Jul 20, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Army

  
  • AR 1001 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 1

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab instruction is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 1002 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 2

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab instruction is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques Offered winter term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 1003 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 3

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered spring term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 1100 - Foundations of Officership

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Introduction to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities. This course is designed to establish a framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values. Additionally, the semester addresses “life skills” including fitness and time management. The AR 1100 course is designed to give the student an accurate insight into the Army profession and the officer’s role within the Army. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • Army customs and courtesies
    • How to study and learn
    • Army values and ethos
    • Time management
    • Goal setting process
    • Health and fitness
    • Introduction to critical thinking
    • Army leadership
    • Communication process
    • Army writing style
    • Persuasive communication

  
  • AR 1200 - Basic Leadership 1

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is similar to that of AR 1100  and is designed to build on the experiences of the fall term and further broaden the student’s introduction to the Army. Students receive an introduction to communication principles, military briefings, effective writing, problem solving, goal setting, listening and speaking skills, and counseling. Students are provided a broad overview of life in the Army, including the employment benefits and work experiences of junior officers. Offered winter term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 1201 - Basic Leadership 2

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of AR 1200  and is designed to build on the experiences of the fall and winter terms and further broaden the student’s introduction to the Army. Students receive an introduction to communication principles, military briefings, effective writing, problem solving, goal setting, listening and speaking skills, and counseling. Students are provided a broad overview of life in the Army, including the employment benefits and work experiences of junior officers. Offered spring term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 1800 - American Crucible: The Military and the Development of the United States

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course explores American military history from the colonial period to the present through the lens of military affairs and primarily through the land component of the military, the Army. This course will use the Army and the military itself as a lens through which to explore the impact of governmental structures and policies, international affairs, societal change, technological and industrial innovation, and geography on American development. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 2001 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 4

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 2002 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 5

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab instruction is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered winter term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 2003 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 6

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in Military Science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered spring term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 2100 - Individual Leadership Studies

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    Students enrolled in AR 2100 are placed in a wide variety of group exercises, both inside and outside the classroom, designed to emphasize the fundamentals of team building, decision making, conflict resolution, organizing and planning, cultural awareness, theories of leadership, avoiding analytical pitfalls, critical thinking, Army problem solving process, ethical reasoning and situational ethics, philosophy of ethics and military service, character building, and counseling and coaching methods. Offered fall term. (prereq: AR 1100 , AR 1200  and AR 1201 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • Fundamentals of team building
    • Decision making
    • Conflict resolution
    • Organizing and planning
    • Cultural awareness
    • Theories of leadership
    • Avoiding analytical pitfalls
    • Critical thinking
    • Army problem solving process
    • Ethical reasoning and situational ethics
    • Philosophy of ethics and military service
    • Character building
    • Counseling and coaching methods

  
  • AR 2200 - Leadership and Teamwork 1

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is similar to that of AR 2100  and is designed to focus on the student’s own self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes. Experiential learning activities, both inside and outside the classroom, are designed to challenge cadets’ current beliefs, knowledge and skills. Offered winter term. (prereq: AR 1100 , AR 1200  and AR 1201 ; or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 2201 - Leadership and Teamwork 2

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of AR 2200  and focuses on the student’s own self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes. Experiential learning activities, both inside and outside the classroom, are designed to challenge cadets’ current beliefs, knowledge and skills. Offered spring term. (prereq: AR 1100 , AR 1200  and AR 1201 ; or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3001 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 7

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented, small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military science courses. This Lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3002 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 8

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military science courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered winter term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3003 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 9

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military science courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered spring term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3100 - Leadership and Problem Solving

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    AR 3100 is designed to help prepare students for the challenges of accepting greater responsibility in teaching and participating in Military Science and Leadership Labs. It is the first course that all students seeking a commission in the United States Army must take. Students will be introduced to the principles in the Leader Development Program, the Army’s troop leading procedures, and taught how to plan and conduct individual and small unit training. Key concepts covered in this course are ethical decision making, effective followership/leadership/supervision, team dynamics, diversity, change management, creating a vision, structured review and analysis process for events, leadership behavior and peer evaluations, effective feedback, leadership self-assessment/inventory, understanding bias, mentoring, and organizational climate. Offered fall term. (prereq: AR 1100 , AR 1200 , AR 1201 , AR 2100 , AR 2200 , and AR 2201  or consent of instructor) (coreq: AR 3101 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • Army ethical decision making
    • Effective followership/leadership/supervision
    • Team dynamics
    • Diversity
    • Change management
    • Creating a vision
    • Structured review and analysis process for events
    • Leadership behavior and peer evaluations
    • Effective feedback
    • Leadership self-assessment/inventory
    • Understanding bias
    • Mentoring
    • Organizational climate

  
  • AR 3101 - Applied Leadership Laboratory 1

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Practical exercises and evaluations in military leadership skills including operational planning, quality management and inspections, and controlling small groups in realistic settings. Students develop training programs, plan training sessions, and present classes for this and other Military Science Leadership labs. Topics include individual and small unit movement techniques, communicating by tactical radio, water survival (drownproofing), drill and ceremony, and land navigation skills. Offered fall term. (prereq: AR 1100 , AR 1200 , AR 1201 , AR 2100 , AR 2200 , and AR 2201  or consent of instructor) (coreq: AR 3100 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3200 - Leadership and Ethics 1

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is similar to that of AR 3100  and is designed to continue the student’s development as a leader as they receive further instruction in interpersonal communication, values and ethics, and leadership. Additionally, students receive an introduction and overview of various summer training opportunities such as, airborne school and Advanced Camp. Students are also introduced to the many career choices the Army has to offer. Offered winter term. (prereq: AR 3100  and AR 3101 ) (coreq: AR 3202 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3202 - Applied Leadership Laboratory 2

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Practical exercises and evaluations in military leadership skills including operational planning, quality management and inspections, and controlling small groups in realistic settings. Students develop training programs, plan training sessions, and present classes for Military Science Leadership labs. Topics include field training exercises, tactical leadership, and decision making. Offered winter term. (prereq: AR 3100  and AR 3101 ) (coreq: AR 3200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3300 - Leadership and Ethics 2

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to continue the student’s development as a leader as he/she receives further instruction in interpersonal communication, values and ethics, and leadership. Additionally, students receive an introduction and overview of various summer training opportunities such as, airborne school and the Advanced Camp. Students are also introduced to the many career choices the Army has to offer. Offered spring term. (prereq: AR 3200  and AR 3202 ) (coreq: AR 3303 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3303 - Applied Leadership Laboratory 3

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Practical exercises and evaluations in military leadership skills including operational planning, quality management and inspections, and controlling small groups in realistic settings. Students develop training programs, plan training sessions, and present classes for Military Science Leadership labs. Topics include field training exercises, tactical leadership, decision making, and squad level offensive and defensive battle drills. Offered spring term. (prereq: AR 3200  and AR 3202 ) (coreq: AR 3300 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 3964 - Military Science Practicum

    6 lecture hours 0 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    Off-campus summer program offered at the U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Basic Camp, Fort Knox, Kentucky. This program counts as completion of the Basic Course. The six-week program provides the student with practical leadership experience and extensive practical training in fundamental leadership and military skills. Students do not incur military obligation, do not pay expenses, but do receive pay for this training. The program is offered in lieu of AR 1100 , AR 1200 , AR 1201 , AR 2100 , AR 2200 , and AR 2201 . Offered only during the summer. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4001 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 10

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military sciences courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4002 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 11

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military science courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered winter term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4003 - Military Physical Training Laboratory 12

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This goal-oriented small unit approach to physical conditioning and military drill is required for all cadets enrolled in military science courses. This lab is conducted four times per week. It is oriented toward strength, mobility and endurance development. Physical development and the ability to master principles of small unit leadership are also stressed. Student physical development is measured via the Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of push-ups, sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Leadership Lab is conducted on Fridays and stresses fundamentals of unit organization, wear of the uniform, and practical application of small unit leadership techniques. Offered spring term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4100 - Officership

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    Focuses students on two main areas: the Military Decision-Making Process and the Army’s Training Management System. It also covers several critical areas needed to operate effectively as an Army officer, including coordinating activities with staffs, counseling theory and practice within the “Army context,” and ethics. Offered fall term. (prereq: AR 3300  and AR 3303 ) (coreq: AR 4101 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Course Topics
    • How to lead a training meeting
    • Responsibility, authority, and functions of army commanders and staff organizations
    • Equal opportunity
    • Sexual harassment/assault prevention
    • Suicide prevention
    • Cross cultural competencies
    • Developing others
    • Army leaders’ ethics
    • Uniformed code of military justice
    • Administrative discipline and separations
    • Awards
    • Risk management

  
  • AR 4101 - Advanced Leadership Laboratory 1

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Weekly practical exercises and preparatory periods for command staff functions, drill and ceremonies, assistant instructor roles and field training exercises. Students perform roles of cadet officers in assigned positions or tasks. Offered fall term. S/U grade assessment (prereq: AR 3300  and AR 3303 )  (coreq: AR 4100 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4200 - Leadership and Management 1

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is similar to that of AR 4100  and focuses on completing the transition from Cadet to Lieutenant. Students receive instruction on the legal aspects of decision-making and leadership, operations from the tactical to strategic level, administrative and logistical management, and a series of Capstone Seminars focusing on entering the Army as a new Lieutenant. These seminars require students, both individually and collectively, to apply their knowledge to solve problems and confront situations commonly faced by junior officers. Offered winter term. (prereq: AR 4100  and AR 4101 ) (coreq: AR 4202 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4202 - Advanced Leadership Laboratory 2

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Weekly practical exercises and preparatory periods for command staff functions, drill and ceremonies, assistant instructor roles and field training exercises. Students perform roles of cadet officers in assigned positions or tasks. Offered winter term. (prereq: AR 4100  and AR 4101 ) (coreq: AR 4200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4300 - Leadership and Management 2

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    Focuses on completing the transition from cadet to lieutenant. Students receive instruction on the legal aspects of decision-making and leadership, operations from the tactical to strategic level, administrative and logistical management, and a series of Capstone Seminars focusing on entering the Army as a new Lieutenant. These seminars require students, both individually and collectively, to apply their knowledge to solve problems and confront situations commonly faced by junior officers. Offered spring term. (prereq: AR 4200  and AR 4202 ) (coreq: AR 4303 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4303 - Advanced Leadership Laboratory 3

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Weekly practical exercises and preparatory periods for command staff functions, drill and ceremonies, assistant instructor roles and field training exercises. Students perform roles of cadet officers in assigned positions or tasks. Offered spring term. S/U grade assessment (prereq: AR 4200  and AR 4202 ) (coreq: AR 4300 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AR 4995 - Independent Study in Military Science and Leadership

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Independent study of special topics in Military Science under faculty supervision. Topics selected by student/faculty conference. Course can be taken for 1-3 credits. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended


Biomedical Engineering

  
  • BE 410 - Biomaterials

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents principles related to the selection and use of biomaterials. Topics covered include the general properties and behavior of materials, the use of phase diagrams, the use of Pourbaix diagrams, properties and biomedical applications of particular metals, properties and biomedical applications of particular ceramics, properties and biomedical applications of particular polymers, a survey of composite and textile materials, wound healing, and the interaction between living tissues and artificial materials. (prereq: BI 102 , CH 222 , ME 207 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the structure of solids as they relate to the use of engineering materials
    • Describe the mechanical properties of typical engineering materials
    • Interpret phase diagrams and use them to understand typical material processing procedures such as heat-treatment
    • Describe the typical advantages and disadvantages of metals, polymers, and ceramics as biomaterials
    • Solve biomedical engineering problems related to selection and processing of metallic, polymeric, and ceramic biomaterials
    • Describe specific advantages and disadvantages of a variety of common biomaterials
    • Describe typical corrosion and fatigue processes and evaluate the expected corrosion and fatigue response to typical biomaterials.
    • Describe and solve engineering problems related to typical processing techniques for metals, polymers, and ceramics
    • Describe some typical materials used in sutures, artificial heart valves, oxygenator membranes, TAHs and VADs, pacemaker electrodes, dialyzer membranes, contact lens, implantable lens, space filling implants, orthopedic implants, bone cements, and dental implants
    • Consider, evaluate and discuss the global, economic, environmental, and societal impacts of the use of particular biomaterials
    • Independently investigate the professional literature regarding a timely biomaterials topic and present findings

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Biochemical terminology, common proteins, common protein structures
    • Basic atomic bonding
    • Basic thermodynamic principles
    • Introductory statics and strength of materials

    Course Topics
    • Material properties: structure of solids, mechanical properties, corrosion/degradation of materials, and material testing
    • Phase diagrams as they relate to biomaterials
    • Metals: metallic bonding, metallic crystal structure, dislocations, strengthening mechanisms, phase diagrams, phase transformations, corrosion
    • Ceramics: bonding and structure, degradation, fracture mechanics, piezoelectric properties, glass ceramics, apatite ceramics, carbon
    • Polymers: polymerization process, polymer structure, viscoelastic behavior, degradation
    • Composite and textile materials and their properties
    • Tissue/material interaction; biocompatibility, surface properties, ASTM testing standards, effects of artificial materials on the body, effects of the body on artificial materials
    • Student presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Charles S. Tritt
  
  • BE 411 - Biomechanics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the biomechanics of human movement, with applications to occupational, rehabilitation, forensic and sports biomechanics. Topics covered include kinematics; anthropometry; kinetics; mechanical work, energy, and power; synthesis of human movement; muscle mechanics; repetitive motion and low back injuries. (prereq: BI 2305  or BI 2306 , and ME 206 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define the terms, anatomical axes, and planes associated with human movement
    • Understand the physiology associated with skeletal muscle contractions, strength evaluation, joint mechanics, energy requirements, and fatigue
    • Understand the principles and use of electromyography as a biomechanics research tool
    • Define the design and behavior of the instrumentation, transducers, force plates, etc. used to collect and process human movement data
    • Develop 2-D link-segment models from basic anthropometric and kinematic data
    • Obtain inverse solutions of joint moments and reaction forces from kinematic and force plate data
    • Design and conduct a human-movement based experiment to test a biomechanical problem and draw scientific conclusions.
    • Obtain knowledge of state-of-the-art solutions through peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings, and vendor websites, to analyze and solve contemporary open-ended problems.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Knowledge of engineering statics, dynamics, and strength of materials
    • Human physiology and anatomy

    Course Topics
    • Review of muscle physiology and skeletal anatomy
    • Principles and use of electromyography
    • Anthropometry
    • Measurement and use of anthropometic data for the development of link-segment models
    • Center of mass and stability
    • Joint motion
    • Linear and angular kinematics
    • Kinematics and kinetics of elbow flexion
    • Analysis of kinematic gait data
    • Development and use of 2-D link-segment models to estimate joint moments, reaction and compressive forces
    • Vertical jump height and force plates
    • Occupational biomechanics - NIOSH lifting equation, injury mechanisms

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ahmed Sayed
  
  • BE 499 - Clinical Internship

    Variable credits
    Course Description
    Junior and senior biomedical engineering students have the option of working at an affiliated hospital. Students must apply for clinical internship positions; they are not assigned. All clinical internships must be approved by the biomedical engineering program director and the EECS department chair prior to registration. Documentation in the form of an engineering logbook must be submitted to the program director at the end of the internship. Student performance is evaluated and grade is assigned by the program director based on logbook content and internship supervisor’s input. (prereq: Junior standing, written permission from program director and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Execute and document clinical engineering work

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 1005 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the biomedical engineering (BME) profession including its unique technical, regulatory and other characteristics. Students explore the operating principles, characteristics and engineering considerations of a variety of commonly used biomedical devices.  Career options in BME are described, as are strategies for choosing electives and gaining experience (through internships, research, etc.) in relation to these career options. Finally, students are introduced to computer-aided design and basic fabrication techniques in this course.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify biomedical devices associated with the major sub-areas of biomedical engineering.
    • Identify career options for biomedical engineers and how choices as a biomedical engineering student may influence one’s options upon graduation.
    • Identify different types of engineering considerations that go into the design of common biomedical devices.
    • Explain the importance of regulation of the biomedical device industry.
    • List different types of safety considerations for biomedical devices.
    • Create a basic part for a biomedical device using computer-aided design and basic fabrication techniques.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to biomedical engineering and its career options
    • The MSOE BME curriculum and its relation to career paths and areas of biomedical engineering
    • Human factors and safety in biomedical engineering devices
    • Introduction to medical device regulation and standards
    • Survey of the engineering behind common biomedical devices
    • Introduction to computer-aided design

    Laboratory Topics
    • Fundamentals of electrical circuits
    • Computer-aided design
    • Fabrication techniques for prototype development

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 2200 - MATLAB Programming for Engineers

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the basics of computer programming and the use of MATLAB as a tool to solve problems in biomedical and biomolecular engineering. Each student is required to demonstrate proficiency in writing and documenting the testing of computer programs given a set of requirements. Concepts and tools specific to MATLAB are introduced, including the use of data and logical arrays, plotting and data visualization, and the use of built-in functions. General programming concepts and approaches, including data input/output, logical operations and selection, repetition, user-defined functions, and the use of advanced data types, are also introduced and reinforced through numerous in-class activities and laboratory projects. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Perform computations on scalars and multidimensional arrays from MATLAB command window
    • Create professional-looking plots using MATLAB commands
    • Use commands to retrieve data from the user or from input files into the workspace
    • Use commands to output data and other information to data file or the command window with appropriate formatting
    • Write MATLAB programs that require logical decision making involving un-nested and nested if and switch constructs
    • Write MATLAB programs that perform required repetition involving un-nested and nested while and for loops
    • Write MATLAB to perform computations and decisions on arrays by using logical arrays and vectorization
    • Create MATLAB functions that perform required tasks based on specified data inputs and outputs
    • Implement cell arrays and structure arrays in MATLAB code to manage complex data sets
    • Predict the outcome of given MATLAB code with specified inputs

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to MATLAB and its interface (2 lectures)
    • Handling variables and basic operations in MATLAB (2 lectures)
    • Data input and output (1 lecture)
    • Plotting and data visualization (1 lecture)
    • Program design (1 lecture)
    • Logical operations and selection (4 lectures)
    • Repetition (4 lectures)
    • Logical arrays and vectorization (2 lectures)
    • Creation and use of functions (4 lectures)
    • Cell and structure arrays (4 lectures)
    • Handles and advanced plotting options (2 lectures)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Command window computations, script file usage, plotting, basic data i/o, using functions (2 periods)
    • Working with large data arrays representing signals using array operations and statistics (2 periods)
    • Analyzing biomedical data using branching constructs and loops (2 periods)
    • Creating and using functions (2 periods)
    • Using cell and structure array concepts to interpret and analyze biomedical imaging files (2 periods)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Olga Imas
  
  • BE 3005 - Professional Topics in BME

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to a range of important professional biomedical engineering topics. These include, but are not limited to: finding and using technical literature; identifying codes and standards for medical devices and systems; the regulation of medical devices (including the FDA device approval process and QSR design control requirements); career options in BME; finding internships, jobs and graduate programs; intellectual property considerations; ethics considerations in the medical device industry (including regulations on human subject research); quality control in the manufacturing of medical devices; user experience of medical devices; and entrepreneurship and business aspects of healthcare and medical devices. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify what constitutes human subject research and describe the IRB approval process
    • Identify ethical considerations for scenarios involving the medical device industry
    • Identify relevant sources of standards and codes related to specific medical devices
    • Identify ways to mitigate patient risk associated with medical devices
    • Identify whether a device is an FDA medical device and its likely FDA classification
    • Describe FDA Quality System Regulation design controls and identify when they apply to the medical device design and manufacturing processes
    • Identify methods to ensure quality in the manufacture of medical devices
    • Identify salient considerations of the various career options in BME
    • Use formal methodology to identify design requirements
    • Describe the general options for protecting the intellectual property of medical device designs
    • Articulate different viewpoints of a current controversial issue, including how each impacts marketing and accessibility of medical devices.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to FDA regulation of the medical device industry and device classification
    • Codes and standards (including JCAHO, NFPA, NEC, AAMI, ANSI, 60601)
    • Introduction to intellectual property protection
    • Using library resources to research literature, standards and patents and navigate the FDA website
    • FDA QSR design control requirements overview
    • Identification of user requirements and design requirements for medical devices
    • Hazard analysis and risk mitigation in device design
    • Quality control processes for medical device manufacture
    • Medical device and healthcare economics and market analysis
    • Human subject research and the IRB process
    • Human factors and medical error involving devices
    • Career options in BME
    • Using career placement resources to find jobs and internships and apply for graduate school
    • Ethics in the medical device industry

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 3015 - Biomedical Engineering Design I

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to MSOE’s biomedical engineering design process and the medical device design process in general. The connection is made between MSOE’s BME design process and the FDA QSR design control requirements and common industrial practices. While the general engineering design process is described, emphasis is placed on special medical device design requirements. Students are assigned to teams and projects. Students conduct technical, market, standards, and intellectual property research related to their team’s assignment. Fundamental project management topics and techniques are covered. (prereq: completion of all BE, BI and EE courses in the BME curriculum through winter quarter of junior year or permission of program director if up to two such courses are not completed.)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively on a team to plan a long-term, team-based project
    • Follow FDA QSR guidelines to define design inputs for a medical device design
    • Produce a written document that effectively and efficiently communicates a project proposal. 
    • Determine the FDA device classification of a proposed device
    • Research relevant standards for a proposed medical
    • Conduct intellectual property research and market analysis to describe the prior art of a proposed design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basics of FDA device classification and QSR guidelines

    Course Topics
    • Design team formation, organization, and operation
    • Design problem definition
    • Project proposal documentation
    • Application of FDA QSR guidelines
    • Identification of customers and customer needs
    • Technical literature reviews including the systematic search of trade, medical, engineering, and intellectual property literature
    • Project budgeting and funding

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 3205 - Introduction to Sensors and Actuators

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces sensor, actuator, and mechatronic principles with emphasis on their biomedical applications. Specific topics covered include general characteristics of sensors and actuators, temperature sensors, magnetic sensors, and actuators (Hall effect sensors, solenoids, mechanical relays, servos, motors), mechanical sensors (speed sensing, strain gauges, accelerometers, and pressure sensors), and acoustic sensors and actuators (microphones, speakers, and ultrasonic sensors and actuators). The interfacing of sensors and actuators are also covered, particularly the theory and applications of field effect transistors (FETs). Practical system integration and control topics are also covered, but sophisticated control theory topics are deferred to later controls-focused courses. Laboratory experiences reinforce basic concepts and culminate with significant individual or small group projects. (prereq: EE 2725  or EE 2070 , EE 2905 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define mechatronics and recognize engineering problems to which mechatronic principles could appropriately be applied
    • Decompose complex mechatronic systems into a collection of standard and ad hoc sub-systems
    • Systematically select appropriate sensors for specific sensing applications
    • Systematically select appropriate actuators for specific applications
    • Systematically select appropriate digital controllers for specific mechatronic control applications
    • Integrate mechatronic components into a functional system
    • Create software to control mechatronic systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electrical quantities and components and linear circuit analysis
    • Fundamental quantities and principles of mechanics
    • Fundamental embedded programming concepts

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to mechatronic systems, performance characteristics of sensors and actuators (1 week)
    • Temperature sensing and control (1 week)
    • Introduction to FETs and FET circuits (2 weeks)
    • Electric and magnetic sensors and actuators (2 weeks)
    • Mechanical sensors and actuators (2 weeks)
    • Other sensors and actuators (1 week)
    • System integration and control (1 week)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Review and re-introduction to embedded systems and programming (1 week)
    • Temperature sensing and control (1 week)
    • FETs and FET circuits (2 weeks)
    • Magnetic sensors (1 week)
    • Magnetic actuators (1 week)
    • Mechanical sensors (1 week)
    • Mechanical actuators (1 week)
    • Major project (2 weeks)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Charles Tritt
  
  • BE 3405 - Biomedical Device Evaluation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course addresses the unique patient safety and efficacy concerns associated with medical devices and specifically how such devices are rigorously tested and evaluated. Classic experimental design and statistical techniques are used to compare device performance measures, assess accuracy, and test experimental hypotheses. The use and interpretation of statistical software is also covered in this course. (prereq: MA 3611 , senior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the general FDA process by which medical devices are able to enter the U.S. market
    • Identify and define the different FDA classifications for medical devices
    • Demonstrate familiarity with those standards that address medical device safety and efficacy: IEC, AAMI/ANSI, NFPA, UL
    • Design basic experiments to assess medical device efficacy, determine substantial equivalency, and how to properly analyze the statistical results from such experiments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Fundamentals of hypothesis testing: Understanding Type I and Type II errors, relationship between sample sizes, power
    • Foundation and application of common inferential statistics: t-tests, ANOVA, regression

    Course Topics
    • FDA requirements and the medical device regulatory process: pre-market approval, substantial equivalence, 510(k)
    • Use of standards in evaluation of medical device safety and efficacy (AAMI, ANSI, NFPA, UL)
    • Design of experiments to assess medical device efficacy
    • Applications and use of inferential statistics: t-test, ANOVA, regression, chi-square.
    • Case study data analysis
    • Design and execution of clinical trials for medical devices, biologics and drugs.

    Coordinator
    Dr. Olga Imas
  
  • BE 3500 - Bio-thermal-fluid Transport I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of a two-part course sequence in bio-thermal-fluid transport. Specific topics that are covered include thermodynamics, including property determination, phase diagrams, first and second law applications, and efficiency calculations; psychrometrics; and introductory topics in fluid mechanics. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define thermodynamics and give examples of problems that can be solved using thermodynamic principles
    • Determine the properties of pure substances using property tables, property diagrams and software
    • Use the phase rule to determine the number of degrees of freedom for a non-reacting mixture at equilibrium
    • Use phase diagrams, property tables, and software to determine the phases present in a mixture, their relative abundances and the properties of the mixture
    • Determine whether the ideal gas equation of state is appropriate for a given system
    • Determine the properties of pure ideal gases and mixtures of ideal gases
    • State the First Law of thermodynamics and apply it to solve closed system engineering problems and analyze and design steady flow devices relevant to biomedical engineering
    • State the Second Law of thermodynamics and use it to determine limits for thermodynamic cycles and assess performance of steady flow devices
    • Use psychrometric analysis to define the vapor content of atmospheric air and apply this to air conditioning processes
    • Describe basic fluid behavior.
    • Define viscosity and describe Newtonian fluid behavior
    • Solve basic fluid statics problems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Performing single variable integration
    • Evaluating and interpreting first partial derivatives

    Course Topics
    • Thermodynamic definitions; pressure definition and manometry; energy definition and modes of energy transfer
    • Properties of pure substances; phases and property diagrams; using property tables and software to determine properties; determination of phase; applying the ideal-gas equation of state
    • Boundary work, closed system energy balance, specific heats 
    • Conservation of mass, flow energy, energy balance application to control volumes and steady flow devices
    • Thermodynamic cycles and the second law of thermodynamics; irreversibilities; Carnot cycles and Carnot efficiency
    • Entropy; isentropic efficiency for steady flow devices
    • Gas mixtures; psychrometrics and analysis of air conditioning processes
    • Introduction to fluid phenomena and fluid statics
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Charles Tritt
  
  • BE 3515 - Bio-thermal-fluid Transport II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of a two-part series of courses in bio-thermal fluid transport. Specific topics that are covered include Bernoulli and mechanical energy balance equations, fluid properties of blood, internal flows, fluid kinematics, flow visualization and CFD, the continuity equation and its biomedical applications, the Navier-Stokes equation and its biomedical applications, external flows, differential component mass balance and its biomedical applications, the differential energy balance and its applications, steady heat conduction, transient heat conduction, forced convection, free convection, heat exchanger analysis and design, and the cooling of electronics. (prereq: MA 232  or MA 2323 , and BE 3500 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify situations in which the Bernoulli or mechanical energy balance equation is applicable and apply the appropriate equation to solve practical engineering problems
    • Differentiate between laminar and turbulent flows and describe where each is encountered in the human body
    • Apply the concept of flow resistance to solve pipe network problems
    • Define the different types of forces that fluid flow imparts on solid bodies and use correlations to estimate these forces for common geometries
    • Describe the rheological properties of blood
    • Set up classic and biomedical engineering problems using the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations and solve simple cases
    • Set up classic and biomedical engineering problems using differential mass and energy balances and solve simple cases
    • Apply constitutive relations related to mass diffusion and heat conduction
    • Solve simple problems involving conductive heat transfer
    • Solve simple problems involving convective heat transfer
    • Design heat and mass exchangers to meet specified requirements

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Thermodynamics
    • College level Newtonian physics for engineers
    • Calculus through ordinary differential equations

    Course Topics
    • Bernoulli and mechanical energy balance equation
    • Properties of blood
    • Flow in pipes and tubes
    • The continuity equation
    • Application of the Navier-Stokes equations
    • Differential component mass balance
    • Mechanisms of heat transfer
    • Differential energy balance
    • Steady heat conduction
    • Lumped system transient heat conduction
    • Forced convection
    • Heat and mass exchangers
    • Cooling of electronics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Charles Tritt
  
  • BE 3705 - Biomedical Electronics and Instrumentation

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the fundamental devices, circuitry, and techniques needed to acquire and process biomedical quantities and signals. Operating principals of semiconductor devices as well as their application are explained. The electrical characteristics of diodes, photodiodes, zener diodes, LED, and regulators and their applications are covered. Operational amplifiers are introduced and used in amplifier and filter circuits to process the signals. Non-ideal op amp properties, including finite gain, frequency response, stability, input and output resistances, bias currents and offset voltages, are treated in sufficient depth to permit design of high gain circuits capable of handling small DC and low frequency AC voltages.  (prereq: EE 3032 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Utilize semiconductor theory to explain the behavior of diodes.
    • Utilize diodes as sensor, actuators, rectifiers and regulators
    • Utilize transducers in the measurement of physiological signals of medical interest
    • Design basic electronic circuitry using operational amplifiers to amplify the signals produced by resistive pressure, flow and displacement transducers
    • Design basic passive filters and 2nd order active filters to process signals
    • Predict the overall performance of cascaded processing modules
    • Design circuitry to generate periodic voltage or current waveforms
    • Assess the stability of feedback systems with respect to oscillation
    • Assess the effect of non-ideal operational amplifier properties on circuit performance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • AC, DC, and transient circuit analysis in the time domain
    • AC, DC, and transient circuit simulation using Pspice or Multisim
    • Laplace circuit analysis
    • Fourier analysis
    • Bode plots
    • Ability to conduct laboratory experiments using function generators, power supplies, multi-meters, and oscilloscopes

    Course Topics
    • Semiconductor fundamentals
    • Diode fundamentals and applications
    • Amplification concepts using simple 3-element models: cascading and loading effects
    • Amplifier implementation using operational amplifiers: inverting, non-inverting, summing amplifiers
    • Difference amplifiers and fundamentals of instrumentation amplifiers
    • First and second order filters implemented with op amps, low pass, high pass, and band pass
    • Static non-ideal op amp characteristics: offset voltages and bias currents, finite gain and input and output resistances
    • Dynamic non-ideal op amp characteristics: finite bandwidth, frequency response, and slew rate
    • Stability of feedback amplifiers
    • Positive feedback, hysteresis, and relaxation oscillators

    Laboratory Topics
    • Design and simulate circuits containing diodes and operational amplifiers
    • Introduction to amplifier concepts using dependent sources and a circuit simulation program
    • Design and implementation of basic amplifiers using op amps
    • Investigation of non-ideal operational amplifier characteristics
    • Linear, sinusoidal oscillator or relaxation oscillator design and implementation
    • Design and implementation of analog filters

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ahmed Sayed
  
  • BE 3905 - Biomedical Combined Laboratory I

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this laboratory is to present students with real-world biomedical engineering problems that overlap among the fields of physiology, bioinstrumentation, biosignal and systems analysis, and biotransport. Students will look at problems/laboratories from a joint perspective, which will enable students to solve multi-disciplinary problems. This course is intended to advance a student’s understanding of engineering concepts in biotransport and bioinstrumentation, as well as physiological systems, through laboratory exercises that involve design and analysis with heavy emphasis placed on critical evaluation of the engineering approaches. (prereq: BE 2200 , and BI 2315  or BI 2316 ) (coreq: BE 3515 , BE 3705 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Create and implement models of the cardiovascular system and its responses using theoretical approaches, Multisim, and MATLAB based on electric analogs
    • Apply biomedical signals and systems analysis methods to characterize measured physiological signals
    • Design basic electronic circuitry using operational amplifiers to amplify the signals produced by pressure and displacement transducers
    • Use computer models to determine parameters of experimental fluid and mass transfer systems
    • Predict and test the dynamic performance of fluid systems used for blood pressure measurement
    • Evaluate the applicability of analytical, experimental, and numerical methods
    • Execute and document laboratory projects effectively in a team

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Transient circuit analysis, Multisim circuit simulation, Laplace transforms and transfer functions, Fourier analysis
    • Structured computer programming in MATLAB
    • Multivariate calculus

    Course Topics
    • Lectures will provide background information for respective laboratories.

    Laboratory Topics
    • Windkessel model of the human cardiovascular system
    • Electrical measurement of angles; goniometer simulation
    • Analysis of steady cardiovascular flows
    • Dynamic analysis and testing of a blood pressure transducer and tubing system
    • Physiological multi-compartment modeling

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 3915 - Combined Lab II: Physiology, DSP & Biomechanics

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce the students to specific signal and system analysis tools used in physiological systems evaluation and quantification. The students will be presented with the real-world biomedical engineering problems that overlap the fields of physiology, digital signal processing, and biomechanics. The students will look at problems/laboratories from a joint perspective, which will enable the students to solve multidisciplinary problems in the biomedical engineering field. (prereq: EE 3221 ) (coreq: BI 2315  or BI 2316 , and BE 411 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply fundamental signal processing methodologies to analyze biomedical signals with a goal to extract system-specific pertinent information
    • Apply the appropriate statistics and interpreting their results when analyzing biomedical signals and systems
    • Demonstrate proficiency in using MATLAB (and/or other appropriate computer-aided tools) to analyze biomedical signals and systems, and for biomedical system modeling
    • Set up complex biomechanics problems and solve them using a multidisciplinary approach
    • Function on multidisciplinary teams  
    • Document engineering and experimental work

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Sampling
    • Discrete Fourier analysis
    • Digital filtering
    • Digital system analysis

    Course Topics
    • Review of cardiovascular physiology
    • Physiological origins of electrocardiographic (ECG) and other electrical cardiac signals
    • Overview of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology
    • Physiological origins of electroencephalographic (EEG) and other electrical neuro-signals
    • Review of joints and muscular system physiology
    • Physiological origins of electromyographic (EMG) and other related signals
    • Introduction to biomechanics and human movement
    • Anthropometry
    • Linear and angular kinematics
    • Force plates
    • Occupational biomechanics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Analysis of the EEG and local field potentials signals using appropriate signal processing methods
    • Hudgkin and Hoxley neuronal conductance-based model simulation
    • Windkassel aortic flow model simulation  
    • Analysis of ECG, cardiac electrogram, blood pressure, and cardiac cellular signals using appropriate signal processing methods
    • Analysis of EMG signals using appropriate signal processing methods
    • Biomechanics modeling and simulation
    • Anthropometry
    • Kinematics and kinetics of elbow flexion
    • Center of pressure and stability of stance

    Coordinator
    Dr. Olga Imas
  
  • BE 4005 - Biomedical Engineering Design II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course introduces students to a range of important professional biomedical engineering topics. In this course, students complete preliminary stages of design that culminate in a project proposal presentation. In this course, students will transition from feasibility and definition of design input requirements to technical design. Topics covered will include block diagrams, fabrication techniques and system level design, with an emphasis on subsystem interface specifications. The term will culminate in a system-level design review. (prereq: BE 3015 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Deliver a formal presentation proposing a biomedical engineering design project
    • Develop a system-level block diagram for a design solution to address a set of design input requirements for a biomedical engineering design project
    • Characterize interface specifications for a system-level design
    • Identify fabrication techniques commonly used in fabrication of biomedical engineering device prototypes
    • Conduct a hazard analysis for biomedical device design
    • Communicate design approaches and issues in a design review setting
    • Demonstrate familiarity with the IEEE Code of Ethics in the design process
    • Articulate if and how the FDA regulatory process would apply to a given device design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Fabrication techniques
    • Block diagrams in engineering design
    • Defining interface specifications in engineering design

    Laboratory Topics
    • Fabrication techniques for prototyping


    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack

  
  • BE 4015 - Biomedical Engineering Design III

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides continuation of the biomedical engineering design series. In this course, students progress to design at the levels of the subsystem and component. The concept of building and testing to meet predetermined requirements is reinforced, with particular attention toward achieving interface requirements between subsystems. Topics covered include power considerations and electrical noise and interference. The term will culminate in a subsystem-level design review. (prereq: successful completion of BE 4005  in fall term of the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify requirements for a subsystem of a biomedical engineering design project
    • Use engineering approaches to design a subsystem to meet requirements
    • Design, execute, and document appropriate tests to characterize subsystem performance
    • Communicate rationale and technical details of a design approach
    • Identify relevant global, societal, cultural, environmental, and economic issues associated with design decisions
    • Apply project management techniques to execute a long-term engineering design project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Power requirements in design
    • Electrical noise and interference in biomedical devices
    • Documentation of test plans and results
    • Project management techniques

    Laboratory Topics
    • Subsystem level design and testing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 4025 - Biomedical Engineering Design IV

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This is the final course in the biomedical engineering design series. In this course, students are expected to integrate subsystems to create a functional prototype of a biomedical device to address the original problem identified at the beginning of the sequence. Extensive system level verification tests are conducted and documented. The term culminates in public presentations of the final product. (prereq: successful completion of BE 4015  in winter term of the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Integrate subsystems into a functional prototype of a biomedical device
    • Recognize and discuss instances in the engineering design process in which ethical codes apply
    • Identify, perform, and document verification tests that assess the level to which a final prototype meets predetermined requirements
    • Communicate the outcomes of a design project in oral and written forms

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Verification testing and documentation

    Laboratory Topics
    • System-level design and testing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 4205 - Medical Imaging Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the modalities of clinical medical imaging. Students will learn the physics of how an image is created and how imaging equipment acquires the image. Medical image processing techniques are also practiced. Topics include image formation, X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, nuclear and image processing. (prereq: BE 2200 , EE 3221 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts related to radiation physics
    • Demonstrate an understanding of general image characteristics across all imaging modalities
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how a basic x-ray system works and how images are created
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how a basic CT system works and how images are created
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how a basic MRI system works and how images are created
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how a basic ultrasound system works and how images are created
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how a basic PET (and/or other nuclear medicine systems) works and how images are created
    • Proficiently apply fundamental image processing techniques to medical images
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical dilemmas in the medical imaging field
    • Proficiently apply MATLAB (or other computer-aided tools) to perform image analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Ability to write computer programs
    • Ability to apply convolution and perform data filtering
    • Ability to understand and apply Discrete Fourier Transforms
    • Ability to use MATLAB

    Course Topics
    • Overview of imaging modalities
    • Image characteristics
    • Image processing techniques
    • Fundamentals of radiation physics
    • Imaging formation using x-ray
    • X-ray imaging systems
    • Computer Tomography systems
    • Magnetic Resonance systems
    • Nuclear Imaging (emphasis on Positron Emission Tomography)
    • Ultrasound imaging

    Laboratory Topics
    • Image visualization and display
    • Image processing basics (filtering, edge detection, etc.)
    • 2D spatial frequency spectrum
    • Digital subtraction angiography
    • Filtered backprojection
    • Image segmentation
    • Image registration

    Coordinator
    Dr. Olga Imas
  
  • BE 4340 - Advanced Topics in Biomedical Digital Signal Processing

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce the students to the advanced topics and methodologies of digital signal processing and to have students apply these methodologies to the analysis of biological signals such as ECG, EEG, local field potentials, and phonocardiogram signals. Topics covered include Welch Periodogram power spectral estimation, cross-spectral estimation and coherence, introduction to time-frequency analysis, and short-segment Fast Fourier Transform. (prereq: BE 4800 or EE 3220 or equivalent with permission of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Possess advanced skills in digital signal processing necessary to function as a successful biomedical engineer, whose role involves quantitative analysis of biological signals
    • Implement using computer tools specific advanced signal processing methodologies that are commonly used for extraction of clinically relevant information from biological signals
    • Understand the challenges of digital signal processing when applied to the analysis of various biological signals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Continuous and discrete signals and systems concepts
    • Continuous and discrete Fourier Transform and Series
    • Sampling, aliasing, and spectral replication
    • Fast Fourier Transform
    • A/D conversion and quantization concepts
    • Digital filters (FIR and IIR) and digital filter design fundamentals
    • Z-Transforms and Unit Circle concepts
    • Statistical analysis
    • Proficiency in MATLAB programming

    Course Topics
    • Review of fundamental digital signal processing concepts such as sampling, aliasing, and Discrete Fourier Transform and Series (2 classes)
    • Overview of random (single) processes, stationarity, ergodicity and autocorrelation concepts (4 classes)
    • Standard methodologies of power spectral estimation such as Welch Periodogram and Blackman Tukey (4 classes)
    • Introduction of joint random processes, covariance and cross-correlation measures (4 classes)
    • Cross-spectral estimation and coherence (4 classes)
    • Introduction to time-frequency analysis. Short-Segment Fast Fourier Transform (4 classes)
    • Bi-weekly quizzes (2 classes total)

    Laboratory Topics
    • No laboratory. However, the students will be responsible for take-home computer projects involving the implementation of various signal processing methodologies and their application to the analysis of specific biological signals. The students will be required to submit a formal report

    Coordinator
    Dr. Olga Imas
  
  • BE 4705 - Biomedical Electronics and Instrumentation II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the production and distribution of biological signals, such as the ECG, EMG or EEG, and the electrodes and sensitive amplifiers needed to record them. Methods for reducing electrical noise and interference in the signals and conversion between analog and digital forms are included. Electronic feedback principles are applied to enhance system performance. (prereq: BE 3705 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Quantitatively predict electrical field distribution for simple geometries in a 3-dimensional body
    • Design, construct and test prototype circuits to detect and process electrical signals produced by the body
    • Account for the electrical behavior of electrodes in recording biopotentials
    • Recognize and mitigate the interference and noise in recording biological signals
    • Convert signals between digital and analog forms
    • Employ circuit simulation in the analysis and design of medical instrumentation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electronics: op amps
    • Physiology of nerves, muscles, and the respiratory system
    • Circuit simulation using Pspice or Multisim
    • Chemistry

    Course Topics
    • Biopotentials and the electrical behavior of biopotential electrodes
    • Voltage and current distribution in tissue from point, cylindrical and flat surfaces
    • ECG amplifier design
    • DC offset, common mode and high frequency interference in biopotential amplifier design and recording
    • Intrinsic noise: primarily thermal and 1/f noise in low level amplifiers
    • Analog to digital and digital to analog conversion

    Laboratory Topics
    • Electrical Interference Investigation
    • Measurement of current and voltage in biological media
    • ECG amplifier design project
    • Intrinsic noise investigation
    • Analog to digital and digital to analog conversion
    • Biological signal processing: Alpha wave detector

    Coordinator
    Dr. Icaro dos Santos
  
  • BE 4805 - Biomedical System Dynamics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents topics associated with analysis and modeling of dynamic systems as they apply to electrical, mechanical, fluid, thermal, and biomedical systems. The concepts of transfer function development, state space representation, modeling of linear time invariant (LTI) systems, linearization of non-linear systems and system performance are all considered. Through the exploration of system dynamics, the student is introduced to the analysis, design, and applications of feedback control systems. Systems will be modeled and analyzed using MATLAB and Simulink.    (prereq: ME 206 , EE 3032 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop models of mechanical, electrical, fluid, thermal, and biological systems in the frequency and time domain
    • Develop transfer functions for linear time-invariant (LTI) electrical, mechanical, fluid, thermal, and biological systems
    • Model LTI systems in state-variable form
    • Solve for the time-domain response (impulse, step, ramp) of first and second order systems
    • Write the transfer function of first and second order feedback control systems
    • Solve for the stability factors and system error for LTI systems
    • Use MATLAB and Simulink to analyze feedback control systems
    • Solve complex engineering problems using two or more domains of knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Representation of continuous and discrete signals in the time-domain
    • Representation of continuous and discrete signals in the frequency-domain
    • Determination of forces acting on rigid bodies in motion
    • Linear circuit analysis

    Course Topics
    • Transfer function development for electrical, mechanical, fluid, thermal, and biological systems
    • State-variable modeling of LTI systems
    • Linearizing non-linear systems
    • Reduced order modeling
    • Time response of 1st and 2nd order LTI systems
    • System identification
    • Designing for time response
    • Closed loop control characteristics (stability and sensitivity)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Icaro dos Santos
  
  • BE 4815 - Biomedical Feedback Control Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to expand topics in classical feedback control theory, introduce modern control theory, and to apply these topics to the solution of classicall feedback control problems in biomedical engineering related areas. The student will expand their abilities to analyze control systems using Routh-Hurwitz, root-locus, and frequency response analysis. The students will use those techniques for P, PI and PID feedback control system design. Topics related to the design of control systems in state space will also be introduced. MATLAB and Simulink will be used model control systems. In the laboratory, the student will design and implement both in software and in hardware the temperature control of an incubator. (prereq: BE 4805 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Solve for system stability
    • Use Root-Locus and Frequency Domain techniques to analyze and design first and second order LTI feedback control systems
    • Use Root-Locus technique to analyze and design first and second order LTI feedback control systems
    • Apply knowledge of classical analog feedback control theory in the laboratory
    • Design P, PI, and PID controllers to be used in first and second order systems
    • Use MATLAB and Simulink to analyze and design feedback control systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Develop models of mechanical, electrical (including ideal operational amplifiers), thermal and biological systems in the frequency and in the time domains
    • Develop the transfer function for linear time-invariant (LTI) electrical, mechanical, thermal, and biological systems
    • Model a LTI systems in state-variable form
    • Solve for the time-domain response (impulse, step, ramp) of first and second order feedback transfer functions
    • Write the transfer function of first and second order feedback control systems
    • Solve for the stability factors and system error for LTI control system
    • Use MATLAB and Simulink to analyze feedback control systems

    Course Topics
    • Introductory material
    • Stability analysis Routh-Hurwitz
    • Root-locus analysis and design
    • Frequency-response analysis and design
    • State space-based control
    • P, PI, and PID controllers

    Laboratory Topics
    • Use of Simulink in controls systems
    • Reverse engineering of a commercially available incubator
    • Step response and system identification of an incubator
    • On-off temperature controller of an incubator with some requirements based on IEC 60601-2-19
    • Temperature control of an incubator using P controller with some requirements based on IEC 60601-2-19
    • Temperature control of an incubator using PI controller with some requirements based on IEC 60601-2-19
    • Temperature control of an incubator using PID controller with some requirements based on IEC 60601-2-19

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Icaro dos Santos

  
  • BE 4975 - Biomedical Research Internship

    Variable credits
    Course Description
    This course provides biomedical engineering students the option of receiving academic credit for work at a research organization as a junior or senior student. Students must apply for research internship positions; these are not assigned or arranged by the program. Research internships done for academic credit must be preapproved by the biomedical engineering program director and the EECS department chair prior to BE 4975 registration. Documentation in the form of a laboratory notebook and summary report must be submitted to the program director at the end of the internship. To receive credit, students must document at least 80 hours of appropriate, supervised work. Student performance is evaluated and the grade assigned by the program director based on laboratory notebook and report content and the internship mentor’s input. (prereq: junior or senior standing, written permission from program director and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Execute and document biomedical engineering research in a laboratory setting

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 4980 - Independent Study

    Variable credits
    Course Description
    This course provides enrolled students the opportunity to investigate a specialized biomedical engineering topic. After an approved area of study has been selected, weekly meetings with the course advisor are required. A final report or similar documentation, the format of which is left to the discretion of the advisor, is required at the end of the term. (prereq: junior or senior standing, written permission from instructor and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Laboratory Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 4990 - Topics in Biomedical Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in biomedical engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack
  
  • BE 4991 - Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering with Laboratory

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in biomedical engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Laboratory Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey LaMack

Biological Sciences

  
  • BI 102 - Cell Biology and Genetics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to cell biology and genetics. Topics include chemical bonds, macromolecules, cell structure and function, cellular respiration, cell signaling, cellular reproduction, and genetics. In the laboratory, students must demonstrate proficiency in the scientific process, and will gain proficiency in basic laboratory techniques, experimental design, data recording, and scientific report writing. (prereq: one year of high school chemistry)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the general structure and correlate the chemical properties of atoms and molecules
    • Understand the structural and functional properties of the macromolecules found in living matter
    • List the structural components of mammalian cells and explain their function
    • List the types of transport processes occurring across the cell membranes and the energy sources for them
    • Explain the mechanisms of intercellular communication
    • Identify the enzyme’s structural domains important for the chemical kinetics
    • Describe the mechanisms of energy storage, transfer, release and use in cellular processes
    • Understand the processes of mitosis and meiosis and conditions under which they occur
    • Define the genetic terms and solve traditional genetic problems
    • Understand the processes of transcription and translation, including their regulation, and discuss their effect on the cell function
    • Explain how changes in genetic material can occur
    • Understand the major techniques involved in gene technology and describe specific uses of each technique
    • Design and perform a scientific experiment, including hypothesis generation and testing
    • Explain the use of statistical tests to interpret laboratory data
    • Write a scientific report in standardized format

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Chemical context of life and its environment
    • Structure and function of macromolecules
    • Cell structure, function, metabolism and communication
    • Cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis
    • Genetics and inheritance
    • Transcription, translation and their control
    • Altering the genetic message
    • Gene technology
    • Exams

    Laboratory Topics
    • Computer usage for data collection and report writing
    • Experimental design and report writing
    • Microscopes and cell imaging
    • Enzymatic activity
    • Osmosis
    • Genetics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eryn L. Hassemer
  
  • BI 256 - Microbiology

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the basics of microbiology and its importance in health care. Concepts like microbial characteristics and pathogenesis, and general and specific immune reactions to bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are introduced. Epidemiology and infection control of the more common microbial diseases are covered. The laboratory includes hands on experience on topics emphasized by the lecture. (prereq: BI 1010 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the general characteristics, size and cellular organization of microorganisms
    • Know the elements of microbial nutrition, growth and metabolism and the environmental influences affecting growth and metabolism
    • Understand the host defense mechanisms important for fighting microbial infections
    • Understand how common microbial diseases are diagnosed
    • Understand the basics of microbial epidemiology and infection control
    • Know the major infectious diseases and their routes of infection
    • Know the laboratory steps and techniques routinely involved in specimen preparation, staining and in the culture of certain microorganisms
    • Understand how to do a proper literature review and library search for journal articles

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Cell biology, genetics and molecular biology

    Course Topics
    • Microbial world and microbial life (1 class)
    • Tools and techniques of microbiology (1 class)
    • Humans and microbes in health and disease (2 classes)
    • Host defense mechanisms in microbial infection (4 classes)
    • Diagnosis of infectious disease (2 classes)
    • Epidemiology and infection control (2 classes)
    • Infectious diseases acquired through inhalation (5 classes)
    • Infectious diseases acquired through ingestion (5 classes)
    • Infectious diseases acquired through skin and mucosa or parenterally (5 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Safety procedures and microscope use (1 session)
    • Simple and differential stains (1 session)
    • Researching your paper topic (1 session)
    • Classifying bacteria by enzymes and staining (1 session)
    • Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (1 session)
    • Blood cells and blood typing (1 session)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Gul Afshan
  
  • BI 499 - Life Science Independent Study

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students enrolled in this course are afforded the opportunity to pursue a specialized topic in their chosen field of study. After an approved area of study has been selected, weekly meetings with the course adviser are required. A final written report, the format of which is left to the discretion of the adviser, is required at the end of the term. (prereq: senior standing and consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Broaden his/her scientific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Vary by student interest

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • BI 1001 - Principles of Biomedical Sciences

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes, and bio-informatics. Key biological concepts including homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including the design process, feedback loops, and the relationship of structure to function are also incorporated. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences Program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students enrolled at a Project Lead The Way (PLTW) school. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Elizabeth Taylor
  
  • BI 1002 - Human Body Systems

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real-world cases, and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students enrolled at a Project Lead The Way (PLTW) school. (prereq: BI 1001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Elizabeth Taylor
  
  • BI 1003 - Medical Interventions

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease as they follow the lives of a fictitious family. The course is a “how-to” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore how to prevent and fight infection; how to screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; how to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer; and how to prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. These scenarios expose students to the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Each family case scenario introduces multiple types of interventions and reinforces concepts learned in the previous two courses, as well as presenting new content. Interventions may range from simple diagnostic tests to treatment of complex diseases and disorders. These interventions are showcased across generations of a family and provide a look at the past, present, and future of the biomedical sciences. Lifestyle choices and preventive measures are emphasized throughout the course as are the important roles scientific thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students enrolled at a Project Lead The Way (PLTW) school. (prereq: BI 1002 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Elizabeth Taylor
  
  • BI 1010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first course of the 4-quarter anatomy and physiology course sequence. Topics include the chemistry of life, cellular form and function, genetics, histology, integumentary system, and bone tissue. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain how common biological atoms and molecules interact within living systems
    • List the 4 categories of biological macromolecules and provide example functions of each
    • Identify the common components of cells, and list the general functions of each
    • Compare and contrast the types of membrane transport processes (including the passive process of osmosis)
    • Describe the steps involved in gene expression and explain how gene expression can modify the functions of any particular cell
    • Identify the general mechanisms by which cells can generate ATP as an energy source
    • Outline the steps in mitosis and explain the conditions under which mitosis normally occurs
    • List the classes of body tissues and explain the histological features of each tissue
    • List the histological features of the integumentary system and explain how they contribute to the functions of the integumentary system
    • List the histological features of bone tissue and explain how these features contribute to the functions of the skeletal system

    Course Topics
    • Chemistry of life
    • Cellular form and function
    • Genetics and cellular function
    • Histology
    • Integumentary system
    • Bone tissue

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lisa Jurgens
  
  • BI 1010A - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first course of the 4-quarter anatomy and physiology course sequence. The course is designed for students that have not had high-school chemistry or biology (or both) or have had them more than two years ago. Topics include the chemistry of life, cellular form and function, genetics, histology, integumentary system, and bone tissue. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain how common biological atoms and molecules interact within living systems
    • List the 4 categories of biological macromolecules and provide example functions of each
    • Identify the common components of cells, and list the general functions of each
    • Compare and contrast the types of membrane transport processes (including the passive process of osmosis)
    • Describe the steps involved in gene expression and explain how gene expression can modify the functions of any particular cell
    • Identify the general mechanisms by which cells can generate ATP as an energy source
    • Outline the steps in mitosis and explain the conditions under which mitosis normally occurs
    • List the classes of body tissues and explain the histological features of each tissue
    • List the histological features of the integumentary system and explain how they contribute to the functions of the integumentary system
    • List the histological features of bone tissue and explain how these features contribute to the functions of the skeletal system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Chemistry of life
    • Cellular form and function
    • Genetics and cellular function
    • Histology
    • Integumentary system
    • Bone tissue

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lisa Jurgens
  
  • BI 1020 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the basic principles of functional human anatomy and physiology that apply to the skeletal system, joints, muscle tissue, the muscular system, nervous tissue, and components of the central and peripheral nervous system. (prereq: BI 1010 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply the terminology related to anatomical orientation, body regions and body cavities
    • Name and locate the major bones of the human body
    • Define the names of the important surface features of bones
    • Explain the classifications of joints and the standard features of synovial joints
    • Name and locate the major muscles of the human body
    • Apply the terminology used to name muscles
    • Explain the histological features and functions of nervous tissue
    • Name, locate and describe the function of the major features of the central and peripheral nervous systems
    • Describe the functions of the various nervous system structures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Chemistry of life
    • Cell structure and function
    • Genetics and cellular function
    • Histology and tissue characteristics

    Course Topics
    • General orientation to anatomy (2 classes)
    • Skeletal system and joints (6 classes)
    • Muscular tissue and muscular system (7 classes)
    • Nervous tissue and central and peripheral nervous systems (12 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lisa Jurgens
  
  • BI 1030 - Human Anatomy and Physiology III

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the basic principles of functional human anatomy and physiology that apply to homeostasis, the circulatory system and its control, immune system, and respiratory system. (prereq: BI 1020 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • List the blood constituents and explain their properties
    • Identify the the anatomical structures of the heart
    • Explain the functions of the heart and the mechanisms by which they are regulated
    • Describe the physical characteristics of blood vessels and explain how these contribute to their functions
    • Name and locate major arteries and veins
    • Describe the forces that regulate capillary exchange
    • Identify the structures of the lymphatic system and explain their functions
    • Name, locate and describe the function of the major structures of the respiratory system
    • Explain the function, control, and mechanics of respiration
    • Describe how oxygen is carried and the factors affecting the oxygen carrying capacity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Chemistry of life
    • Cell structure and function
    • Genetics and cellular function
    • Histology and tissue characteristics
    • Nervous system function

    Course Topics
    • Blood (3 classes)
    • Cardiac structure and function (5 classes)
    • Autonomic control of the cardiovascular system (2 classes)
    • Blood vessels and circulation (6 classes)
    • Lymphatic and immune systems (4 classes)
    • Respiratory System and transport of gases (7 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Control of cardiovascular function (4 sessions)
    • Heart rate and EKG (2 sessions)
    • Respiratory function (4 sessions)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lisa Jurgens
  
  • BI 2020 - Cellular Microbiology

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the basics of cellular microbiology and the increasing importance and applications of microorganisms in engineering. Diversity of the microbial world, controls of microbial growth and metabolism, microbial molecular biology, ecology, and engineered environmental systems are discussed. Feasibility of bioremediation strategies and appropriate engineering controls to prevent undesired microbial infestation and food and industrial microbiology are also discussed and practiced. Lab activities provide hands-on experience to emphasize lecture content. (prereq: BI 102 CH 223 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an understanding of food and environmental microbiology
    • Gain an understanding of the importance of bioremediation
    • Demonstrate the use of basic microbiology engineering terminology and techniques
    • Be familiar with the primary information on contemporary technological, social, ethical, and economic issues of microbiology in today’s world

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Chemical context of life and its environment
    • Structure and function of macromolecules
    • Cell structure, function, metabolism, and communication
    • Cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis
    • Genetics and inheritance
    • Transcription, translation and their control
    • Altering the genetic message
    • Gene technology
    • Structures, assembly, functions, and applications of proteins
    • Structures and functions of enzymes
    • Structures, functions, and applications of nucleic acids
    • Genetics code, translation, and gene expression
    • Structures and functions of carbohydrates and their role in metabolism
    • Lipids, steroids, and hormones
    • Biochemistry leading to biotechnology

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and history
    • Microbial structure
    • Microbial growth
    • Microbial genetics
    • Viruses
    • Microbial mathematics
    • Food microbiology
    • Water and sewage treatment
    • Environmental microbiology
    • Bioremediation
    • Future challenges
    • Student presentations
    • Exams

    Laboratory Topics
    • Investigating the environment and gram staining
    • Environment and microbes
    • Food and environmental microbiology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eryn L. Hassemer
  
  • BI 2040 - Human Anatomy and Physiology IV

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the basic principles of functional human anatomy and physiology that apply to the endocrine system, the urinary system, water and electrolyte balance, the digestive system, the reproductive systems, and human development. (prereq: BI 1030 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Name, locate and describe the functions of the major features of the endocrine system
    • Sketch the homeostatic feedback loops involving the major hormones
    • Name, locate and describe the function of the major features of the urinary system
    • Describe the process and regulation of urine formation
    • Describe the feedback mechanisms used to maintain water balance
    • Describe the control mechanisms for regulation of electrolytes and the importance of the regulation
    • Describe the regulation of pH in terms of systems, mechanisms and time courses
    • Name, locate and describe the function of the major structures of the GI system
    • Name, locate and describe the major features of the male and female reproductive systems
    • Graph the phases of the menstrual cycle over time
    • Describe the time course of fetal development
    • Describe the placental and fetal circulations
    • Describe the changes in organ systems associated with senescence

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Chemistry of life
    • Cell structure and function
    • Genetics and cellular function
    • Histology and tissue characteristics
    • Nervous system function
    • Cardiovascular system function

    Course Topics
    • Endocrine system (4 classes)
    • Urinary system (6 classes)
    • Water, electrolyte and acid-base balance (3 classes)
    • Digestive system (4 classes)
    • Male and female reproductive systems (5 classes)
    • Development (3 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Urinary function (1 session)
    • Urinalysis (2 sessions)
    • Fluid end electrolyte control (2 sessions)
    • Reproductive function (2 sessions)
    • Digestive function (2 sessions)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Lisa Jurgens
  
  • BI 2305 - Physiology I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the concepts of human physiology that are most pertinent to the field of biomedical engineering. Concepts from the following topics will be covered: homeostasis, cell membrane potentials and transport mechanisms, nerve and muscle, and heart and the circulatory system. (prereq: BI 102 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the concept of homeostasis, including an ability to describe the components of a negative feedback loop
    • Describe the types of channels, transporters and exchangers that are used to move molecules across membranes
    • Explain the importance of membrane potentials, write the electrical analog equation for calculating membrane voltage and use this equation to predict changes in membrane voltage when provided with changes to ion concentrations or membrane conductance
    • Explain how cells communicate using electrical and chemical transmission techniques
    • Describe the general organization of the nervous system, including the ANS and its divisions
    • Identify the main functions of select brain regions
    • Explain the role of the nervous system in homeostatic feedback loops
    • Discuss the ways that information can be coded within neural circuits
    • Compare and contrast skeletal and smooth muscle function and regulation
    • Explain/analyze the length-tension curves of muscles
    • Describe the anatomical features of the cardiovascular system and explain how these features correlate with function
    • Use PV loops to describe and analyze cardiac function
    • Use feedback loops to describe the regulation of blood pressure and blood flow
    • Interpret a standard ECG tracing

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Cell biology and genetics

    Course Topics
    • Functional organization of the human body (1 class)
    • Homeostasis, the cell and its function (1 class)
    • Diffusion, osmosis and ion transport (2 classes)
    • Membrane and action potentials (3 classes)
    • Nervous system (4 classes)
    • Skeletal muscle contraction and excitation (4 classes)
    • Smooth muscle contraction and excitation (1 classes)
    • Heart muscle and function (3 classes)
    • EKG and cardiac abnormalities (2 classes)
    • Circulation and hemodynamics (5 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald Gerrits
  
  • BI 2306 - Human Physiology I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the concepts of human physiology that are most pertinent to the field of biomedical engineering. Concepts from the following topics will be covered: homeostasis, cell membrane potentials and transport mechanisms, nerve and muscle, and the heart and the circulatory system. (prereq:  BI 102 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the concept of homeostasis, including an ability to describe the components of a negative feedback loop
    • Describe the types of channels, transporters, and exchangers that are used to move molecules across membranes
    • Explain the importance of membrane potentials, write the electrical analog equation for calculating membrane voltage, and use this equation to predict changes in membrane voltage when provided with changes to ion concentrations or membrane conductance
    • Explain how cells communicate using electrical and chemical transmission techniques
    • Describe the general organization of the nervous system, including the ANS and its divisions
    • Identify the main functions of select brain regions
    • Explain the role of the nervous system in homeostatic feedback loops
    • Discuss the ways that information can be coded within neural circuits
    • Compare and contrast skeletal and smooth muscle function and regulation
    • Explain/analyze the length-tension curves of muscles
    • Describe the anatomical features of the cardiovascular system and explain how these features correlate with function
    • Describe the relationships among pressure, volume, flow, and resistance
    • Use PV loops to describe and analyze cardiac function
    • Use feedback loops to describe the regulation of blood pressure and blood flow
    • Interpret a standard ECG tracing

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Cell biology
    • Genetics
    • Introductory chemistry

    Course Topics
    • Functional organization of the human body (1 class)
    • Homeostasis, the cell and its function (1 class)
    • Membrane structure and function (1 class)
    • Diffusion, osmosis, and ion transport (3 classes)
    • Osmolarity and tonicity (1 class)
    • Membrane and action potentials (3 classes)
    • Nervous system (7 classes)
    • Skeletal muscle contraction and excitation (5 classes)
    • Smooth muscle contraction and excitation (1 classes)
    • Heart muscle and function (3 classes)
    • Pressure, volume, flow, and resistance relationships (1 class)
    • EKG and cardiac abnormalities (2 classes)
    • Circulation and hemodynamics (5 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald Gerrits
  
  • BI 2315 - Physiology II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the concepts of human physiology that are most pertinent to the field of biomedical engineering. Concepts from the following topics will be covered: the heart and circulatory system, blood, lymphatics and immunity, respiratory system, urinary system, and endocrine system. (prereq: BI 2305 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the anatomical features of the cardiovascular system and explain how these features correlate with function
    • Use PV loops to describe and analyze cardiac function
    • Use feedback loops to describe the regulation of blood pressure and blood flow
    • Interpret a standard ECG tracing
    • Describe the components of blood and their functions
    • Explain the structure and function of the respiratory system. Predict the operation and control of the respiratory system
    • Explain how oxygen is delivered to the blood, carried in the blood, and delivered to the tissues
    • Describe how carbon dioxide is carried in the blood and removed by the lung
    • Describe how plasma carbon dioxide relates to pH
    • Describe the structures and explain the functions of the renal system
    • Calculate clearance, renal plasma flow and fractional excretion
    • Describe the control of filtration and re-absorption within the renal system
    • Describe the role of the kidney in fluid and electrolyte balance
    • Apply knowledge of acid-base balance to problems involving gas transport
    • Describe the feedback loops in which specified hormones are involved
    • Describe the organization, function, operation, and control of selected topic of the endocrine system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Physiology I

    Course Topics
    • Cardiac and circulatory systems
    • Lymphatics
    • Blood
    • Mechanics of breathing
    • Gas exchange and transport
    • Regulation of ventilation
    • The kidneys
    • Fluid, electrolyte balance and acid base
    • Endocrine control of growth and metabolism
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald Gerrits
  
  • BI 2316 - Human Physiology II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to present the concepts of human physiology that are most pertinent to the field of biomedical engineering. Concepts from the following topics will be covered: blood, lymphatics and immunity, respiratory system, urinary system, endocrine system, and energy balance. (prereq: BI 2306 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the components of blood and their functions
    • Describe the regulation and production of blood cells
    • Explain the processes of hemostasis and coagulation
    • Explain the structure and function of the respiratory system
    • Predict the operation and control of the respiratory system
    • Explain how oxygen is delivered to the blood, carried in the blood, and delivered to the tissues
    • Describe how carbon dioxide is carried in the blood and removed by the lung
    • Describe how plasma carbon dioxide relates to pH
    • Describe the structures and explain the functions of the renal system
    • Calculate clearance, renal plasma flow, and fractional excretion
    • Describe the control of filtration and re-absorption within the renal system
    • Describe the role of the kidney in fluid and electrolyte balance
    • Apply knowledge of acid-base balance to problems involving gas transport
    • Describe the feedback loops in which specified hormones are involved
    • Describe energy balance, including the factors that determine energy intake and expenditures
    • Describe the organization, function, operation, and control of the selected endocrine system
    • Describe the functions of the endocrine pancreas and their role in regulating plasma glucose

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Human Physiology I

    Course Topics
    • Lymphatics (1 class)
    • Blood components and their regulation/production (4 classes)
    • Hemostasis (1 class)
    • Mechanics of breathing (ventilation) (4 classes)
    • Gas exchange and transport (4 classes)
    • Regulation of ventilation (2 classes)
    • The kidneys (5 classes)
    • Fluid, electrolyte balance and acid base (5 classes)
    • Metabolism and energy balance (4 classes)
    • Insulin/glucagon; regulation of blood glucose (2 classes)
    • Endocrine control of growth and metabolism (5 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald Gerrits
  
  • BI 3100 - Stem Cell and Cancer Biology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers a broad range of topics relevant to stem cell biology. This field brings together many aspects of basic and applied biology and medicine including development, regeneration/repair, and cancer. The course covers: pluripotency and reprogramming, pluripotent cell types, organ systems, stem cells and cancer, therapeutics and ethics. The lecture/discussion format gives students both a broad background and the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills to recent data in the field. The course also surveys the categories of tumors and their varying natures. Known mechanisms that lead to tumor cell development, multistep tumorigenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, and cancer treatments will be examined in depth. (prereq: BI 102  or BI 1010  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand pluripotency and cell reprogramming
    • Understand the different cell types
    • Understand organ systems
    • Understand the relationship between stem cells and cancer
    • Understand the different types of cancer therapeutics
    • Understand the ethics behind stem cells
    • Understand the ethics behind cancer
    • Understand the different categories of tumors
    • Understand tumor cell development
    • Apply critical thinking skills in the stem cell field
    • Apply critical thinking skills in the cancer biology field

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • General structure and chemical properties of atoms and molecules.
    • Structure and functional properties of the macromolecules found in living matter
    • Structural components of mammalian cells and explain their function
    • Types of transport processes occurring across the cell membranes and the energy sources for them
    • Mechanisms of intercellular communication
    • Enzymes’ structural domains important for the chemical kinetics
    • Mechanisms of energy storage, transfer, release, and use in cellular processes
    • The processes of mitosis and meiosis and conditions under which they occur.
    • Genetic terms and solving traditional genetic problems
    • The processes of transcription and translation, including their regulation, and discuss their effect on the cell function.
    • How changes in genetic material can occur.
    • The major techniques involved in gene technology and describe specific uses of each technique.
    • Designing and performing a scientific experiment, including hypothesis generation and testing
    • Using statistical tests to interpret laboratory data.
    • Standardized scientific report writing format

    Course Topics
    • Isolation and characteristics of human embryonic stem cells and future applications in tissue engineering therapies
    • Epigenetics, stem cell pluripotency, and differentiation
    • Stem cell pluripotency and differentiation
    • Haematopoietic stem cells in therapy
    • Isolation and Identification of neural stem/progenitor cells
    • The role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer metastasis
    • Regulation of breast cancer stem cells by mesenchymal stem cells in the metastatic niche
    • Isolation and identification of neural cancer stem/progenitor cells
    • Colon stem cells in colorectal cancer
    • Prostate cancer and prostate cancer stem cells
    • Stem cells and pancreatic cancer
    • NANOG in cancer development
    • Liver cancer stem cells and hepatocarcinogenesis
    • Cancer stem cell biomarkers
    • Interactomic analysis of stem cell marker NANOG in prostate cancer setting

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eryn Hassemer
  
  • BI 3350 - Introduction to Genomics: Concepts and Technologies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares the student to apply knowledge of genomics and genetics in their biology, science, or clinical-based professions. The course prepares the student to participate in healthcare or related workforce areas in delivering competent genetic and genomic focused skills. The course develops students’ technical knowledge and theory of diagnostic skills needed to address the genetics- and genomics-related issues and concerns for clients and their families. This course will be accepted as an NU elective for students in the School of Nursing. (prereq: BI 102  or equivalent; BI 1010  or equivalent; NU 290  or equivalent or by consent of the instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand genomics and its role in the health practices
    • Understand the role genomics play in the diagnosis, prognosis, and predictive medicine in terms of diseases
    • Understand the genomics and epigenomics relationship
    • Understand the importance for adapting genetic/genomic information and services to clients based on culture, religion, knowledge level, literacy, and preferred language.
    • Apply critical thinking by recognizing the relationship of genetics/genomics to health, prevention, screening, diagnostics, treatment, and treatment effectiveness
    • Analyze genetic/genomic based interventions and information to improve client outcomes
    • Determine the importance for collaborating with members of the healthcare team to improve healthcare outcomes for clients with genetic/genomic concerns
    • Establish effective communication and health education skills to improve care of the client with genetic/genomic concerns
    • Compare technology used in the diagnosis and treatment of genetic/genomic concerns
    • Justify the role of the health care professional in advocating for the client with genetic/genomic concerns

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Study of genomics
    • Difference between unicellular and multicellular genomes
    • Difference between genetics, genomics, proteomics
    • Global impact of genomics
    • Ethics in genomics and genomic practice
    • Genetics/genomics basis for inheritable diseases
    • Genomics influence on selected complex health problems
    • Genomics and disease management
    • Global genomics issues

    Coordinator
    Drs. Gul Afshan and Renee Wenzlaff

Business Administration

  
  • BA 1000 - Business Foundations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This introductory business class acts as a survey of foundational business topics and introduces students to the many core concepts needed to pursue their chosen business program. Topics include economics, accounting, finance, management, marketing, and human resources, where classroom lectures and discussions will prepare students pursuing a business degree. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Assess current ethical, economic, and global issues in business, including knowledge on the difference between ethics and corporate social responsibility, major world marketplaces, trade agreements and their collective impacts on business
    • Understand the basic marketing concepts and the decisions made by marketers, such as the different ways to price or promote a product
    • Describe basic human resources practices including hiring, developing, engaging, managing and retaining employees in a corporation
    • Develop a basic understanding of business accounting and finance principles, like the components of a balance sheet cash flow and income statement and how each are used in business
    • Demonstrate an understanding of management practices and how companies define quality and flexibility to meet customer and market trends

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 1015 - Business Performance Analysis

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers key business terminology regarding analysis across all business functions. Students will work with different types of data and various sources of data to build their analytic skills using excel to improve business processes and decision making. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify different types of data used in business analysis across business functions
    • Develop excel skills to perform basic data preparation and business analysis
    • Utilize business analysis techniques to drive data-driven decision-making to improve business performance
    • Understand the ethics of managing business data

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
  
  • BA 1220 - Microeconomics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the central concepts of microeconomic analysis and decision making, such as demand and supply, elasticity, and marginalism. The concepts are then used to explain and analyze market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly. Other topics may include analysis of labor markets, property rights, and international economics. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding, usage and application of basic economic principles
    • Describe and apply the methods for analyzing consumer behavior through demand and supply, elasticity and marginal utility
    • Understand the role of alternative property rights in resource allocation
    • Identify and appraise various models of how markets are organized, and the price and output decisions for maximizing profit
    • Know how markets that fail to use resources efficiently create unintended effects
    • Strengthen problem solving skills by applying economic criteria to business decisions, international trade and public policy

    Course Topics
    • Foundation of economic thinking, opportunity cost, production possibilities, and property rights (4 classes)
    • Supply and demand, price ceilings and floors (4 classes)
    • Elasticity, marginal utility, and consumer choice (5 classes)
    • Production costs and the profit-maximizing decision (4 classes)
    • Decision making under different market structures (4 classes)
    • Externalities, market failure, and public choice (3 classes)
    • International trade (3 classes)
    • Discretionary topics: factor markets, income distribution, taxes, government spending, etc. (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Paul Hudec
  
  • BA 1227 - Global Business

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to develop an understanding of the expanding need for businesses to think and respond with an international focus. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the forces of globalization, the factors to consider when moving into new markets, and the methods by which firms decide to compete in these foreign markets. Attention is given to developing an analysis and appreciation of at least one country/region of the world with regard to its geography, people, history and the associated business risks within this environment. Sensitivity to other cultures is expanded, while students are encouraged to think of their career in the context of a global path.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend and apply the monetary system, fiscal policies, government interventions, and currency conversion strategies and how they influence corporations’ profits and costs
    • Review current international trade alliances including a review of their rules, government dynamics, imports/exports and their tariffs, international sanctions, and governing abuses
    • Explain how international factors (political, legal, economic, sovereignty, cultural, etc.) influence domestic business concerns
    • Identify factors to consider when entering into a new market, region, or country that align with overall company business strategy

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 1700 - Programming Concepts

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will learn foundational concepts within programming.  Concepts such as Boolean logic and data stuctures will be introduced, as well as constructs such conditional and iterative control structures. Students will demonstrate competency in these fundamentals by designing simple programs. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Create and evaluate Boolean expressions
    • Compare and constrast types of data structures
    • Choose an appropriate data structure given a problem statement
    • Analyze and explain the behavior of simple programs involving conditional and iterative control structures
    • Design simple programs using data structures and appropriate control constructs

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 1710 - Introduction to Computer Programming

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to computer programming and the approaches and methods used by programmers. The course provides opportunity for experience in designing and writing structured programs in the Visual Basic language. This graphically based programming language will prepare students to write fundamental interactive computer programs. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeff Blessing
  
  • BA 1764 - Advanced Java Programming

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This, the third course in the Java programming sequence, introduces topics that are the basis for building robust, reliable systems in Java. Topics covered include data structures and the collections API, streams and files, multithreading, networking, and database connectivity. (prereq: BA 2732 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Instill in the student the basic elements of client-side Java programming skills and be introduced to server-side Java technologies (i.e. Enterprise Java)

    Course Topics
    • Component graphics, part I
    • Exception handling and assertions
    • Strings, character arrays and regular expressions
    • Streams, files and object serialization
    • Collections
    • Generics
    • Custom generic data structures
    • Databases and JDBC
    • Multi-threading
    • Networks (client-side applications)
    • GUI components, part II
    • Web applications

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeff Blessing
  
  • BA 1801 - Business Technology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, the challenges of managing information in a business context is explored with an emphasis on learning the basics of fundamental technology components and key business systems.  Information management challenges, such as ethics and security concerns, are explored.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the role of information technology in business strategy and innovation
    • Identify and define key ethical and security concepts within information technology
    • Identify and describe the key components within information technology systems
    • Understand the role and function of key business systems such as ERP, CRM, HRIS and supply chain
    • Explore the use of social media and collaborative software applications in business

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 2015 - Business Analytics I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the field of business analytics including using analysis to support data driven decision making to improve business performance. Through the application of a standard analysis process, students will gain hands-on experience applying exploratory data analysis and statistical techniques to business case studies.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify data sources and acquisition, evaluation, and preparation methods for analytic processing of data
    • Identify and describe the standard steps taken to analyze data for a decision-making scenario
    • Apply statistical and quantitative analysis techniques and tools to a given decision-making scenario
    • Demonstrate application of ethical principles in analyzing business scenarios for decision making

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Beth Slayman
  
  • BA 2220 - Foundations of Business Economics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents fundamental concepts of economics and expects a student will demonstrate understanding of the interactive nature of global, national and local economic systems. The course explores how individuals, households, businesses and governments use scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants and needs. Emphasis is placed on how economics serves as the basis for business decisions. Students required to take BA 1220  Microeconomics or BA 2222  Macroeconomics are not eligible to earn credit toward their major for BA 2220. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop problem solving skills by applying economic criteria to engineering design, business decisions, international trade and public policy
    • Describe the structure of the Federal Reserve System and its tools for controlling the money supply in a fractional reserve banking system
    • Demonstrate an understanding of fiscal and monetary policy and how policy changes can potentially affect the economy
    • Develop analytical skills necessary for determination of the worth of systems, products and services in relation to cost
    • Determine economic feasibility when evaluating alternatives
    • Describe and apply the methods for analyzing consumer behavior through demand and supply, elasticity and marginal utility
    • Identify and appraise various models of how markets are organized, and the price and output decisions for maximizing profit

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Paul Hudec
  
  • BA 2222 - Macroeconomics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Macroeconomics outlines and analyzes the application of the principles and theories of economics to modern business and the economic environment. Topics include measuring and understanding GDP, unemployment and business cycles, national debt and the role of government as expressed in macroeconomic theory. Monetary and fiscal policy efforts to promote employment, trade agreements economic impacts, price stability and economic growth are reviewed. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand different market types including components of aggregate supply & demand, government interventions, and business and consumer response to markets
    • Describe how different economic indicators influence the economy of a country, industries, other indicators, forecasting, and consumers’ and businesses’ behaviors
    • Analyze and compare a country’s entire economic picture including GDP, income inequality, economic freedom, growth and instability, and employment levels
    • Comprehend fiscal and monetary policies, who controls them and how they influence industries and countries

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Macro vs micro discussion, Intro to macro mindframe, market systems.
    • Market failures, role of government
    • Income inequality, poverty, GDP
    • Growth and stability, economic indicators (leading, lagging, coincident)
    • Aggregate supply and demand
    • Business cycles, unemployment, inflation
    • Fiscal policy, deficits, debt
    • Monetary policy, money, banking, interest rates
    • Trade agreements and unions
    • Case study of housing crash and recession 
    • How industries all fit together

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 2225 - Healthcare Economics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces concepts of economics and financial management for healthcare professionals. Course topics include principles of economics, fundamentals of managed care and health reform, budgets and budget preparation, financial analysis, preparation of business plans, global health care models, and future trends. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain how economic principles apply to the healthcare market and the provision of health care services
    • Analyze the impact of managed care on cost, quality, and access within managed care organizations and the health insurance market
    • Review, analyze, and prepare a budget for a nurse’s work setting
    • Understand the purposes of cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and break-even analysis
    • Review and analyze basic financial reports used by health care organizations.
    • Identify current economic and financing trends that influence the cost, quality, and access of care

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Overview of healthcare economics and financing
    • Health insurance and reimbursement
    • Managed care and accountable care organizations
    • Nursing care measurements
    • Budget planning and management
    • Financial analysis
    • Financial health
    • Health policy and ethics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Debra Jenks
  
  • BA 2331 - Business Law

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject acquaints the student with legal concepts and their application to business and personal situations. Attention is paid to problems arising under the following topical headings: basic nature of the legal system; tort law; contract law, including both common law principles and the provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code; products liability law; debtor/creditor relations; bankruptcy law; and agency law. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic nature of the legal system including the court structure and the role of lawyers
    • Understand the different types of torts and crimes
    • Be familiar with contract law including all the elements of contract law
    • Understand the basic theories of product liability law
    • Understand the basic theories of employment law
    • Understand the basics of intellectual property law

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    John Osmanski, J.D.
  
  • BA 2401 - Project Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to expose students to the realities of project management through lecture, discussion, and participation in a project meeting. It addresses the topics of people in projects, project teams, and management styles, as well as the tools used to plan, track, and control the outcome such as budgets, Gantt charts, work break down structures, critical path management, and project wrap-ups.
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate understanding of project management terminology
    • Describe the link between projects and strategic planning
    • Demonstrate proficiency in standard project management practices and techniques
    • Demonstrate an ability to create and lead project teams
    • Demonstrate an ability to apply the latest concepts, tools, and techniques in managing and executing a successful project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Thomas Eberle
  
  • BA 2440 - Production Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Production Management introduces the student to the concepts and methods for designing and managing operations in both manufacturing and service industries. Operations are processes that transform inputs into outputs of goods and services. Operations Management addresses the application of resources needed to achieve transformation with regard to cost, quality, and customer satisfaction.  (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the essential principles of operations and production, and be able to communicate those principles to others
    • Describe the issues related to planning, organizing, and managing the resources used to create and deliver products and services
    • Explain the approaches used to control and schedule productive resources
    • Describe basic production processes
    • Describe the strategic importance of operations and explain how operation can provide a competitive advantage in the marketplace
    • Describe the relationship between operations and other business functions, such as marketing, finance, accounting, and human resources

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 2442 - Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is a survey course on the management processes of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The course begins with a comparison of the current spectrum of management philosophies. Social responsibility and ethical decision-making are normally covered through case studies, while the emerging interest in international and cross-cultural managing is interwoven throughout the course. Traditional functions of management such as strategic planning and organizational design are given special emphasis to stimulate discussion on how organizations adapt to global conditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of basic terminology and concepts for business managers
    • Be able to apply ethical and socially responsible guidelines to dilemmas facing professional managers
    • Identify and appraise the evolution of management and leadership theories
    • Demonstrate an understanding of strategic planning, the use of planning tools, and the manager’s role in decision-making and organizational design
    • Understand communication techniques, tools, and potential issues for managing in today’s global setting
    • Describe and apply the techniques of a managerial control system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katrina Moskalik
  
  • BA 2501 - Finance I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of finance. The role of finance is explored with emphasis on financial statement preparation, transaction processing, financial statement analysis and working capital management to enhance management decision making, and the implications of ethical and social issues. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the role of finance in business strategy and innovation
    • Create and analyze financial statements
    • Identify and demonstrate how transactions affect the financial statements for service, merchandising and manufacturing companies
    • Identify and implement working capital management tools
    • Identify and implement fixed asset financial management tools

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2503 - Finance II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues with the fundamental concepts of finance introduced in Finance I. The focus of this course is short term financial management including profit planning, leverage analysis, short term financing decisions, cash cycle, and time value of money. (prereq: BA 2501 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the cash cycle and its use in financial decision making.
    • Apply time value of money concepts to decision making.
    • Describe and calculate operating and financial leverage.
    • Create and analyze profit planning tools, cost volume profit analysis, and performance analysis.
    • Apply interest rate analysis to short term financing decisions.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • BA 2501 needed for foundational concepts for this course.

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2505 - Finance III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues with the fundamental concepts of finance from Finance II.  The focus of this course is long term financial management including capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, relevant costs, and investments. (prereq: BA 2503 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and calculate acceptance criteria and projected cash flows in a capital budgeting decision
    • Describe the capital structure decision and calculate the cost of capital
    • Describe and calculate the value of investments
    • Calculate and analyze the relevant costs in strategic decisions
    • Identify the financial concerns for a decentralized organization

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • BA 2503 concepts needed to understand concepts in this course

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2510 - Introduction to Accounting

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Introduction to Accounting involves the examination of generally accepted accounting principles for measurement, reporting, and analysis of financial information. Emphasizes use of financial statements by non-accountants and provides a general understanding of basic accounting principles and processes. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the role of accounting in business strategy and innovation.
    • Create and analyze all four financial statements for all types of companies including service, merchandising, and manufacturing.
    • Identify and demonstrate how transactions affect the financial statements for service, merchandising, and manufacturing companies.
    • Identify and implement accounting processes for receivables, inventory and fixed assets.
    • Identify cost behavior and implement cost-volume-profit analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to accounting including the financial statements
    • Balance sheet
    • Income statement
    • Statement of retained earnings and cash flow statement
    • Transaction processing,
    • Accrual accounting
    • Classified balance sheet and multi-step income statement
    • Inventory
    • Receivables
    • Fixed assets
    • Cost accounting basics for a manufacturing company
    • Contribution margin income statement and cost-volume-profit analysis
    • Cash flow statement

    Laboratory Topics
    • Demonstrate the flow of transactions through the accounting system.
    • Explain debits and credits
    • Prepare journal entries, t-accounts and trial balance
    • Demonstrate the difference between cash basis and accrual basis accounting
    • Prepare adjusting entries
    • Demonstrate the closing process
    • Create a classified balance sheet
    • Demonstrate the accounting processes for a merchandising company
    • Create a multi-step income statement
    • Demonstrate how merchandise inventory cost are determined under perpetual inventory systems and different costing methods
    • Explain how valuation methods affect the financial statements
    • Explain lower or cost or market is implemented
    • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of allowing trade credit
    • Demonstrate the adjustment process for bad debts
    • Describe fixed assets
    • Demonstrate depreciation methods and how they affect the financial statements
    • Demonstrate the accounting for the disposal of fixed assets
    • Explain the differences in accounting between service business, merchandise business and manufacturing.
    • Identify components of the cost of goods manufactured.
    • Describe product vs period costs
    • Identify variable and fixed costs
    • Demonstrate a contribution margin income statement
    • Explain and demonstrate the uses of cost volume profit analysis
    • Create a statement of cash flows
    • Describe and calculate free cash flow

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2530 - Introduction to Finance

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the fundamental concepts of finance. The focus of this course is short-term financial management and financial statement analysis including ratio analysis, profit planning, leverage analysis, short-term financing decisions, cash cycle, and time value of money.  A term-long project preparing a financial analysis of a corporation will solidify the course concepts.  (prereq: BA 2510 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Create, understand, and interpret common-size financial statements, financial ratios, and benchmarking
    • Describe the cash cycle and its use in financial decision making
    • Apply time value of money concepts to decision making
    • Create and analyze profit planning tools, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, and performance analysis
    • Understand components of working capital management
    • Apply interest rate analysis to short-term financing decisions and bonds

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction of finance and review of accounting
    • Time value of money
    • Interest rates
    • Ratio analysis
    • Financial planning
    • Working capital management
    • Bonds valuation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Demonstrate the time value of money across different points in time
    • Describe loan payment methods
    • Demonstrate annuities
    • Identify the determinants of interest rates and how they are quoted and adjusted
    • Demonstrate discount rates and loan calculations
    • Create common size statements
    • Describe and calculate financial ratios
    • Demonstrate how to analyze the ratios
    • Describe Dupont equation
    • Describe the budgeting process
    • Demonstrate a master budget
    • Describe management by exception
    • Demonstrate a flexible budget
    • Demonstrate forecasting short term financial needs calculations
    • Identify the asset funding matching principle
    • Demonstrate the percentage of sales method
    • Describe and demonstrate free cash flows
    • Describe the cash conversions cycle
    • Demonstrate management of accounts receivable and inventory
    • Demonstrate the effects of cash discounts
    • Identify the asset funding matching principle
    • Describe the fundamental bond concepts
    • Determine bond prices and yields
    • Identify bond features and ratings

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2550 - Corporate Finance

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues with the fundamental concepts of finance and accounting. The focus of this course is long-term financial management including capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, relevant costs, and investments.  The term project will solidify the capital budgeting concepts.  (prereq: BA 2510  and BA 2530 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and calculate acceptance criteria and projected cash flows in a capital budgeting decision
    • Describe the capital structure decision and calculate the cost of capital
    • Describe and calculate the value of investments
    • Calculate and analyze the relevant costs in strategic decisions
    • Identify the financial concerns for a decentralized organization

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Review of accounting and finance
    • Investment decision rules
    • Fundamentals of capital budgeting
    • Valuing stocks
    • Estimating cost of capital
    • Capital budgeting and valuation with leverage
    • Raising equity capital
    • Debt financing
    • Leasing

    Laboratory Topics
    • Describe corporations and financial markets
    • Review financial statements
    • Review time value of money
    • Review bonds
    • Describe the price of risk
    • Demonstrate NPV, IRR, and payback methods for valuing projects
    • Describe project selection criteria
    • Identify the effects of financial constraints
    • Create earnings forecasts
    • Examine the components of free cash flows
    • Evaluate projects using sensitivity analysis and scenario analysis
    • Describe the effects of MACRS depreciation
    • Demonstrate the dividend discount model
    • Describe valuations based on free cash flow models
    • Identify comparable firms’ models
    • Determine the components of cost of capital
    • Identify the project cost of capital and risk adjustments
    • Demonstrate how leverage effects capital budgeting
    • Examine the effects of corporate tax on capital budgeting decisions
    • Identify the effects of periodically adjusted leverage policies
    • Examine equity financing for private companies
    • Identify the key elements of an initial public offering (IPO)
    • Describe seasoned equity offerings
    • Describe types of debt
    • Identify common bond covenants and repayment provisions
    • Explain leasing concepts
    • Identify reasons for leasing
    • Describe the accounting, tax and legal consequences of leasing

    Coordinator
    Carol Mannino
  
  • BA 2661 - Marketing

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to foundational marketing concepts. Topics include the evolution of marketing, the significance and use of marketing research, marketing segmentation, product and/or service positioning, distribution, pricing, customer relationship management, and a variety of strategies for marketing communication and promotion while exercising ethical business practices. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the significance of marketing information systems and marketing research to organizations and the marketing planning process
    • Understand the process of strategic planning and how to integrate marketing into an organization’s strategic plan
    • Understand the global nature of marketing and business, the rapidly changing technology of today’s marketing and business environment
    • Recognize the impact of the growing demographic diversity and the importance of ethics in conducting business in the modern business environment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Understanding marketing and the marketing process
    • Analyze marketing opportunities
    • Selecting target markets
    • Developing the marketing mix
    • Managing the marketing effort
    • Extending marketing

    Laboratory Topics
    • Classroom assignments – work with “real world” marketing professional on final marketing project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Payne
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 -> 12