard 7400, 74LS00, 74HC00, and CD4000 logic families
    • Design, simulate, and test signal conditioning circuits and filters used to interface analog sensors to a computer
    • Design simulate, and test interface circuits for small and large DC loads

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic circuit elements including resistance, inductance, capacitance, as well as current and voltage sources
    • Circuit analysis techniques including Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s laws, nodal analysis, and power calculation
    • Ideal op-amp terminal characteristics

    Course Topics
    • Physical structure of the diode, BJT, and MOSFET semiconductor devices 
    • I-V characteristics of the diode, BJT, and MOSFET semiconductor devices 
    • Nodal and mesh analysis with diode, BJT, and MOSFET approximation models 
    • Resistor-transistor logic gates (RTL)
    • Transistor-transistor logic gates (TTL)
    • MOSFET depletion mode logic gates (NMOS)
    • Complementary MOSFET logic gates (CMOS) 
    • Electrical and timing characteristics of standard 7400 and CD4000 logic families
    • Operational amplifier circuits for inverting, non-inverting, summation, and difference
    • Linear mapping of sensor output to analog-to-digital converter input envelope  
    • First and second order operational amplifier circuits for low-pass, high-pass, and bandpass filtering. 
    • Buffer, transistor, and opto-isolation models for small and large DC loads. 
    • PSPICE for semiconductor circuit simulation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulate, instrument, and measure semiconductor device characteristics
    • Design, simulate, instrument, and measure logic gates fabricated using discrete semiconductor components. 
    • Design, simulate, instrument, and measure analog sensor signal conditioning circuits. 
    • Design, simulate, instrument, and measure buffer, transistor, and opto-isolator circuits for interfacing small and large DC loads to a computer.

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russ Meier
  
  • CE 3200 - Wireless Sensor Networks

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Mass sensor networks are an important part of modern industrial, environmental, security, and military systems. Remote sensors eliminate the need for complex processing at each local node. Instead, processing can be completed at a distant master control computer. Remote sensors send information to control computers either by self-initiating a communication cycle or as a response to a command from the control computer. Wireless networking technology allows the sensor nodes to operate autonomously without a tethered connection. This class introduces the theories of sensor networks as well as common standards such as IEEE 802.15.4 (ZigBee) and IEEE 1451. Topics are explored through lectures, homework assignments, and laboratory projects. (prereq: CE 2812  or EE 2931 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe fundamental networking topics like protocols, topology, addressing, and routing
    • Describe RFID technologies and their use in sensor networks
    • Describe IEEE 802.15.4 as a common protocol suite for sensor networks
    • Describe the ZigBee protocol stack including security and its use in sensor networks
    • Implement RFID and ZigBee sensor network components in the laboratory

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russell Meier
  
  • CE 4000 - Senior Design Project I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first course in the senior design sequence in which each student team works on a design project from conception through implementation and testing. The team first explores technology issues related to the project and then prepares a complete design. Teams meet regularly with the instructor to track technical and project management issues. Written reports and oral presentations are required. (prereq: completion of core courses through junior year (a maximum of 2 may be missing, or approved plan of study to complete the degree by the following fall quarter.))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects to a variety of customers in a public forum
    • Manage project resources, risks, and contingency plans
    • Elicit and document project requirements
    • Perform research and investigate technologies to reduce project risks and support design and planning
    • Identify and address relevant engineering standards and constraints in a design project context
    • Prepare appropriate documentation for a complex project
    • Prototype key or risky project components
    • Design, implement, and test hardware components and systems, if appropriate
    • Design, implement, and test software components and systems, if appropriate

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements
    • Team status meetings with advisor and client (if there is an identified client) weekly
    • Technology/research team presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant
  
  • CE 4010 - Senior Design Project II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second course in the senior design sequence. In this course, the student team implements the design developed in CE 4000 . Teams meet regularly with the instructor to track technical and project management issues. Complete project documentation, written reports and oral presentations are required. (prereq: CE 4000  taken in the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects to a variety of customers in a public forum
    • Manage project resources, risks, and contingency plans
    • Identify and address relevant engineering standards and constraints in a design project context
    • Prepare appropriate documentation for a complex project
    • Design, implement, and test hardware components and systems, if appropriate
    • Design, implement, and test software components and systems, if appropriate

    Prerequisites by Topic

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements
    • Team status meetings with advisor and client (if there is an identified client)
    • Design report team presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant
  
  • CE 4020 - Senior Design Project III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the third course in the senior design sequence, in which each student team works on a design project from conception through implementation and testing. Teams meet regularly with the instructor to track technical and project management issues. Written reports and oral presentations are required. (prereq: CE 4010  taken in the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects to a variety of customers in a public forum
    • Manage project resources, risks, and contingency plans
    • Identify and address relevant engineering standards and constraints in a design project context
    • Prepare appropriate documentation for a complex project
    • Design, implement, and test hardware components and systems, if appropriate
    • Design, implement, and test software components and systems, if appropriate

    Prerequisites by Topic

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements
    • Team status meetings with advisor and client (if there is an identified client)
    • Poster preparation
    • Student Project Show presentation
    • Senior debriefing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant
  
  • CE 4100 - Embedded System Fabrication

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on practical aspects of turning a laboratory prototype into a reliable production prototype. Lecture topics will follow a microprocessor-based embedded system design through the addition of support circuitry, production component selection, printed circuit board layout, and 3D design and printing of enclosures. Lab exercises will put these topics into practice as students will complete the design activities and assemble prototypes. (prereq: (CE 2812  or BE 3205  or EE 2920  and (EE 2060  or EE 2725 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify support circuitry necessary for simple embedded systems
    • Assess issues that arise when interfacing peripherals to a microcontroller
    • Describe criteria for component selection
    • Summarize relevant electromagnetic compatibility issues related to a given circuit 
    • Explain considerations for printed circuit board layout
    • Create a printed circuit board layout starting with schematic capture
    • Prepare circuit board design for fabrication
    • Complete assembly of printed circuit board including surface mount components
    • Explain processes for board bring-up and firmware programming in a manufacturing environment
    • Design an enclosure for an embedded system in 3D modeling software
    • Utilize rapid prototyping techniques to create an electronics enclosure

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic embedded system design and programming
    • Basic circuit elements
    • Circuit analysis techniques

    Course Topics
    • Embedded system design considerations
    • Schematic capture concepts - symbols, packages, devices
    • Electronic component selection considerations - manufacturer, vendor, availability, package, cost
    • Interfacing to peripherals
    • Printed circuit board (PCB) considerations - layers, trace width and thickness, vias, clearance, mounting holes
    • Electromagnetic compatibility - regulations, design accommodations
    • Surface mount components - selection, assembly techniques
    • Selection of connectors, switches and indicators
    • Generation of files necessary for PCB fabrication and order process
    • 3D modeling techniques
    • 3D printing technologies and workflow
    • Board bring-up and programming firmware

    Laboratory Topics
    • Install and become familiarized with electronic design automation (EDA) software
    • Create custom component within EDA software
    • Complete schematic capture for given project within EDA software
    • Complete printed circuit board (PCB) layout within EDA software
    • Generate PCB fabrication files and order PCB from vendor
    • Introduction to 3D modeling and workflow to produce a 3D-printed object
    • Design an enclosure for given project in 3D modeling software
    • Assemble PCB, test and install firmware
    • Assemble complete project in 3D-printed enclosure

    Coordinator
    Dr. Darrin Rothe
  
  • CE 4800 - Advanced Digital Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course will cover the systematic digital systems design for application-specific digital circuits on field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The course will introduce top-down design processes to convert algorithms into high-level models using a hardware description language (such as VHDL or Verilog). Students will gain hands-on experience developing individual building block components, working up to designing a full digital system. This progression will focus on architecture, design methodologies, and optimization techniques. The course will also discuss hardware testing and design for testability to meet given performance specifications. (prereq: CE 1911  and CE 2820  or EE 2931  or EE 3910B )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply practical digital design process for FPGAs
    • Demonstrate proficiency in implementing high-level models using a hardware-description language
    • Translate software algorithm into optimized hardware architectures
    • Design digital systems with testing and testability in mind

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Fundamentals of combinational and sequential digital logic design
    • Exposure to hardware development language (e.g. VHDL)
    • High level programming language experience (C/JAVA)

    Course Topics
    • Digital logic review (2 Lectures)
    • Combinational component design (4 Lectures)
    • Sequential component design (4 Lectures)
    • Digital design process (4 Lectures)
    • Design optimization (3 Lectures)
    • Hardware testing (2 Lectures)
    • Review (1 Lecture)

     


    Laboratory Topics
    • Lab 1: Combinational modeling
    • Lab 2: Hierarchical modeling
    • Lab 3: Dataflow modeling
    • Lab 4: State machine design
    • Lab 5: Sequential component design
    • Lab 6: Modeling memory
    • Lab 7: Algorithmic state machine datapath design
    • Lab 8: High-level system design
    • Lab 9: High-level system verification

    Coordinator
    Dr. Adam Livingston

  
  • CE 4930 - Computer Architecture II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Modern microprocessor architectures extend pipelined micro-architecture in a number of ways in order to exploit instruction-level parallelism (ILP) and thread-level parallelism (TLP). Deep pipelines, superscalar pipelines, out-of-order instruction execution, instruction re-ordering and speculative execution are example techniques exploiting ILP. Similarly, multiprocessor techniques such as maintaining a coherent shared memory among multiple cores are examples that exploit thread-level parallelism. These examples challenge the fundamental architectural concept of single-instruction per clock-cycle and result in circuits that improve performance and enrich the user experience. This course explores these topics through lecture, in-class problems, reading assignments, and homework. (prereq: CE 1921 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe how deep pipelines exploit instruction level parallelism and increase clock rate
    • Describe how superscalar processors exploit instruction level parallelism to increase IPC
    • Describe how out-of-order execution improves performance in superscalar processors
    • Describe how speculative execution improves performance in microprocessor pipelines
    • Compare and contrast static and dynamic speculative execution techniques
    • Describe how multiprocessors exploit instruction and thread level parallelism
    • Discuss classic microprocessor case studies such as the MIPS R4000, Intel Pentium, Motorola 88110, Intel Pentium Pro, and IBM Cell multiprocessor

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russell Meier
  
  • CE 4940 - VLSI Design Techniques

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the design and fabrication of custom-made integrated circuits. The course draws on students’ knowledge of electronic circuit theory, semiconductor device physics, digital logic design, circuit simulation, and software algorithms. A variety of combinational and sequential logic implementation styles are described and simulated including static CMOS, dynamic CMOS, domino logic, static RAM, and dynamic RAM. Simulation is completed using the SPICE input language and fabrication process models. Students are also introduced to classic algorithms in automated synthesis including algorithms for logic reduction and partitioning, placement of circuit blocks, and routing of interconnection between circuit blocks. (prereq: CE 1911 , CE 2812  or EE 1910 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the equations of conduction to describe VLSI circuit performance parameters including power consumption, rise time, fall time, threshold voltage, and noise margins
    • Describe VLSI implementation styles including static CMOS, dynamic CMOS, and domino logic
    • Describe how static and dynamic RAM are implemented as VLSI circuits
    • Describe classic algorithms in logic reduction, placement, and routing
    • Use the SPICE input language to describe and simulate VLSI circuits
    • Use transistor layout software to design transistor level circuits

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Combinational and sequential logic
    • C programming

    Course Topics
    • Transistor equations of conduction
    • CMOS implementation styles (static CMOS, dynamic CMOS, domino logic)
    • CMOS logic gate design
    • Static and dynamic RAM circuits
    • Performance analysis of CMOS circuits including power, rise time, fall time, threshold voltage, and noise margins
    • Graph theoretic algorithms in partitioning and routing

    Laboratory Topics
    • Design and simulation of CMOS logic circuits using the PSPICE input language
    • Design and simulation of memory circuits using the PSPICE input language
    • Design and simulation of transistor layouts
    • Implementation of simple graph theoretic VLSI algorithms in the C programming language

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russell Meier
  
  • CE 4951 - Networking I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents principles of data communication and computer networks, with emphasis on the physical and data link layers of communication networks. Topics include network topology, the principles of signaling on physical links, transmission media, modulation, error control, flow control, LANs, and Ethernet protocols. The laboratory includes experiments on data communication signaling and error control. The laboratory also includes a course project involving both hardware and software aspects of network systems. (prereq: MA 262  and (CE 2812  or EE 2931 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe basic terminology pertaining to data communications and networking, including the roles of various protocol layers in a protocol architecture
    • Determine the frequency-domain spectrum of a random binary data signal, and of a square-wave binary data signal
    • Determine and describe data sections transferred and those retransmitted when using either stop-and-wait or sliding-window data link control protocols, under various data-error and data-flow conditions
    • Determine the CRC frame-check sequence (FCS) transmitted for a given data block, and determine whether or not errors are detected within a received data block that includes a CRC FCS
    • Determine data link capacities using Nyquist and Shannon limits
    • Determine and sketch NRZ, RZ, Manchester, AMI, and differentially encoded data waveforms for a given information data bit sequence
    • Determine ASK, FSK, and PSK modulated signal waveforms for a given information data bit sequence
    • Describe the operation of CSMA/CD protocols for an Ethernet LAN
    • Calculate data-transfer delays and network utilization for common network configurations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Combine assembly and a high-level language to complete basic embedded system programming tasks
    • Employ embedded systems development tools
    • Link multiple files to create a larger application
    • Design and write C functions
    • Use interrupts in C to perform I/O
    • Use the various subsystems of the processor in practical applications
    • Perform fundamental probability calculations, for example, the probability that at least three of five dice rolled have values of either 1 or 2 showing

    Course Topics
    • Overview of communication & networking (3 classes)
    • Signal and data representation (1.5 classes)
    • Spectra, bandwidth, noise, impairments (1.5 classes)
    • Transmission media and typical signals (2 classes)
    • Data encoding, modems and digital modulation (3 classes)
    • Data link control (error control and flow control) (2 classes)
    • Error detection and error correction techniques (2 classes)
    • Local Area Networks, ethernet, and LAN Performance (4 classes)
    • Homework periods, review, and examinations (3 classes plus final)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Students in this course will work in teams in the laboratory. Four or five experiments illustrate signaling concepts such as bandwidth measurements of a digital data signal, line coding techniques, modulation of digital data, bit-error rate measurements for digital data transfer on a baseband data link that has noise, and Ethernet CSMA/CD principles. The remaining laboratory periods are allocated to provide time for student teams to complete an assigned course project. A typical course project has student teams (of three or four students each) develop and implement a host node/station that exchanges text messages with the nodes/stations developed by other student teams. Each node/station may be implemented with any technology, but students typically implement their stations on microcomputer platforms used in earlier courses. Each node/station must interoperate with other nodes/stations in accordance with an interoperability standard developed by the students, and that standard defines parameters such as the shared network medium, the information transfer rate on that medium, header specifics, and (usually optional) error detection protocols

    Coordinator
    Dr. Russell Meier
  
  • CE 4961 - Networking II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the data transfer and software aspects of networks common in computing. The layered architecture of the modern Internet is studied with a focus on many of the common protocols used to transfer information and to provide services. The laboratory projects provide an opportunity for teams of students to implement servers and clients using various protocols. (prereq: CS 3841 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand what networking protocols are and how they are specified
    • Understand the protocols of the Internet
    • Write applications using socket connections
    • Understand the implementation and operation of Internet services
    • Understand how societal issues such as privacy and confidentiality are related to network protocol design, implementation, and application

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • General familiarity with computer networks
    • Software development skills

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to network protocols
    • Ethernet
    • IP, ICMP, IPv4 addressing
    • UDP, TCP
    • Routing
    • Network Address Translation
    • Domain names
    • HTTP
    • Security
    • Mail, Telnet, FTP, SSH
    • IP v.6
    • XML, SOAP, RPC, Web services
    • Exams and reviews

    Laboratory Topics
    • Network utilities
    • Raw socket programming
    • UDP communication
    • TCP communication
    • Protocol design
    • Web servers and clients

    Coordinator
    Dr. Darrin Rothe
 

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