Apr 17, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Mechanical Engineering

  
  • ME 491 - Senior Design II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of ME 490 . Students are required to complete or show sufficient progress on an engineering design project proposed in ME 490 . Design work is performed by design teams under the supervision of a faculty advisor. A final or interim design report is prepared and orally defended. Lecture meetings are used for discussion of topics related to professionalism and engineering careers and oral presentation of design efforts by each team. (prereq: ME 490 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have designed a mechanical or thermal system in a team setting
    • Have prepared a formal design report
    • Have made an oral presentation of design efforts to the class
    • Have made an oral presentation in defense of his or her design work

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Organizational meeting
    • Report writing
    • Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing
    • Other topics
    • Design group presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Mohammad Mahinfalah
  
  • ME 492 - Senior Design III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of ME 491 . Students are to create a prototype of the engineering design project proposed in ME 490  and initiated in ME 491 . Design work is performed by design teams under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The design report is updated, and a final design poster is prepared and defended. (prereq: ME 491 , consent of project faculty advisor and ME 492 instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have designed a mechanical or thermal system in a team setting
    • Have prepared a formal design report
    • Have made a poster presentation in defense of his or her design work

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Organizational meeting
    • Supervised design and prototyping work

    Coordinator
    Dr. Mohammad Mahinfalah
  
  • ME 498 - Topics in Mechanical Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in mechanical engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: see advisor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have studied an engineering topic of special interest

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Damm
  
  • ME 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This selection allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature survey, analysis, design or laboratory study. (prereq: consent of faculty advisor and program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have studied an engineering topic of special interest

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • To be determined by the faculty supervisor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Damm
  
  • ME 1301 - Introduction to Mechatronics

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to apply programming and algorithm development methods to acquire sensor measurements and to the control of hardware.  Applications in data acquisition, robotics, and mechatronics will be emphasized. (prereq: ME 190 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply concepts of structured programming in the control of hardware
    • Implement computer-based data acquisition to acquire sensor measurements
    • Design a basic embedded system to meet a desired set of needs
    • Write technical documentation recording engineering activities

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Programming

    Course Topics
    • Programming with the Arduino Microcontroller
    • Digital I/O
    • Analog I/O, A/D and D/A conversion
    • Linear calibration and Servo Motor Control
    • Control of stepper motors
    • Introduction to robotics
    • Design projects

    Laboratory Topics
    • Discrete I/O: switches and LEDS
    • Analog I/O: DC Motors, solar cells, temperature sensors, infrared sensors, and potentiometers
    • Control of a stepper motor: coordinated control of a two-axis positioning system
    • Introduction to C programming concepts
    • Deploying an embedded solution with the Arduino microcontroller
    • Introduction to robotics: coordinated control of a multi-axis robotic arm
    • Student design projects

    Coordinator
    Dr. Luis A. Rodriguez
  
  • ME 1601 - Introduction to Solid Modeling and Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is intended to introduce the student to Computer Aided Design (CAD) and the formal engineering design process. Topics focus on the engineering design process, solid modeling tools, and the application of solid modeling in mechanical engineering design. The course includes a team design project. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand a formal design process as used in mechanical engineering
    • Generate 2-D engineering drawings
    • Generate solid models of parts and assemblies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Sketching
    • Part modeling
    • 2-D engineering drawings
    • Parametric modeling techniques
    • Assembly models
    • Assembly drawings
    • Surface part models
    • The design process

    Laboratory Topics
    • Solid modeling of parts (extrusions/revolves)
    • Generation of engineering drawings
    • Solid modeling of parts (loft/shell/sweep)
    • Solid modeling of assemblies
    • Engineering design project

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Farrow
  
  • ME 2001 - Mechanics I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This is a study of force systems acting on bodies and particles that are not in motion. The course includes equivalent force/couple systems, determination of reactions, shear force and bending moment diagrams, analysis of distributed forces in structural and machine components; additional topics include analysis of forces and/or moments in trusses, frames, beams, and machine components. (prereq: high school physics, MA 136 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Draw free body diagrams for static systems
    • Perform 2-D equilibrium analysis using scalar analysis
    • Perform 3-D equilibrium analysis using vector analysis
    • Determine internal forces and/or moments in trusses, frames, beams, and machine components
    • Draw shear force and bending moment diagrams

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Scalars and vectors
    • Forces and moments
    • Differentiation
    • Engineering problem formulation and solving approach
    • Engineering design and model development
    • Numerical methods
    • Graphical communication

    Course Topics
    • Forces, vectors and the resultant
    • Forces in space
    • Vector products
    • Equilibrium of particles in 2-D and 3-D
    • Moment of a force
    • Couples, system of forces
    • Two & three-force bodies
    • Equilibrium of rigid bodies in 2-D and 3-D
    • Analysis of trusses, frames, and machines
    • Distributed forces & internal forces
    • Shear force & bending moment diagrams

     


    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic

  
  • ME 2002 - Mechanics II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second course in the mechanics sequence. Topics included in this course are: friction, flat belts, location of centroids, and evaluation of area and mass moments of inertia as well as kinematics and kinetics, impulse and momentum of particles (rectilinear and curvilinear motion). (prereq: MA 137 , ME 190 , ME 1601 , ME 2001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of particles subjected to rectilinear translation 
    • Determine the trajectory of projectiles given initial conditions
    • Determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of particles
    • Determine the acceleration or force causing acceleration using Newton’s Second Law of Motion 
    • Determine the motion of kinetic systems using the principle of work and energy 
    • Determine the motion of particles using the principle of impulse and momentum 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Free body diagram
    • Vector mechanics
    • Derivatives of a function
    • Integral of a function

    Course Topics
    • Laws of friction: basic concepts 
    • Multi-contact surfaces (wedges) 
    • Multi-contact surfaces (screws)
    • Flat belts
    • Cantroids 
    • Area moments of inertia 
    • Parallel axis theorem 
    • Mass moments of inertia 
    • Moments of inertia of composite bodies 
    • Position, velocity, acceleration 
    • Uniform rectilinear motion and acceleration 
    • Projectile motion 
    • Normal and tangential components 
    • Polar coordinates 
    • Relative motion of several particles 
    • Kinetics of particles, rectilinear motion 
    • Kinetics of particles, curvilinear motion 
    • Principle of work and energy for a particle 
    • Principle of impulse & momentum
    • Direct central impact
    • Oblique central impact

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Rizza
  
  • ME 2003 - Mechanics III

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course involves the study of motion and forces which affect motion for a rigid body.  Specific topics include dynamic force analysis, work and energy, impulse and momentum, rigid body dynamics and vibrations. Applications of rigid body dynamics include linkages and gears. (prereq: ME 2002 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine the position, velocity and acceleration of given points of a properly constrained kinematic linkage
    • Determine the acceleration or force causing acceleration using Newton’s Second Law of Motion
    • Determine the motion of kinetic systems using the principle of work and energy
    • Determine the forces acting on rigid bodies in motion

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Location of centroids
    • Evaluation of area and mass moments of inertia
    • Kinematics and kinetics
    • Impulse and momentum of particles (rectilinear and curvilinear motion)

    Course Topics
    • The principle of impulse & momentum (review)
    • Planar kinematics of rigid bodies
    • Pure translation & rotation
    • Rigid body rotation around a fixed axis
    • Absolute & relative plane motion
    • Instantaneous center of rotation
    • Absolute and relative acceleration
    • Coriolis acceleration
    • Kinetics of rigid body motion forces & acc
    • Plane motion of rigid bodies energy & momentum
    • Principle of impulse & momentum rigid body
    • Conservation of angular momentum
    • Impulsive motion
    • Eccentric impact

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Farrow
  
  • ME 2004 - Mechanics of Materials I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Topics include stresses and strains produced by axial loading, torsion, and bending; elastic deflections of beams; effects of combined loading; and buckling of slender columns. (prereq: MA 137 ) (coreq: ME 2002 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine stresses resulting from axial, bending, torsion, and transverse loading
    • Apply Hooke’s law for materials with linear stress-strain behavior
    • Determine the stress state in a member resulting from combinations of loads
    • Determine principal stresses for a state of plane stress
    • Determine beam deflections
    • Identify and solve statically indeterminate beam problems
    • Utilize Euler’s equation to predict buckling limit loads for columns with various end conditions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Statics
    • Integral calculus
    • Differential calculus

    Course Topics
    • Review of statics, reactions, and internal loads, basic axial stress and 1-D Hooke’s law
    • Axial stress concentrations, axial deformation, and mechanical properties of materials
    • Poisson’s ratio, shear stress and strain, 3-D Hooke’s law, and plane stress and strain
    • Stress on an inclined surface and stress transformation
    • Mohr’s circle for plane stress principle stresses, maximum shearing stresses, principle planes, and planes of maximum shear
    • Statically indeterminate axial members, torsion, angle of twist, and power transmission
    • Simple bending (flexural formula), transverse shear
    • Combined loading
    • Beam deflection
    • Euler buckling

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Sevier
  
  • ME 2101 - Principles of Thermodynamics I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The first subject in engineering thermodynamics for the mechanical engineering student uses the classical approach. The subject material serves as a building block for all thermodynamic oriented subjects to follow. Specific topics include definitions, First Law, heat and work transfer, and open- and closed-system energy balances. Water, as both steam and compressed liquid, and ideal gases are the principal substances considered. (prereq: MA 2323 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use thermodynamic tables to find properties
    • Apply the ideal gas, incompressible liquid, and pure substance models to thermodynamic problems
    • Write an energy balance for a closed system
    • Use the closed system energy balance to evaluate processes, including determining work and heat transfer
    • Write an energy balance for a steady flow open system
    • Use the open system energy balance to evaluate processes, including determining work and heat transfer
    • Use the open system energy balance to evaluate transient processes
    • Appreciate the link between energy use and the environment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Multivariable calculus

    Course Topics
    • Systems and control volumes
    • Properties of a system
    • State and equilibrium
    • Processes and cycles
    • Temperature and the zeroeth law of thermodynamics
    • Standard thermal science problem solving methodology
    • Forms of energy
    • Mechanisms of heat transfer
    • Mechanisms of work transfer
    • First law of thermodynamics
    • Energy conversion efficiencies
    • Energy and the environment
    • Phases of a pure substance
    • Phase-change processes
    • Property diagrams
    • Property tables
    • Ideas gas law
    • Compressibility factor
    • Closed system energy balances
    • Boundary work
    • Specific heats
    • Internal energy, enthalpy, and specific heats of ideal gases
    • Internal energy, enthalpy, and specific heats of liquids and solids
    • Conservation of mass
    • Energy of a flowing fluid
    • Open system energy balances
    • Steady flow engineering devices
    • Unsteady flow processes

    Coordinator
    Dr. Prabhakar Venkateswaran
  
  • ME 3005 - Mechanics of Materials II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the study of mechanics of deformable bodies. Topics include thermal stress and strain, thin and thick-walled pressure vessels, three dimensional stresses, ductile and brittle material failure theories, fluctuationing stresses, and fatigue. Laboratory topics include experiments to reinforce stress/strain behaviors covered in ME 2004  and this course. (prereq: ME 207  or ME 2004 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine column buckling loads
    • Determine principal stresses in 3D state of stress
    • Analyze members subject to temperature change
    • Determine stresses in thick and thin-walled pressure vessels
    • Use failure theories under static loading
    • Use fatigues failure criteria for members subject to fluctuating loads
    • Determine stresses in curved beams

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Mechanics of Materials I

    Course Topics
    • Design of concentric and eccentric column
    • Thermal stress and strain
    • 3-D deformation
    • Normal and shear strains
    • 3-D stress
    • Thin-walled pressure vessels
    • Thick-walled pressure vessels
    • Torsion of non-circular cross-sections
    • 3-D principle stresses
    • Tresca and Von Mises failure criterion
    • Columb-Mohr failure criterion
    • Fully reversed fatigue
    • S-N cure prediction
    • Effect of fluctuating stresses

    Laboratory Topics
    • Deflection of a statically indeterminate beam
    • Column buckling
    • Curved beam stresses

    Coordinator
    Dr. Mohammad Mahinfalah
  
  • ME 3102 - Principles of Thermodynamics II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is a continuation of introductory thermodynamic concepts for mechanical engineering students. The course begins with a detailed treatment of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics. Isentropic efficiency, irreversibility, and exergy are covered. Thermodynamic principles are applied to the study of gas power cycles, vapor power cycles, and refrigeration cycles. Thermodynamic performance parameters are used to characterize the cycles, including a discussion of energy use and environmental impacts. (prereq: ME 2101 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the different statements of the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics
    • Determine when the 2nd Law is violated in hypothetical engineering scenarios
    • Interpret processes and cycles on T-s and P-v diagrams
    • Apply a 2nd Law analysis (entropy and exergy balance) to processes involving both closed and open systems
    • Evaluate the performance of Rankine and Brayton cycles, with their modifications
    • Evaluate the performance of refrigeration cycles
    • Relate energy conversion efficiency to emissions and economics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Multivariable calculus
    • First-law analysis of open and closed systems
    • Thermodynamic properties
    • Thermodynamic processes and cycles

    Course Topics
    • Thermal energy reservoirs
    • Heat engines
    • Thermal efficiency
    • Kelvin Planck statement of the 2nd Law
    • Refrigerators and heat pumps
    • Coefficient of performance
    • Clausius statement of the 2nd Law
    • Perpetual motion machines
    • Reversible and irreversible processes
    • Carnot cycle
    • Carnot principles
    • Carnot heat engine
    • Carnot refrigerator and heat pump
    • Entropy
    • The increase in entropy principle
    • Entropy change of pure substances
    • Isentropic processes
    • Property diagrams
    • Statistical thermodynamics interpretation of entropy
    • T-s diagrams
    • Tds relations
    • Entropy change of solids and liquids
    • Entropy change of ideal gases
    • Isentropic efficiency of steady flow devices
    • Entropy balances on open and closed systems
    • Exergy
    • Reversible work and irreversibility
    • 2nd Law efficiency
    • The decrease in exergy principle
    • Carnot cycle
    • Air-standard assumptions
    • Brayton cycle
    • Brayton cycle with regeneration
    • Brayton cycle with reheat and intercooling
    • Carnot vapor cycle
    • Rankine cycle
    • Actual vs. ideal Rankine cycle processes
    • Increasing the efficiency of the Rankine cycle
    • Ideal reheat Rankine cycle
    • Ideal regenerative Rankine cycle
    • Cogeneration
    • Combined gas-vapor power cycles
    • Reversed Carnot cycle
    • Ideal vapor-compression refrigeration cycle
    • Actual vapor-compression refrigeration cycle

    Coordinator
    Dr. Prabhakar Venkateswaran
  
  • ME 3103 - Fluid Mechanics I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course begins framing the field of Fluid Mechanics within the larger area of continuum mechanics. Relevant fluid properties are defined, including stresses and strain rate descriptions. Applications of the Bernoulli equation and its restrictions, along with control volume analyses resulting in continuity, momentum and energy equations are the principal problem-solving methods used in this course. Fluid kinematics will be covered and help students transition from Fluids I to topics covered in Fluids II. (prereq: ME 2002  or ME 206 , MA 232  or MA 2323 , MA 235 , PH 2031  or PH 2030)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define a fluid’s properties and their relations to stress and strain rates
    • Apply the fluid-static equation to determine pressure at a point
    • Apply the Bernoulli equations to a variety of problems and define when it can and cannot be used
    • Apply the control volume forms of the mass, energy, and momentum equations to variety of problems
    • Determine the equation for a streamline and the acceleration of fluid for a given flow field

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Dynamics
    • Multivariable calculus
    • Differential equations
    • Thermal physics (at college sophomore level)

    Course Topics
    • Fluid fundamentals: definitions and properties
    • Fluid statics
    • Elementary fluid dynamics
    • Control volume approach for mass, energy, and momentum
    • Fluid kinematics
    • Laminar vs. turbulent flow
    • Introduction to viscous pipe flow
    • Major and minor losses in pipe networks

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nathan Patterson
  
  • ME 3104 - Fluid Mechanics II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on differential relations for treating fluid flow problems. The theory developed will allow students to pursue advanced practice in fluid dynamics (e.g. computational fluid dynamics). In addition to differential relations and potential flow theory, this course covers dimensional analysis/similitude, viscous flow in pipes, and external flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are applied to fluid mechanics problems both analytically and numerically. (prereq: ME 3103  or ME 317)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply the concepts of stream function and velocity potential
    • Characterize simple potential flow fields
    • Analyze certain types of flows using Navier-Stokes equations
    • Use numerical analysis to solve potential flow problems
    • Apply the Pi theorem to determine the number of dimensionless groups governing fluid flow phenomena
    • Develop a set of dimensionless variables for a given flow situation
    • Recognize and use common dimensionless groups
    • Discuss the use of dimensionless variables in the design and analysis of experiments
    • Apply the concepts of modeling and similitude to develop prediction equations
    • Identify and explain various characteristics of the flow in pipes
    • Discuss the main properties of laminar and turbulent pipe flow and appreciate their differences
    • Calculate losses in straight portions of pipes as well as those in pipe system components
    • Predict the flowrate in a pipe by use of common flowmeters
    • Identify and discuss the features of external flow
    • Explain the fundamental characteristics of a boundary layer, including laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes
    • Calculate boundary layer parameters for flow past a flat plate
    • Explain the physical process of boundary layer separation
    • Calculate the drag force for various objects
    • Quantify the uncertainty of results of fluid flow experiments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Introductory fluid mechanics
    • Vector calculus
    • Differential equations
    • Partial derivatives

    Course Topics
    • Differential analysis of fluid flow
    • Fluid element kinematics
    • Differential forms of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations
    • Euler’s equations of motion
    • Bernoilli equation
    • Irrotational flow
    • The velocity potential
    • Potential flow
    • Stress-deformation relationships for viscous flow
    • The Navier-Stokes equations
    • Numerical methods for differential analysis of fluid flow
    • Dimensional analysis, similitude, and modeling
    • Pi theorem
    • Determination of Pi therms
    • Common dimensionless groups in fluid mechanics
    • Correlation of experimental data
    • Modeling and similitude
    • Theory of models
    • Scale models
    • Viscous flow in pipes
    • Laminar vs. turbulent flow
    • Entrance region and fully developed flow
    • Fully developed laminar flow
    • Fully developed turbulent flow
    • Turbulence modeling
    • External flow
    • Lift and drag force
    • Boundary layer characteristics
    • Prandtl/Blasius boundary layer solution
    • Effects of pressure gradient
    • Friction drag
    • Pressure drag
    • Drag coefficient
    • Design of experiments
    • Turbomachinery
    • Pumps, pump characteristics and pump selection

    Laboratory Topics
    • Required labs:
      • Vortex shedding from a cylinder in a cross-flow with accompanying CFD simulation
      • Form and skin friction drag on a cylinder
      • Pump test
      • Pipe and pipe fitting losses
    • Other labs:
      • Turbulent duct flow
      • Viscosity experiment and accompanying CFD simulation
      • Numerical solution of velocity distribution in a boundary layer (MATLAB/Ansys)
      • Velocity profile in circular and rectangular ducts (MATLAB/Ansys)
      • Potential flow over an object (MATLAB/Ansys)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nathan Patterson
  
  • ME 3105 - Applied Thermodynamics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of the thermodynamic sequence, with emphasis on applications of thermodynamic principles to typical engineering systems. New topics include internal combustion engine cycles, thermodynamic property relations, psychrometrics, combustion, with an introduction to renewable energy technologies. Design projects and laboratory experiments are used to illustrate the application of First and Second law analysis and heat transfer. Devices such as engines, refrigeration cycles, cogeneration systems, and solar energy systems will be experimentally studied. (prereq: ME 3102 , ME 318 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the characteristics and differences among reciprocating engine cycles
    • Perform energy balances on processes used to model reciprocating engine cycles
    • Calculate reciprocating engine performance parameters
    • Apply partial differential relations to develop thermodynamic property relations
    • Use Maxwell relations to solve thermodynamic problems
    • Calculate thermodynamic properties of gas mixtures
    • Evaluate relative humidity by using the psychrometric chart
    • Balance combustion reactions involving hydrocarbon fuels
    • Perform energy balances on combustion processes
    • Calculate the adiabatic flame temperature for combustion processes
    • Use exhaust gas measurements to determine air fuel mixtures in combustion systems
    • Assess the impact of combustion parameters on pollutant emissions and control
    • Explain the current status and relative importance of different forms of renewable energy systems including solar, wind, and biomass
    • Design an experiment for performance characterization of an energy supply system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Multivariable calculus
    • Differential equations
    • 1st law analysis
    • 2nd law analysis
    • Power and refrigeration cycles
    • Heat transfer

    Course Topics
    • Overview of reciprocating engines
    • Otto cycle
    • Diesel cycle
    • Dual cycle
    • Engine design and performance parameters including IMEP, BMEP, friction work, bsfc, volumetric efficiency
    • Thermodynamic property relations
    • Partial differential relations
    • Developing property relations
    • Maxwell relations
    • Clapeyron equation
    • Joule-Thomson coefficient
    • Gas mixtures
    • Mass and mole fractions
    • Properties of gas mixtures
    • Psychrometerics and air conditioning
    • Relative humidity
    • Dew-point temperature
    • Web-bulb temperature
    • The psychrometric chart
    • Air conditioning processes
    • Chemical reactions
    • Balancing combustion reactions
    • Air fuel ratio
    • Equivalence ratio
    • Exhaust gas analysis for determining air fuel ratio
    • Enthalpy of formation, enthalpy of combustion, and heating values
    • First-law analysis of reacting systems
    • Adiabatic flame temperature
    • Pollutant emissions and control from combustion systems
    • Overview of renewable energy systems
    • Design and performance of one or more of the following: solar photovoltaic systems, solar thermal systems, wind energy systems, biomass energy systems

    Laboratory Topics
    Required labs:

    • Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) reciprocating engine performance
    • Cogeneration system performance characterization
    • Design of an energy systems experiment

    Other labs:

    • Hydrogen fuel cell performance
    • Vapor compression refrigeration performance
    • Solar photovoltaic system performance
    • Solar thermal system performance parameter modeling, characterization,  and validation
    • Modeling and validation of a lumped capacitance transient energy system
    • Psychrometric processes

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Damm

  
  • ME 3301 - Instrumentation

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This is a course in the modeling and selection of measurement devices and techniques in mechanical engineering design.  Steady-state and transient sensor performance characteristics, signal processing, and data acquisition techniques will be introduced. (prereq: ME 1301 , ME 230 , and ME 2101 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the physical operating principles of common sensor technologies
    • Know the characteristics and performance parameters of sensors
    • Measure physical phenomenon with proper sensors
    • Address sampling and quantization challenges

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic circuits
    • System dynamics
    • Simulation with MATLAB and Simulink

    Course Topics
    • Measurement and uncertainty analysis
    • 1st and 2nd - order response
    • Data acquisition and A/D conversion
    • Sampling and quantization effects
    • Op-amps and signal conditioning (amplification and filtering)
    • Digital filters
    • Wheatstone Bridge
    • Fast Fourier analysis
    • Sensor calibration
    • Measurement: current, voltage, temperature, velocity, acceleration, strain, and force

    Laboratory Topics
    • Density determination of a metal and propagation of error
    • Introduction to instrumentation equipment
    • Effects of sampling, A/D conversion, and digital filters
    • Op-amps and signal conditioning
    • Measurement of temperature
    • Acceleration measurement
    • FFT and the vibration of a marimba bar
    • Encoders and angular velocity measurement
    • Measurement of strain and force

    Coordinator
    Dr. Luis A. Rodriguez

  
  • ME 3650 - Systematic Engineering Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents methods for consistent problem solving in the research and development environment. Creativity is coupled to systematic engineering processes. A project work is included, based on realistic mechanical engineering problems. The fundamental steps in product development are introduced. Specifying a requirements list, applying a methodical search for solutions, developing a concept in a specification booklet, and sketches of complete machine concepts are components of this course.  A final report is required as well as a presentation of the results in front of student audience. (prereq: participation in THL/MSOE exchange program)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Arrange in a team environment, distributing work evenly
    • Demonstrate problem-solving methods and their use
    • Implement a basic product development process
    • Define problems and evaluate solution methods
    • Determine requirements and specifications
    • Assess solutions and their variants
    • Produce sketches and drawings
    • Construct a simple physical model of the final concept to show scale and interdependencies
    • Produce a technical document with the necessary information
    • Develop information according to rules, legislation, and/or standards
    • Demonstrate team skills 
    • Present project results in front of an audience

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Junior standing

    Course Topics
    • Machine component design process
    • Literature search
    • Drawing and computer drafting
    • Written and oral presentation techniques
    • Intercultural and social competence

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic
  
  • ME 4220 - Fatigue and Fracture in Mechanical Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a detailed treatment of fatigue failure due to cyclic loading of mechanical components. Design approaches for high cycle (stress-life) are briefly reviewed. Methods for low cycle (plastic strain-life) problems are presented. Numerous design examples are provided.  Advanced topics include Neuber’s rule for not strain analysis and fatigue under multi-axial stresses, and variable amplitude loading. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics concepts are introduced, with applications to “Fail-Safe” Design approach and problems in fatigue crack growth rate using Paris’ law. Microscopic and macroscopic features of fatigue and fracture are discussed in the context of performing failure analysis of failed parts. (prereq: ME 3005 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the distinction between “high” cycle versus “low” cycle fatigue problems and correctly choose an appropriate analysis method for a design problem
    • Understand cyclic plastic strain behavior and be able to apply mathematical models for cyclic plastic strain to design problems
    • Apply strain-life methods for low cycle fatigue
    • Combine notch-strain analysis using Neuber’s rule with low cycle fatigue analysis for component life predictions
    • Understand basic concepts in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM)
    • Apply basic LEFM models to problems in 1) fracture of metals, 2) fatigue crack growth rate, and 3) fail safe design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Stress-life approach to fatigue problems
    • Mechanics of Materials

    Course Topics
    • Review - fatigue basics, stress-life diagrams, stress concentrations, notch sensitivity, mean stress effects
    • Variable amplitude load histories
    • Low cycle fatigue (plastic strain cycling, 2 to 1000 cycle life)
    • Cyclic stress-strain curves & plastic strain-life diagrams (ε-N diagrams)
    • Notch strain analysis, Neuber’s rule
    • Microscopic/material aspects of fatigue
    • Fracture mechanics (stress intensity factor & plane strain fracture toughness)
    • Fatigue crack growth rate, Paris’ law
    • Failure analysis - observations on failed parts
    • “Fail Safe” design practices

    Coordinator
    Dr. Mathew Schaefer
  
  • ME 4250 - Additive Manufacturing

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    This course leverages the availability of multiple additive manufacturing technologies on campus to give students the opportunity to design for and create parts with each technology.  Fused deposition modeling, stereolithography, selective laser sintering, powder bed, and inkjet technologies will be explained along with the benefits and pitfalls of designing for each of them.  Printed part finishing and processing techniques will be covered (prereq: senior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Maintain, diagnose problems with, and repair a FDM-based 3D printer
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of how to design for FDM, SLA, and SLS 3D printing technologies
    • Identify potential problem areas, in terms of printability and final part functionality, for a given design and 3D printing technology
    • Formulate and convey constructive criticism and useful feedback about designs created by others

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Fused deposition/fused filament modeling
    • Design and assembly of an FDM/FFF printers
    • Part strength due to build orientation
    • Post-processing requirements
    • Alternative extrusion-based systems
    • Stereolithography (SLA)
    • Technology overview and machine demo at the RPC
    • Benefits of accuracy and speed
    • Post-processing requirements
    • SLA and mold creation for rubber/urethane casting
    • Selective Laser Sintering (SLS and others)
    • Technology overview and machine demo at the RPC
    • Benefits of not needing supports
    • Design considerations for plastics vs metals
    • Part finishing and processing
    • Electroplating
    • Hydrographic printing
    • Metal casting

                 


    Coordinator
    Dr. Nathan Patterson

  
  • ME 4302 - Automatic Control Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to automatic controls in mechanical engineering applications, including fluid power and electromechanical systems. Root locus and frequency domain methods are used to model and analyze basic feedback control systems. Laboratory experiments use fluid power, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (prereq: ME 3301 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use Laplace transformation and selected linearization techniques
    • Develop mathematical models of selected systems
    • Determine system stability using root locus techniques
    • Determine steady state errors due to reference and disturbance inputs
    • Construct root locus plots and use them to evaluate system transient response characteristics
    • Construct and analyze Bode plots

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • System dynamics
    • Instrumentation

    Course Topics
    • Mathematical models of systems
    • State variable models
    • Feedback control systems characteristics
    • Performance of feedback control systems
    • Stability of linear feedback systems
    • Root locus method
    • Frequency response methods
    • Stability in the frequency domain

    Laboratory Topics
    • Laboratory measurement techniques
    • Dynamic system measurements and system identification
    • Steady-state valve characteristics
    • Dynamic response characteristics
    • Control system simulation
    • Rotary speed control
    • Position control

    Coordinator
    Dr. Daniel Williams
  
  • ME 4303 - Electromechanical Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course extends the concepts of instrumentation and control to the design of electromechanical systems. Topics will include modeling, simulation, and implementation of analog and digital control algorithms. The course includes an electromechanical systems design project. (prereq: ME 4302 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop mathematical models of electromechnical components and systems
    • Formulate and evaluate analog and digital controllers
    • Specify and evaluate state feedback controllers
    • Design an electromechanical system to achieve specified performance objectives
    • Apply frequency response design tools for stability analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Laplace transforms
    • Feedback control systems
    • Numerical methods

    Course Topics
    • Gain and phase margins
    • Phase lead and phase lag controllers
    • DC motor modeling
    • Z-transforms
    • Difference equations
    • State feedback
    • Z-domain control implementation
    • Digital system effects

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Cook
  
  • ME 4304 - Introduction to Robotic Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the kinematics, dynamics and control of open chain robots and mobile platforms to create innovative solutions to assist humans at home, offices, and public places with repetitive chores and/or help persons with disabilities. Simulation tools (e.g., MATLAB and Simulink) will be used to visualize, plan and validate the required motions. (prereq: ME 2003 , ME 230 , MA 383 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine the forward and inverse kinematics for typical serial chained robots
    • Use rotational matrices and homogeneous transformations to describe coordinate frames
    • Simulate robot motion using MATLAB/Simulink
    • Model the kinematics of a differential drive robot
    • Implement control strategies to plan robot motions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Differential equations
    • Dynamics of systems
    • Block diagrams
    • Matrix operations

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to robots
    • Coordinate frames, rigid motion and homogeneous transforms
    • Rotation matrices and parameterized rotations
    • Displacements, compositions of rigid motions
    • Forward and inverse kinematics
    • Velocity kinematics & manipulator Jacobian
    • Singularities
    • Static forces
    • Motion planning and trajectory generation
    • Dynamics
    • Independent joint control
    • Feedforward compensation
    • PD with gravity compensation
    • Mobile robot kinematics
    • Differential drive kinematics
    • Projects: Online programming of UR3 Cobot & Offline programming of ABB Industrial Robot

    Coordinator
    Dr. Luis A. Rodriguez
  
  • ME 4305 - Mechanical System Simulation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the conversion of mathematical models of mechanical engineering phenomena and systems to block diagram form.  Emphasis is placed on creating a sampling of simulation models of basic components and then using those basic models to build more complex system models of interacting components.  Completed models are tested for validity and then used to observe dynamic response, steady-state performance, and other system outcomes.  Models will also be used to understand the influence of system parameters on the outcomes.  Specific areas that will be explored are mechanical system dynamics, fluid power motion, and vehicle drive train performance scenarios.  System model development, simulations and analyses will be accomplished using MATLAB and Simulink. (prereq: (ME 230  or EE 3050 ) and MA 235 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Implement a variety of mathematical relationships into block diagram models
    • Create and validate simulation models of basic component behavior
    • Combine basic models into more complex system models
    • Conduct design analyses to understand the influence of specific parameters on system performance
    • Develop a better understanding of system behavior pertaining to fluid power, power trains, and mechanics
    • Learn to learn from system modeling activity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Laplace transfer functions
    • Differential equations
    • Mechanical system modeling
    • Dynamic systems

    Course Topics
    • Behavioral models of fluid power elements: pumps, motors, cylinders, volumes and valves
    • Behavioral models of power train elements: engines, clutches, torque converters, gear reductions
    • Behavioral models of spring-mass-damper systems: translational and rotational
    • Using Simulink to study sub-system interactions and system performance
    • Using MATLAB to automate design studies that implement the Simulink models

    Coordinator
    Dr. Daniel Williams
  
  • ME 4602 - Transient and Nonlinear Finite Element Methods

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a mechanical engineering technical elective whose purpose is to introduce students to the finite element method applied to structural and thermal problems of both a transient dynamic nature and a nonlinear nature. In the lecture portion of the course, students will be instructed in formulation of a finite element procedure for solving any differential equation in space or time. Also, students will be taught how time integration algorithms are used in conjunction with distributed modeling and how nonlinearities are handled by the finite element method. A laboratory portion of the course will be planned using a commercial software code for the purposes of extending the one-dimensional transient algorithms for more complex applications. (prereq: ME 460 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have reviewed the procedural steps involved in FEA analysis
    • Derive a finite element formulation from a governing differential equation
    • Understand and implement time integration of dynamic systems with inertia
    • Understand step-wise linearization of nonlinear systems
    • Understand and implement iterative solution techniques for nonlinear systems
    • Be familiar with use of a commercial general-purpose FEA software package for transient applications
    • Understand how to validate results for problems involving systems design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Mechanics of materials
    • Statics
    • Dynamics
    • Heat transfer
    • Linear algebra
    • Integral and differential calculus

    Course Topics
    • Review of the method
    • Method of weighted residuals
    • Comparison with energy methods
    • Modal analysis
    • Modeling inertia and mass distribution using FEA
    • Modeling damping in continuous systems using FEA
    • Understanding and implementing time integration algorithms for dynamic FEA analysis
    • Implementing nonlinear FEA solutions as a set of iterative, quasi-linearized sub-problems
    • Use commercial general-purpose FEA software package for transient and nonlinear applications
    • Review of static analysis
    • Modal analysis and transient analysis
    • Nonlinear structural analysis
    • Transient, nonlinear thermal conduction, convection, and radiation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Validate results for real design of an engineering system (4 week course project)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic
  
  • ME 4610 - Medical Applications in Mechanical Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Mechanical engineers are responsible for the design, analysis, and construction of various devices employed by medical professionals. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the analytical and experimental techniques employed in industry in the design and analysis of these devices. Topics include mechanics of bone, kinematics of human gait (walking), and analysis of certain medical devices including implants, orthotics, and spinal devices. (prereq: ME 207  or ME 2004 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discern the role that engineering mechanics and engineering design play in the development, analysis and utilization of mechanical devices
    • Understand how mechanics and mechanical engineering principles may be applied to the modeling of bone and soft tissues
    • Understand the kinematics and kinetics involved in human gait

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic strength of materials and statics

    Course Topics
    • Basic anatomy
    • Biomedical engineering materials
    • Mechanics, material and mechanical properties of bone, bone remodeling
    • Implants and failure of implants
    • Plates and screws
    • FEA modeling of biomedical systems
    • Spine mechanics
    • Torso mechanics
    • Clinical function of the spine
    • Mechanics of scoliosis and correction
    • Scoliosis correction devices
    • Experimental testing and verification of spinal mechanics (and laboratory exercise)
    • Viscoelastic models
    • Muscle mechanics
    • Link-Segment models
    • Forces in joints
    • Force plates
    • Pressure sensors

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Rizza
  
  • ME 4701 - Fluid Power Circuits

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to hydraulic fluid power systems.  Topics include the advantages and limitations of fluid power, the basic properties of hydraulic fluids, the major components of fluid power systems, schematic circuit representation, and steady-state system performance analysis.  Various types of loads are studied and related to the required hydraulic performance. Hydraulic pumps, motors, and actuators are described, and steady state sizing relationships are presented relating pressures and flow rates.  Pressure and flow control valves, as well as directional control valves are studied individually and as employed in specific hydraulic circuits.  Hydrostatic transmissions, accumulators, and pump controls strategies for energy conservation are also covered. (prereq: ME 206  or ME 2001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Size hydraulic components based on steady state requirements
    • Read a hydraulic schematic to determine the function of the circuit
    • Design a hydraulic circuit based on input requirements and standard components
    • Select pump controls to minimize energy consumption

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Ability to use free body diagrams
    • Understanding of forces and motion

    Course Topics
    • Fluid properties 
    • unit conversions 
    • Hydraulic system schematics
    • Pumps & motors
    • Cylinders
    • Directional control valves 
    • Flow and pressure control valves
    • Flow losses
    • valve controlled cylinders and motors
    • Cavitation
    • Hydrostatic transmissions
    • Auxiliary components
    • Fixed vs. variable displacement pumps
    • Load sensing
    • Pressure and flow compensation
    • Power consumption and efficiency
    • Flow forces
    • Basic linkage analysis
    • Accumulator application and sizing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Daniel Williams
  
  • ME 4702 - Fluid Power Modeling

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course first reviews the operating principles and performance of standard fluid power components such as pumps, motors, valves, and cylinders, and how they interact to perform as a system.  Then it builds on the steady-state fluid power system analysis mindset to provide an introduction to dynamic modeling of hydraulic fluid power systems.  It explores the topic of modeling the dynamic interaction of hydraulic components and mechanical loads, as well as the feedback control of such systems.  Hydro-mechanical system model development, control, analysis, and simulation using MATLAB/Simulink will be addressed via student projects (soft labs).  (prereq: ME 230  and ME 4701  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Linearize equations to develop linear models
    • Develop steady state models of pumps and valves
    • Develop dynamic models of the pumps and valves
    • Combine component models to form system models
    • Use the developed models to assess hydraulic circuit performance
    • Conduct design studies understand how parameters affect performance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Interactions of components in a system
    • Dynamic systems

    Coordinator
    Dr. Daniel Williams
  
  • ME 4802 - Compressible Flow

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the fundamental concepts and results for the compressible flow of gases. Topics to be covered include conservation laws, propagation of disturbances, isentropic flow, compressible flow in ducts with area changes, normal and oblique shock waves and applications, Prandtl-Meyer flow and applications, simple flows such as Fanno flow and Rayleigh flow with applications to nozzles, and propulsion related concepts. The emphasis will be on the physical understanding of the phenomena and basic analytical results. (prereq: ME 3102 , ME 3104 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate the ability to utilize the adiabatic and isentropic flow relations to solve typical flow problems
    • Demonstrate the ability to solve typical normal-shock problems, problems involving moving normal shocks or oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer flow problems by use of appropriate equations or tables or charts
    • Demonstrate the ability to solve typical Fanno flow problems and Rayleigh flow problems by use of appropriate equations and tables
    • Explain choking and shock in various applications and contexts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Fluid mechanics (control volume mass, momentum and energy analysis)
    • Thermodynamics-II (covering Second Law of Thermodynamics)

    Course Topics
    • Review of the fundamentals (Laws of Thermodynamics, conservation of mass, momentum and energy, entropy changes for perfect gases, stagnation properties)
    • Introduction to compressible flow (sonic velocity, Mach number, stagnation relations in terms of Mach number, total pressure loss and entropy change relation)
    • Varying-area adiabatic flow (convergent-divergent nozzle, diffuser, choking, isentropic flow tables)
    • Standing normal shocks
    • Moving and oblique (planar or conical) shocks
    • Prandtl-Meyer flow (including lift and drag calculations on airfoils at various angles of attack, and discussion on overexpanded and underexpanded nozzles)
    • Supersonic nozzle experiment and Mach number calculations
    • Fanno flow and applications
    • Rayleigh flow and applications
    • Topic: applications of compressible flow in propulsion systems (Example-ramjet engine)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Prabhakar Venkateswaran
  
  • ME 4804 - Advanced Energy Technologies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a detailed engineering treatment of various emerging energy technologies. Engineering design, thermodynamic performance, environmental impacts, and economic considerations are included in the analysis of advanced and sustainable energy systems. Course topics will be chosen from among the following: fuel cells, cogeneration systems, geothermal energy, hydroenergy, nuclear energy, energy from the oceans, hybrid energy systems, and other transportation options. (prereq: ME 2101  or ME 354  or AE 2121  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Course outcomes vary depending on the selected topics for the quarter

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Classical thermodynamics (energy balances)

    Course Topics
    • Topics are chosen from the list given above in the course description based partly on student interest

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Damm
  
  • ME 4805 - Renewable Energy Utilization

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the primary renewable energy technologies. Engineering design, thermodynamic performance, environmental impacts, and economic considerations are included in the analysis of renewable energy systems. System types include solar photovoltaic panels, solar thermal technology, biofuel technology, and wind energy. A comparative analysis of energy storage systems is also covered. (prereq: ME 2101  or equivalent and ME 3104  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Appreciate the challenges facing world energy supply and use
    • Predict the solar energy resource at any location on earth
    • Develop an understanding of the science of photovoltaic devices and solar thermal systems
    • Apply engineering design principles to solar power generation installations
    • Perform economic analysis of solar power systems
    • Analyze the energy potential of biofuels, the technology of biofuels production, and the economic advantages and disadvantages of energy from biomass
    • Develop an understanding of the science and engineering of wind energy systems
    • Appreciate the engineering necessity and comparable performance of storage systems for renewable energy

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Classical thermodynamics (energy balances)

    Course Topics
    • World and US energy picture
    • The solar resource
    • Solar photovoltaic systems
    • Solar thermal systems
    • Energy from biomass
    • Wind resources
    • Wind turbine performance prediction
    • Simulation tools for solar energy simulation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Damm
  
  • ME 4806 - Computational Fluid Dynamics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds a fundamental understanding of the underlying partial differential equations for fluid flow and provides experience with the numerical tools available for solving fluid flow problems. Commercial software will be employed for certain flow problems. (prereq: ME 3104 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of the governing equations of fluid mechanics
    • Understand the mathematical properties of the governing equations and be able to evaluate boundary/initial value problems
    • Demonstrate a systematic approach to solving the appropriate governing equations using CFD
    • Qualitatively analyze numerical results and provide appropriate data plotting
    • Recognize strengths and limitations of CFD techniques
    • Understand the differences between different CFD turbulence models
    • Exercise simulation capability with commercial software

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Fluid mechanics
    • Numerical methods

    Course Topics
    • Fluid dynamics
    • Numerical methods
    • Vorticity-streamfunction
    • RANs turbulence modeling
    • Finite volume analysis
    • Post processing
    • Simulation with commercial software

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulation with commercial CFD software, e.g. ANSYS Fluent
    • Simulation of cavity flow: vorticity/steam function
    • Flow around bluff bodies: turbulence and flow separation
    • Post processing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nathan Patterson
  
  • ME 4906 - Applied Numerical Methods

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a capstone numerical methods experience meant to complement the dynamic systems sequence core concepts. The course will contain a focus on lumped modeling with specific reference to multi-degree of freedom eigenanalysis for linear systems as well as a strong focus on issues arising due to system nonlinearity and feasibility of linearization. (prereq: MA 383 , ME 230 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Solve fully nonlinear ordinary differential equations/initial value problems (IVP)
    • Apply principles from linear systems to fully nonlinear systems
    • Postulate and solve eigenvalue/eigenvector problems with applications to modal analysis and buckling

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations
    • Linear algebra

    Course Topics
    • Differential equations
    • Linear algebra
    • System similitude
    • Review of system dynamics
    • Lagrange’s equations
    • Constraints vis Lagrange multipliers
    • Dynamic system simulation ODEs
    • Eigen analysis
    • Lagrange multipliers

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic
  
  • ME 4951 - Bachelor Thesis I

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course involves the performance, documentation and defense of individual project work to meet the requirements for the THL/MSOE dual degree program. (prereq: ME 490  and participation in the THL/MSOE exchange program)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • The student is expected to write an in-depth thesis documenting the student’s process that recognizes, defines, solves, and validates a scientific or engineering task within a specified time

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Project dependent

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic
  
  • ME 4952 - Bachelor Thesis II

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course involves the performance, documentation and defense of individual project work to meet the requirements for the THL/MSOE dual degree program. (prereq: ME 4951 , ME 491 , and participation in the THL/MSOE exchange program)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Write an in-depth thesis documenting the student’s process that recognizes, defines, solves, and validates a scientific or engineering task within a specified time

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Project dependent

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic
  
  • ME 5305 - Mechanical System Simulation

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the conversion of mathematical models of physical in mechanical systems to block diagram form suitable for simulation software.  Simulation models of a sampling of basic components are created and then used to build more complex dynamic system models of interacting components.  Completed models are tested for validity and used to observe dynamic response, steady-state performance, and other system outcomes.  Models are also used to understand the influence of system parameters on predicted performance.  Specific areas that will be explored are mechanical system dynamics, fluid power motion, and vehicle drive train performance scenarios.  Model development, simulations and analyses will be completed with MATLAB and Simulink. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Implement a variety of mathematical relationships as block diagram models
    • Create and analytically validate simulation models of basic component behavior
    • Combine basic models into more complex system models
    • Conduct design analysis to understand the influence of specific parameters on system performance
    • Develop an understanding of system behavior pertaining to fluid power, power trains, and mechanics
    • Learn from system modeling activity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    •   Laplace transforms and transfer functions
    •   Differential equations
    •   Mechanical system models
    •   Dynamic systems
    •   Basic MATLAB and Simulink familiarity or ability to learn it in the course

    Course Topics
    • Modeling fluid power components: pumps, motors, cylinders, volumes and valves
    • Modeling power train elements: engines, torque converters, gear reductions
    • Modeling spring-mass-damper systems: translational and rotational
    • Modeling systems of components

    Laboratory Topics
    • Creating Simulink models to study sub-system interactions and system performance
    • Using MATLAB to automate design studies that exercise the Simulink models and process simulation results

    Coordinator
    Dr. Daniel Williams
  
  • ME 5601 - Microelectromechanical Systems Fundamentals

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the modeling, analysis, and design of microelectromechanical systems. The development of first-principles is emphasized with sufficient review of material science, engineering mechanics, and thermofluids for microsystems design.  Various sensing and actuation devices will be analyzed, and scaling laws for miniaturization will be reviewed to highlight the dominant mechanisms at the microscale.  Materials and fabrication processes for microsystems and micromanufacturing methods will be covered.  Students will get an opportunity to do case studies on microsystems design and review the current literature on the ever-growing research advances in MEMS. (prereq: GE 601 or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply mechanics and thermofluids concepts in miniaturizing engineering systems
    • Apply scaling laws to identify dominant mechanisms at microscale
    • Design/analyze microsensors, microactuators
    • Select materials and processes for microsystems design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Engineering mechanics
    • Systems dynamics

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and overview
    • Microsystems working principles: sensing microsystems working principles: actuation
    • Doping, diffusion, electrochemistry
    • Engineering mechanics for microsystems
    • Thermofluid engineering and microsystems
    • Scaling Laws in miniaturization
    • More problems on sensors and actuators
    • Materials for MEMS
    • Fabrication processes for microsystems
    • Microsystems design and case studies
    • Case study samples: BP Sensor, microphone, acceleration sensors, gyros, airbag deployment in an automobile, aerospace: cockpit instrumentation, optical MEMS, RF MEMS, noise in MEMS

    Coordinator
    Dr. Subha Kumpaty

Naval Science

  
  • NS 1001 - Drill and Information Briefing

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Weekly formations focusing on Marine Corps and Navy drill, ceremonies, and inspections. Classroom instruction on special interest areas to the prospective naval officer such as financial responsibilities, career opportunities, leadership, maritime strategy, national security and sailing. Instruction and application of the fundamentals of unit organization, the chain of command, and how to properly wear and inspect uniforms. Required of all NROTC students. S/U grade assessment. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop leadership, management, and initiative

    Course Topics
    • Professional customs and courtesies
    • General military training
    • Professional community seminars

  
  • NS 1009 - Introduction to Naval Science

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    General introduction to seapower and the naval service. The instruction places particular emphasis on the mission, organization, regulations and broad warfare components of the Navy. Included is an overview of officer and enlisted rank and rating structures, procurement and recruitment, training and education, promotion and advancement, and retirement policies. Non-NROTC students require consent of department chair. Offered fall term. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend the relationship of seapower to national interests and maritime strategy in both peace and war
    • Know the impact and significance of geography and Sea Lines of Communication on maritime strategy and naval operations
    • Know the missions and functions of the U.S. Navy as described in maritime strategy
    • Comprehend the importance of maritime partnerships and coalition operations
    • Comprehend the importance of a forward naval presence to maritime strategy through forward stationed and rotationally deployed forces
    • Comprehend the mission and basic organization of the Navy and Marine Corps

    Course Topics
    • Uniform Code of Military Justice and Military Law
    • Navy terminology and nomenclature
    • Naval Correspondence
    • Navy Platforms, personnel, and locations

  
  • NS 1022 - Sea Power and Maritime Affairs 1

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Introduction to the history of the high seas. Designed to give a thorough understanding of naval and maritime tradition and its evolution through the centuries. Will discuss the importance of sea power and how it has applied to U.S. national interests in the past and present. (prereq: non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand historical methodologies in formulation of plausible interpretations of human behavior
    • Understand complex interaction of socio-economic, political, religious and other cultural forces and how they have developed and changed over the centuries
    • Demonstrate an understanding of continuities and differences between past and present

    Course Topics
    • Significant events of world and American naval history
    • Evolution of sea power
    • Fundamental national interests
    • Uses and limits of naval service on the global stage throughout history

  
  • NS 1023 - Sea Power and Maritime Affairs 2

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of NS 1022 . Offered spring term. (prereq: NS 1022 , non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand historical methodologies in formulation of plausible interpretations of human behavior
    • Understand complex interaction of socio-economic, political, religious and other cultural forces and how they have developed and changed over the centuries
    • Demonstrate an understanding of continuities and differences between past and present

    Course Topics
    • Significant events of world and American naval history
    • Evolution of sea power
    • Fundamental national interests
    • Uses and limits of naval service on the global stage throughout history

  
  • NS 1142 - Naval Ship Systems 1

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Ship design, construction, types and missions. Ship compartmentalization, interior communications, propulsion, auxiliary power, and ship control systems. Elements of ship design for safe operation. Ship stability characteristics. Offered fall term. (prereq: non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend basic engineering concepts and their application to propulsion systems
    • Know the basic operation, key components, and safety considerations of propulsion systems
    • Know the basic principles of electrical power, generation, distribution, and electrical safety
    • Comprehend the factors and criteria for structural integrity in platform design
    • Comprehend basic principles of fluid dynamics
    • Know the purpose of the Navy maintenance programs
    • Demonstrate shipboard damage control

    Course Topics
    • Ship design and architecture
    • Steam cycle
    • Electrical systems on board naval vessels
    • Damage control
    • Generators and nuclear power

  
  • NS 1151 - Navigation 1

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Theory, principles and procedures of ship navigation and movements. Nautical astronomy, oceanographic factors, piloting, celestial navigation, celestial sights, and other navigational methods. Discusses the rules and procedures governing naval transits. (prereq: Non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the rules and regulations governing maritime travel
    • Demonstrate knowledge of different tools and platforms used to navigate at sea
    • Understanding of lights and signals used to communicate with other vessels
    • Demonstrate an ability to effectively fix position and navigate in a variety of depths of water

    Course Topics
    • Rules of the road
    • Navy publications and references
    • Buoys and lights
    • Radar and its uses
    • Charting
    • Celestial navigation

  
  • NS 1152 - Navigation 2

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of NS 1151 . Offered spring term. (prereq: NS 1151  or consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the rules and regulations governing maritime travel
    • Demonstrate knowledge of different tools and platforms used to navigate at sea
    • Understanding of lights and signals used to communicate with other vessels
    • Demonstrate an ability to effectively fix position and navigate in a variety of depths of water

    Course Topics
    • Rules of the road
    • Navy publications and references
    • Buoys and lights
    • Radar and its uses
    • Charting
    • Celestial navigation

  
  • NS 1161 - Evolution of Warfare

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Seminar format course designed to provide Marine Option ROTC Midshipmen with a basic understanding of the art, science, and concepts of warfare.  Classroom instruction focuses on United States Marine Corps warfare theory foundations, the development of conventional and unconventional warfare-to include irregular and cyber warfare-and the basics of Marine Corps amphibious doctrine.   Non-NROTC students require consent of department chair Offered alternate spring terms. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend the major cultural, technological, and doctrinal transformations in warfare
    • Develop critical thinking and public speaking skills

    Course Topics
    • Early warfighting tactics
    • Technological advances in the warfighting sphere
    • Evolution of strategy and tactics
    • Case studies

  
  • NS 1185 - Leadership and Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Stress on experiential approach to leadership and management with military emphasis. Motivation and communication theory and practice. Group dynamics and decision-making techniques. Lines of control and organizational structure. Case studies, experiential exercises and situational problems will be used. Offered fall term. (prereq: Non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an understanding of a variety of leadership styles
    • Understand group dynamics and how they affect a leader
    • Demonstrate an understanding of interpersonal factors and how the leader can inspire others

    Course Topics
    • Personality types
    • Group dynamics
    • Leadership styles/implementation of strategies

  
  • NS 2152 - Naval Operations and Seamanship 1

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Theory, principles and procedures of ship navigation, movements and employment. Tactical formations and dispositions, relative motion and maneuvering board solutions. Analysis of tactical plots for force effectiveness. (prereq: NS 1151 ; non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend purpose, scope, and constitutional basis of Navy Regulations regarding sea travel
    • Understand the importance of feedback to mission effectiveness
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of naval warfighting
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of joint operations and how the different services work together and complement each other

    Course Topics
    • Law of the Sea
    • Signals and flags
    • Air, surface, and undersea warfare
    • Radio-telephone communications
    • Strike group organization

  
  • NS 2153 - Naval Operations and Seamanship 2

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of NS 2152 . (prereq: NS 1151  and NS 2152 ; non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Comprehend purpose, scope, and constitutional basis of Navy Regulations regarding sea travel
    • Understand the importance of feedback to mission effectiveness
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of naval warfighting
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of joint operations and how the different services work together and complement each other

    Course Topics
    • Law of the Sea
    • Signals and flags
    • Air, surface, and undersea warfare
    • Radio-telephone communications
    • Strike group organization

  
  • NS 2162 - Naval Ship Systems 2

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Theory and principles of operation of naval weapons systems including types, capabilities, and limitations. Theory of target detection, acquisition, identification, and tracking. Principles of trajectories. (recommended prereq: NS 1142 ; non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know the basic characteristics and capabilities of the major weapons systems and platforms of the US naval forces
    • Comprehend weapons systems, platforms, and environmental factors
    • Know the importance of energy as a critical combat enabler and understand best practices in energy efficiency
    • Know how components of naval warfare contribute to the basic sea control and power projection missions of the naval service
    • Know the significance of intelligence in the application of naval warfare
    • Understand the need for OPSEC including recognition of the OPSEC threat

    Course Topics
    • Missiles and projectiles
    • Explosives
    • Mines
    • Trajectories and projectile motion
    • Radar and ranging
    • Sonar and its applications

  
  • NS 2163 - Naval Ship Systems 3

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Theory and principles of operation of naval weapons systems including types, capabilities, and limitations. Theory of target detection, acquisition, identification and tracking. Principles of trajectories. Offered spring term. (prereq: NS 1142  and NS 2162 , non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • NS 2186 - Leadership and Core-Value-Based Decision-Making 1

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Application of techniques and theories learned in NS 1185 . Practical application of sound leadership and ethics to Navy situations. Investigation of levels of ethical decision-making: legal, constitutional, utilitarian, divine. Examination of role of honor, courage, and commitment in leadership. (prereq: NS 1185 , non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an understanding of the legal obligations of military leaders
    • Understand the framework of various ethical theories and how they can be applied to real life situations

    Course Topics
    • None appended

    Laboratory Topics
    • Utilitarianism
    • Stoicism
    • Relativism
    • Case studies
    • Legal obligations

  
  • NS 2187 - Leadership and Core-Value-Based Decision-Making 2

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of NS 2186 . Offered spring term. (prereq: NS 1185  and NS 2186 , non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Gain an understanding of the legal obligations of military leaders
    • Understand the framework of various ethical theories and how they can be applied to real life situations

    Course Topics
    • Utilitarianism
    • Stoicism
    • Relativism
    • Case studies
    • Legal obligations

  
  • NS 2964 - Practicum in U.S. Marine Corps Leadership and Management

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Provides instruction and practical application of leadership and management techniques used in the Marine Corps and Naval Service. The course is held at the Officer Candidate School at Quantico, Virginia. S/U grade assessment. (prereq: junior standing in USMC option)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Fulfill Officer Candidate School requirement for future service as a Marine Officer

    Course Topics
    • Leadership opportunities in stressful situations
    • Physical endurance
    • History of the Marine Corps and its impact on current operations

  
  • NS 3191 - Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Broad aspects of warfare and their interactions with maneuver warfare doctrine. Specific focus on the United States Marine Corps as the premier maneuver warfare fighting institution. Historical influences on current tactical, operation, and strategic implications of maneuver warfare practices in current and future operations.  (prereq: Non-NROTC students require consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • None appended

  
  • NS 4995 - Independent Study in Naval Sciences

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Independent study of special topics in Military Science under faculty supervision. Topics selected by student/faculty conference. Course can be taken for 1-3 credits. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None appended

    Course Topics
    • None appended


Nursing

  
  • NU 220 - Health Care Terminology

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course uses a systems approach to establish a knowledge base of healthcare terminology. Students recognize, analyze, deconstruct, define medical terms, and apply them through effective communication. Offered in a blended format. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Establish a knowledge base of healthcare terminology (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Define, deconstruct, and use an accurate understanding of healthcare terminology to communicate ideas verbally and in writing (Level 2, Critical Thinking and Communication)
    • Communicate effectively the precise meaning of the word by means of proper pronunciation and precise meaning of the word in the correct context (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The human body in health and disease
    • Skeletal system
    • Muscular system
    • Cardiovascular system
    • Lymphatic and immune system
    • Respiratory system
    • Digestive system
    • Urinary system
    • Nervous system
    • Special senses
    • Integumentary system
    • Endocrine system
    • Male reproductive system
    • Female reproductive system
    • Diagnostic procedures and pharmacology

    Coordinator
    Janet DeCoopman-Winters
  
  • NU 260 - Nutrition

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces nutritional concepts related to human health and wellness across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on assessment of clients’ nutritional health. Students apply knowledge of nutrition issues related to growth and development. Topics include carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals, healthy diet, metabolism, and energy balance. May be offered in a blended format. (prereq: BI 1010 , CH 2261 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe current national dietary guidelines, exercise recommendations, and the role of nutrition and fitness in achieving and maintaining optimal health (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Use knowledge about the major sources and functions of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and water) and micronutrients (minerals and vitamins) to achieve and maintain optimal health (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze factors that influence body weight and composition and use this knowledge and concepts of metabolism and energy balance to develop a realistic plan to address obesity (Level 2, Nursing Care)  
    • Compare and contrast nutritional issues from the childbearing period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and in the elderly (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze own personal diet and apply nutritional principles to improve or maintain personal health (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Reflect on and discuss the role of sensitive and effective communication skills when counseling individuals about diet and nutrition issues (Level 2, Communication) 
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Acknowledge the importance of accessing current and reliable sources when providing nutrition-related education to clients and families (Level 2, Evidence-Based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Food choices and human health
    • Nutrition tools and standards
    • Carbohydrates
    • Vitamin C and iron
    • Alcohol and health
    • Lipids
    • Calcium and vitamin D
    • Proteins
    • Vitamin A and zinc
    • Water, sodium, potassium, magnesium, iodine, trace minerals
    • The B vitamins
    • Nutrients and physical activity
    • Vitamin E and K
    • Energy balance and weight loss
    • Nutrition and health
    • Food safety
    • Weight loss strategies
    • Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation
    • Nutrition in infancy and childhood
    • Nutrition in adolescents
    • Nutrition in elderly

    Coordinator
    Janet DeCoopman-Winters
  
  • NU 290 - Pathophysiology 1

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course provides students with the understanding of disease processes including etiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment modalities. Central concepts of pathophysiology and homeostasis provide the foundation for understanding alterations in cellular function, cardiovascular function, respiratory function, fluid and electrolyte balance and genetics. (prereq: (NU students: BI 1010  (C grade), BI 1020  (C grade), BI 1030  (C grade), BI 2040  (C grade)); (BME students: BI 2305 , BI 2315 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss diagnostic tests, nursing interventions, and treatment modalities used to address alterations in cellular and immune function; cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematopoietic systems; and fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Apply knowledge of pathophysiology to identify nursing interventions that lower risk of progression of specific disease processes. (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn. (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explain the process of cellular and tissue repair in response to injury, infection, and disease. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Define how stress and disease processes trigger systemic effects and the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Describe the pathogenesis, compensatory mechanisms, and sequelae of disease processes in cellular and immune function; cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematopoietic systems; and fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Identify the clinical manifestations of disease processes in cellular and immune function; cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematopoietic systems; and fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Explain the role of genetics alone and in combination with other factors in triggering disease processes. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Define how stress and disease processes trigger systemic effects and the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Describe the pathogenesis, compensatory mechanisms, and sequelae of disease processes in cellular and immune function; cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematopoietic systems; and fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Identify the clinical manifestations of disease processes in cellular and immune function; cardiovascular, respiratory, and hematopoietic systems; and fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Explain the role of genetics alone and in combination with other factors in triggering disease processes. (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice)

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • NU Students: Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 and 4
    • BME Students: Physiology 1 and 2

    Course Topics
    • Cellular responses to stress, injury and aging
    • Inflammation, tissue repair and fever, cell proliferation and tissue regeneration
    • Genetic control of cell function, and inheritance
    • Genetic and congenital disorders
    • Neoplasia
    • Disorders of fluid, electrolyte and acid/base balance
    • Disorders of the white blood cells and lymphoid tissue
    • Stress and adaptation
    • Mechanisms of infectious disease
    • Innate and adaptive immunity
    • Disorders of the immune system
    • Disorders of hemostasis
    • Disorders of red blood cells
    • Control of cardiovascular function, disorders of blood flow and blood pressure
    • Disorders of cardiac function
    • Heart failure and circulatory shock
    • Control of respiratory function
    • Respiratory tract infections, neoplasms, and childhood disorders

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aruna Lal

  
  • NU 299 - Global Healthcare and International Health Care Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines worldwide health, history, healthcare delivery systems, health care practice, and professional health education as compared to the United States. Students discuss how providers, nurses, and ancillary health team members are utilized in delivering health care. This course involves an optional study abroad experience designed to assist students to integrate a global perspective related to educational preparation, health care delivery, and health care policy within an international environment. The student analyzes competencies needed to be an effective healthcare manager in a multicultural and global environment and relates to the effective management of health services in his or her community. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an expanded understanding of healthcare systems in a global perspective and the main differences between the USA healthcare system and other systems around the world
    • Describe the basic principles and characteristics that define healthcare systems and health policy issues in the international arena
    • Explain the main characteristics and roles of international organizations
    • Analyze the competencies and academic preparation needed to be an effective healthcare manager in a multicultural and global environment
    • Identify the historical evolution of health care delivery and contributions from various countries
    • Compare the health delivery models in the United States compared to other countries
    • Identify health management strategies used in different countries and healthcare systems to mobilize, allocate, and maintain resources to improve health care status and delivery systems
    • Reflect and develop a personal view about international health care systems and how it could impact one’s future career

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, history and principles of global health
    • Global health determinants and measurements
    • Health education, poverty, and economy
    • Elements of a health care system
    • Ethical and human rights in global healthcare
    • Culture and health
    • Environment and health
    • Nutrition and health
    • Women’s health
    • Child health
    • Noncommunicable diseases
    • Communicable disease
    • National disasters and humanitarian health
    • Professional practice and required provider education (dependent upon the country)
    • Sustainability in global health care
    • International health care systems
      • United States
      • United Kingdom
      • Mexico/Central America
      • Australia
      • Asia

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 300 - Transcultural Nursing

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course describes cultural influences on beliefs, values, and practices in relation to health, illness, and health seeking behaviors for providing culturally congruent and competent nursing care. Students explore how perceptions, values, and roles are influenced by culture and the environment. A variety of interactive learning strategies and planned cultural excursions are incorporated in the course. (prereq: NU 2000 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Examine clients’ autonomy based on cultural factors (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Discuss the history and culture of various cultural groups in Southeastern Wisconsin (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Analyze one’s own cultural influences and reflect on the impact on person, environment, health, and nursing (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Apply knowledge of social and cultural factors that affect nursing and health care outcomes (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Create culturally appropriate outcomes for diverse populations (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Reflect on heterogeneous health care practices within various cultural groups (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Recognize the importance of changing attitudes and values that support cultural competence (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Identify and integrate evidence-based practice in providing culturally competent care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, cultural diversity of SE Wisconsin
    • What is culture?   
    • 21st century culturally competent care
    • Current theoretical frameworks
    • Select populations: Hispanic childbearing practices
    • Select populations: health care in Hmong communities
    • Ethical decisions in cultural competence
    • Select populations: Wisconsin’s Hispanic/Latino communities
    • Culturally sensitive communication strategies
    • Vulnerable populations
    • Mental health and stigma
    • Cultural competency in physical assessment
    • Selected population issues:  Muslim, immigrant and refugee communities
    • Evidence-based practice and pain across cultures
    • Cultural competency in organizations
    • Select populations: Judaism and sensory impaired
    • End of life and African Americans  

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aruna Lal
  
  • NU 350 - Nursing Care of Older Adults

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows students to apply their knowledge and experiences in adult health to the specialized care of older adults. Students explore the health care needs and issues in gerontological nursing and how to maximize wellness and the quality of life for older adults. This course focuses on the healthy aging processes and risk factors that affect the health and functioning of older adults. Emphasized are the nursing approaches to managing the needs and risk factors associated with aging.  (prereq: NU 3000  or RN license)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze physiological and psychological changes in normal aging (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Apply health promotion and wellness concepts to older adults through the end of life (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Compare and contrast valid and reliable assessment tools used to guide nursing practice decisions for older adults (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Apply critical thinking in recognizing the complex interaction of acute and chronic comorbid physical and mental conditions and associated treatments common to older adults (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Differentiate pharmacodynamics and polypharmacy in the older adult (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Assess the barriers for older adults in receiving and understanding information and identify strategies to communicate effectively with older adults (Level 3, Communication)
    • Recognize facts and myths of aging and compare one’s own views and attitudes toward aging (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Analyze environmental, economic, cultural, and ethical influences on health outcomes for geriatric clients (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Course Topics
    • Promoting wellness
    • Psychosocial and cognitive function
    • Delirium, depression, and dementia
    • Hearing and vision
    • Cardiovascular and respiratory function
    • Mobility and safety
    • Integumentary
    • Digestion and nutrition
    • Urinary function
    • Sleep and rest
    • Thermoregulation
    • Sexual function
    • Medication concerns
    • Diversity
    • Literacy
    • Diverse healthcare settings
    • Legal and ethical concerns
    • Elder abuse and neglect
    • End of life

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 390 - Evidence-Based Nursing Practice

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to concepts of the research process and its application to nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on students becoming knowledgeable consumers of research as they expand their nursing practice. (prereq: MA 315  or MA 340 , NU 3000 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Complete a review of the literature guided by a PICOT question (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Examine the role of the nurse in research and development of evidence-based practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Develop skill in accessing knowledge technology through appropriate selection of databases and strategies to search the literature to locate the best evidence (Level 3, Technology)
    • Explore techniques to promote evidence-based practice decisions in nursing practice (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)
    • Compare and contrast the purpose and methodologies of quantitative and qualitative research (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)
    • Analyze and disseminate knowledge grounded in nursing science through examination of nursing practice, nursing research, and published literature (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to nursing research and evidence-based practice
    • Understanding the research process and ethical Issues in nursing research
    • Understanding evidence-based practice
    • Searching the literature and developing evidence tables
    • Develop a PICO and PEO question to guide an integrative literature review
    • Selecting and defining a problem
    • Applying appropriate theories and conceptual models 
    • Formulating hypotheses and research questions
    • Selecting the sample and setting
    • Principles of measurement
    • Data collection methods 
    • Analyzing the data
    • Quantitative research design 
    • Qualitative research design
    • Interpreting and reporting research findings
    • Critiquing research as reported in the literature

    Coordinator
    Dr. Kathy Mussatto
  
  • NU 391 - Pathophysiology II

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a continuation of knowledge in the understanding of the disease process, including etiology, manifestations, diagnoses and treatment modalities. Topics covered include alterations in the functions of male and female genitourinary system, gastrointestinal system, endocrine function and metabolism alteration and renal function. Further topics include alterations in neural function, neurophysiological function, musculoskeletal functions and integumentary system. (prereq: NU 290 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss diagnostic tests, nursing interventions, and treatment modalities used to address alterations in male and female genitourinary systems; gastrointestinal, renal, neural, neurophysiological, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems; and endocrine and metabolism alterations (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Apply knowledge of pathophysiology to identify nursing interventions that lower risk of progression of specific disease processes (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explain the role of genetics alone and in combination with other factors in triggering disease processes (Level 1, Evidence-based Practice)
    • Describe the pathogenesis, compensatory mechanisms, and sequelae of disease processes in male and female genitourinary systems; gastrointestinal, renal, neural, neurophysiological, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems; and endocrine and metabolism alterations (Level 1, Evidence-based Practice)
    • Identify the clinical manifestations of disease processes in male and female genitourinary systems; gastrointestinal, renal, neural, neurophysiological, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems; and endocrine and metabolism alterations (Level 1, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Disorders of ventilation and gas exchange
    • Structure and function of the kidney
    • Disorders of renal function
    • Disorders of the bladder and lower urinary tract
    • Structure and disorders of the GI system
    • Disorders of hepatobiliary and exocrine pancreas
    • Disorders of endocrine function
    • Diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome
    • Organization and control of neural function
    • Somatosensory function of pain
    • Disorders of neuromuscular function
    • Disorders of brain function
    • Disorders of musculoskeletal metabolic
    • Rheumatic function
    • Sexually transmitted infections
    • Disorders of male genitourinary/reproductive system
    • Disorders of female genitourinary/reproductive system
    • Disorders of sensory function
    • Disorders of skin integumentary function

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 395 - Interprofessional Education (IPE)

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a one time or series of interprofessional educational (IPE) engagement opportunities where students from two or more healthcare professions learn about, from, and with each other. IPE activities are designed to provide opportunity for students to deliberately work together with other health professionals to develop leadership qualities and mutual respect for one another’s knowledge and skill sets. Student participation in the IPE activities facilitate a climate of mutual respect and shared values necessary in today’s complex healthcare environment to achieve the common goal of improving patient outcomes.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop knowledge of the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice
    • Explore the educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and scope of practice of different healthcare professions
    • Apply the knowledge of one’s own role and those of other healthcare professions to assess and collaboratively address the healthcare needs of patients and significant others
    • Organize and communicate information with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals in an understandable, responsive, and respectful manner that supports a team approach
    • Identify opportunities for improvement in patient care through collaboration and teamwork within and between healthcare teams
    • Evaluate team performance and provide suggestions for individual and team improvement

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Topic varies with each IPE event

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jane Paige
  
  • NU 450 - Gerontological Management of Care

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the health and care of older adults with an emphasis on acute care and chronic care of the older adult. This course includes identification of disease risk factors associated with aging and reasons elderly are not able to remain in their homes. Students will develop respect and an appreciation for the older adult in disease management and advanced pharmacology. Analysis will be conducted on internal and external stressors that influence developmental tasks and activities of daily living encompassing the physiological, psychological, and sociological health dimensions. (prereq: NU 350 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Implement strategies through use of evidence-based practice guidelines to prevent and/or identify and manage geriatric syndromes (AACN Gerontological Essentials IV & IX)
    • Analyze the complex interaction of acute and chronic co-morbid physical and mental conditions and associated treatments common to older adults (AACN Gerontological Essential IX)
    • Apply advanced pharmacological concepts in the management of acute and chronic illness of older adults
    • Compare models of care that promote safe, quality physical and mental health care for older adults such as PACE, NICHE, Guided Care, Culture Change, and Transitional Care Models (AACN Gerontological Essential II)
    • Integrate evidence-based research and relevant theories into the delivery of client-centered care for older adults (AACN Gerontological Essential I)
    • Integrate leadership and communication techniques that foster discussion and reflection on the extent to which diversity (among nurses, ancillary personnel, therapists, physicians, and patients) has the potential to impact the care of older adults (AACN Gerontological Essential VI)
    • Facilitate safe and effective transitions across levels of care that include acute, community-based and long-term care for older adults and their families (AACN Gerontological Essentials IV & IX)
    • Assess and develop plan of care for older adults with complex chronic illness and their caregivers (AACN Gerontological Essentials IX)

    Course Topics
    • Acute and chronic care of gerontological mental health care
    • Pharmacology for acute and chronic illness
    • Chronic illness and disease management and care
    • Special populations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 455 - Gerontological Policy, Service and Social Issues

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on policy and social issues affecting the care of the older adult. Topics include the legal and ethical considerations in aging, competencies in Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN), and principles that provide direction to promote, restore, and maintain the health of the older adult patient. Caregiving and social support are areas to be explored. (prereq: NU 3000  or RN license)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Intervene to assist older adults and their support networks to achieve personal goals, based on the analysis of the living environment and availability of community resources (AACN Gerontological Essential VII)
    • Analyze actual or potential mistreatment (physical, mental or financial abuse, and/or self-neglect) in older adults and initiate appropriate referrals (AACN Gerontological Essential V)
    • Recognize and respect the variations of care, the increased complexity, and the increased use of healthcare resources inherent in caring for older adults (AACN Gerontological Essentials IV & IX)
    • Facilitate ethical, non-coercive decision making by older adults and/or families/caregivers for maintaining everyday living, receiving treatment, initiating advance directives, and implementing end-of-life care (AACN Gerontological Essential VIII)
    • Promote evidence-based practice and Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) principles that promote safety in care (AACN Gerontological Essential II)
    • Plan client-centered care with consideration for the caregivers and their mental and physical health (AACN Gerontological Essential IX)
    • Utilize resources and programs to promote functional, physical, and mental wellness in older adults and their caregivers (AACN Gerontological Essential VII)

    Course Topics
    • Aging and caregiving
    • Abuse/legal Issues
    • Bioethics
    • Economic resource issues
    • Government/state policy issues on Medicare
    • Health care economics
    • QSEN/AHRQ social policy concerns and EBP
    • Quality and safety initiatives
    • Restraints (chemical and physical)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 485 - Senior Nursing Preceptorship

    2 lecture hours 12 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the synthesis of professional nursing concepts. Through clinical immersion in a selected area of practice and under mentorship of a preceptor, students transition into the role of the professional nurse. (prereq: NU 4600 , NU 4710 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care through analytical use of the nursing process during a clinical immersion experience while assuming an increasingly independent role (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Employ reflective narrative analysis and critical thinking skills to synthesize professional nursing concepts and develop personal goals for transitioning into role of professional nurse (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Consistently employ appropriate and effective communication skills with healthcare team members to minimize risk and error during clinical immersion experience (Level 4, Communication)
    • Assume a professional role that is responsive to a changing society while maintaining the client in full partnership in an atmosphere of care and compassion (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Develop one’s professional identity and increase self-confidence and awareness of one’s strengths and weaknesses through active engagement in activities that prepare for transition to the role of a professional nurse (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, and evaluate health information technology and biomedical technologies to support safe and quality nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Provide value-based leadership when collaborating with other health care team members to improve outcomes for individuals, families, and the healthcare system during a clinical immersion experience (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Synthesize research findings and knowledge on best practices drawn from professional literature into decisions that ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Reflective practice
    • Caring
    • Emotional intelligence
    • Transitioning to practice
    • Graduate nurse interviewing

    Laboratory Topics
    • Clinical focus: clinical immersion

    Coordinator
    April Pellmann
  
  • NU 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature survey, analysis, design or clinical study. A final evaluation, the format of which is left to the discretion of the faculty advisor, is required at the end of the quarter. (prereq: junior standing, up to three credits may be taken with approval of program director in consultation with chair of School of Nursing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Course outcomes and evaluation criteria are determined by course faculty

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jane Paige
  
  • NU 499 IR - Instructional Review

    1 to 6 credits
    Course Description
    This course is for a nursing student who had a gap of two or more consecutive quarters (excluding summer for traditional students) between clinical courses who was unable to demonstrate the competencies of the last nursing clinical course through a formal assessment. If the student is not successful in the instructional review, the student must repeat the last nursing clinical course under assessment. The instructional review is completed as a satisfactory/unsatisfactory course. (prereq: unsuccessful formal assessment of prior clinical nursing course)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Course outcomes and evaluation criteria are determined by course faculty

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dawn Wojtkiewicz-Hudzinski
  
  • NU 2000 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of issues related to professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the historical evolution of the nursing metaparadigm. Topics include legal/ethical/theoretical issues in nursing, standards of professional practice, critical thinking, the nursing process, and appropriate use of APA style and format.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate understanding of caring, person, environment, health, and nursing as core concepts in professional nursing practice (Level 1, Nursing Care).
    • Discuss the five concepts of nursing (caring, person, environment, health, and nursing) and how they have been shaped by political, social, economic, and cultural factors (Level 1, Nursing Care).
    • Use strategies to develop critical thinking skills and clinical judgement (Level 1, Critical Thinking).
    • Develop effective writing skills to organize and convey ideas using appropriate APA style and format. (Level 1, Communication).
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role).
    • Describe the concept of nursing as a social contract and how the American Nurses Association’s Standards and Scope of Professional Nursing Practice and other key documents are used to define, delineate, and guide nursing practice and ethics (Level 1, Professional Role).
    • Describe the role of the nurse as a member of the healthcare team and provider of care (Level 1, Professional Role).
    • Appreciate the complexities of the US health system and its impact on the nursing profession (Level 1, Professional Role).
    • Use available knowledge technology to communicate verbally and in writing. (Level 1, Technology).
    • Discuss how theories guide and communicate ideas, drive inquiry into nursing issues, and advance the body of nursing science (Level 1, Evidence-Based Practice).

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • MSOE School of Nursing, vision, mission, and conceptual framework
    • Philosophies and Theories of Nursing
    • History of Nursing and Health
    • American Nursing and U.S. healthcare system
    • Nursing metaparadigm
    • Nursing in the future
    • Nursing and Policy: Social Policy Statement
    • Standards of Nursing Practice and Standards of Professional Performance
    • APA formatting and style
    • Student support services, study skills, test taking strategies for academic success

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jessica Barkimer
  
  • NU 2011 - Health Concepts and Health Assessment

    4 lecture hours 6 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares nursing students for the role of the professional registered nurse and provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a health assessment of individual clients of all ages. Emphasis is placed on understanding professional nursing practice in context of its social contract with society, learning the nursing process, and Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Student conducts a comprehensive health history using effective communication skills and physical examination inclusive of diagnostic tests and identification of normal lab values. Opportunities are provided to apply assessment skills in a variety of settings. Students apply the functional health patterns in the development of a behavioral change project to promote their own health. (prereq: CH 2261 , BI 256 , BI 1010  (C grade), BI 1020  (C grade), BI 1030  (C grade), BI 2040  (C grade), NU 220 , NU 2000 , or acceptance into B.S. in Nursing Accelerated Second Degree (BSN-ASD) program) (coreq: NU 290 , NU 2810 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss factors that promote health and explain how healthy lifestyles can help maintain health and prevent illness (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Summarize one’s personal health and apply a health model to guide a personal behavior change (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Conduct a comprehensive health assessment of an individual client using the Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns as a framework (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Differentiate health assessment techniques appropriate for the developmental level and age of the client (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Distinguish normal and expected assessment findings from abnormal and unexpected findings gathered during history intake, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and from lab values (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach and process to conduct a comprehensive health assessment (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills being sensitive to privacy and confidentiality when collecting assessment data from clients (Level 2, Communication)
    • Summarize health assessment findings and accurately record data (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • State criteria that define nursing as a profession and identify various career paths within nursing (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Describe the role of the nurse as a member of the health care team and provider of care (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Appropriately select and operate biomedical technology to collect assessment data (Level 2, Technology)
    • Discuss relevant nursing literature related to health assessments (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction of health concepts and health assessment
    • Health/change models
    • Behavior change project
    • Professional nursing practice
    • Introduction of health assessment
    • Interview and history guided by Functional Health Patterns (FHP)
    • Comprehensive physical assessment guided by FHP
    • Documentation
    • Health assessment of the newborn and infant
    • Health assessment of children and adolescents
    • Health assessment of the older adult
    • Health assessment of the pregnant adult
    • Lab values and diagnostics
    • Summary analysis of health assessment findings
    • Case studies
    • Nursing process: assessment & diagnosis, outcomes, interventions, evaluation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Health history
    • Physical assessment
    • Clinical experiences: well-elder, newborn and daycare assessment

    Coordinator
    Diane Dettinger
  
  • NU 2011C - Health Concepts and Assessment

    0 lecture hours 6 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares nursing students for the role of the professional registered nurse and provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a health assessment of individual clients of all ages. Emphasis is placed on understanding professional nursing practice in context of its social contract with society, learning the nursing process, and Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Student conducts a comprehensive health history using effective communication skills and physical examination inclusive of diagnostic tests and identification of normal lab values. Opportunities are provided to apply assessment skills in a variety of settings. Students apply the functional health patterns in the development of a behavioral change project to promote their own health. (prereq: CH 2261, BI 256, BI 1010 (C grade), BI 1020 (C grade), BI 1030 (C grade), BI 2040 (C grade), NU 220, NU 2000, or acceptance into B.S. in Nursing Accelerated Second Degree (BSN-ASD) program. NU 2011D  must be a prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 290, NU 2810)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss factors that promote health and explain how healthy lifestyles can help maintain health and prevent illness (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Summarize one’s personal health and apply a health model to guide a personal behavior change (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Conduct a comprehensive health assessment of an individual client using the Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns as a framework (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Differentiate health assessment techniques appropriate for the developmental level and age of the client (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Distinguish normal and expected assessment findings from abnormal and unexpected findings gathered during history intake, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and from lab values (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach and process to conduct a comprehensive health assessment (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills being sensitive to privacy and confidentiality when collecting assessment data from clients (Level 2, Communication)
    • Summarize health assessment findings and accurately record data (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • State criteria that define nursing as a profession and identify various career paths within nursing (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Describe the role of the nurse as a member of the health care team and provider of care (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Appropriately select and operate biomedical technology to collect assessment data (Level 2, Technology)
    • Discuss relevant nursing literature related to health assessments (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction of health concepts and health assessment
    • Health/change models
    • Behavior change project
    • Professional nursing practice
    • Introduction of health assessment
    • Interview and history guided by Functional Health Patterns (FHP)
    • Comprehensive physical assessment guided by FHP
    • Documentation
    • Health assessment of the newborn and infant
    • Health assessment of children and adolescents
    • Health assessment of the older adult
    • Health assessment of the pregnant adult
    • Lab values and diagnostics
    • Summary analysis of health assessment findings
    • Case studies
    • Nursing process: assessment & diagnosis, outcomes, interventions, evaluation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Health history
    • Physical assessment
    • Clinical experiences: well-elder, newborn, and daycare assessment

    Coordinator
    Diane Dettinger
  
  • NU 2011D - Health Concepts and Assessment

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares nursing students for the role of the professional registered nurse and provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a health assessment of individual clients of all ages. Emphasis is placed on understanding professional nursing practice in context of its social contract with society, learning the nursing process, and Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Student conducts a comprehensive health history using effective communication skills and physical examination inclusive of diagnostic tests and identification of normal lab values. Opportunities are provided to apply assessment skills in a variety of settings. Students apply the functional health patterns in the development of a behavioral change project to promote their own health. (prereq: CH 2261, BI 256, BI 1010 (C grade), BI 1020 (C grade), BI 1030 (C grade), BI 2040 (C grade), NU 220, NU 2000, or acceptance into B.S. in Nursing Accelerated Second Degree (BSN-ASD) program) (coreq: NU 290, NU 2810)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss factors that promote health and explain how healthy lifestyles can help maintain health and prevent illness (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Summarize one’s personal health and apply a health model to guide a personal behavior change (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Conduct a comprehensive health assessment of an individual client using the Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns as a framework (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Differentiate health assessment techniques appropriate for the developmental level and age of the client (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Distinguish normal and expected assessment findings from abnormal and unexpected findings gathered during history intake, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and from lab values (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach and process to conduct a comprehensive health assessment (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills being sensitive to privacy and confidentiality when collecting assessment data from clients (Level 2, Communication)
    • Summarize health assessment findings and accurately record data (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • State criteria that define nursing as a profession and identify various career paths within nursing (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Describe the role of the nurse as a member of the health care team and provider of care (Level 1, Professional Role)
    • Appropriately select and operate biomedical technology to collect assessment data (Level 2, Technology)
    • Discuss relevant nursing literature related to health assessments (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction of health concepts and health assessment
    • Health/change models
    • Behavior change project
    • Professional nursing practice
    • Introduction of health assessment
    • Interview and history guided by Functional Health Patterns (FHP)
    • Comprehensive physical assessment guided by FHP
    • Documentation
    • Health assessment of the newborn and infant
    • Health assessment of children and adolescents
    • Health assessment of the older adult
    • Health assessment of the pregnant adult
    • Lab values and diagnostics
    • Summary analysis of health assessment findings
    • Case studies
    • Nursing process: assessment & diagnosis, outcomes, interventions, evaluation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Health history
    • Physical assessment
    • Clinical experiences: well-elder, newborn, and daycare assessment

    Coordinator
    Diane Dettinger
  
  • NU 2320 - Health Assessment of Family

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis in this course is assessment of family and the nurse’s role in partnering with families to achieve optimal health outcomes. The student is introduced to the value of theoretical frameworks such as Family Systems Theory, Family Development and Life Cycle Theory, Bio-ecological Systems Theory, and Chronic Illness Framework as the basis for nursing practice. The family health history focuses on family strengths including family genogram and importance of considering genetics/genomics in identifying risk factors. The family home will be discussed as a significant variable in family health status. The important role of family members in health care decisions, relationships within families and the role of the nurse in creating family friendly situations and environments in health care settings will be addressed. (prereq: CH 2261 , NU 2000 , NU 220 BI 256 , BI 1010  (C grade), BI 1020  (C grade), BI 1030  (C grade), BI 2040  (C grade))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use appropriate frameworks to complete assessment of families (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Apply theoretical frameworks and concepts to explore factors in a family’s environment that influence health (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate cultural sensitivity, ethical principles, and effective communication skills when interacting with families and communities (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Participate in a site visit to a community resource for families and reflect on the role of the professional nurse in the selected setting (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate understanding of the role of the professional nurse and collaborate with families in conducting health assessments (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Conduct a comprehensive family health assessment integrating knowledge from professional literature and evidence-based practice (Level 2, Evidence-based practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    •  None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to family nursing
    • Family home visit
    • Family nursing theories
    • Family assessment
    • Health promotion in the family
    • Family social policy and health disparities
    • Genetics/genomics and the family
    • Developing cultural competence in nursing care of families
    • Families in palliative and end-of-life care
    • Families living with chronic conditions
    • Family nursing with childbearing family
    • Gerontological family nursing
    • Trauma and family nursing
    • Family child health nursing

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robin Gates
  
  • NU 2520 - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care

    4 lecture hours 9 lab hours 7 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion, and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011 NU 290 ) (coreq: NU 2820 , NU 391 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development; the experience of aging
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern; risk for injury - Impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration, Risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers, obesity, less than body requirements, risk for infection, alteration in thermoregulation hypo/hyperthermia
    • Health perception-health maintenance; risk for suffocation; health seeking behavior/readiness for enhanced knowledge, risk for poisoning, latex allergy
    • Professional practice: nursing process, documentation, licensing, legal issues, client rights and ethics, health care teams, delegation, collaboration and communication, conflict resolution
    • Evidence-based practice, client safety initiatives
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking, knowing deficit
    • Activity-exercise pattern: impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls, deficient diversional activity
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance / readiness for enhanced sleep
    • Sexuality-reproductive: ineffective sexuality pattern
    • Values-belief; readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being
    • Coping-stress tolerance: ineffective individual coping, ineffective denial - substance abuse
    • Risk for injury, suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: grief and death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness
    • Disabled family coping, domestic violence
    • Readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept: anxiety and fear

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab, hazards of Immobility
    • Simulations: pediatric simulation: teaching and med administration; domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: skilled nursing facility

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2520C - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care

    0 lecture hours 9 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion, and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011NU 290. NU 2520D  must be a prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 2820, NU 391)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development; the experience of aging
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern; risk for injury - Impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration, Risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers, obesity, less than body requirements, risk for infection, alteration in thermoregulation hypo/hyperthermia
    • Health perception-health maintenance; risk for suffocation; health seeking behavior/readiness for enhanced knowledge, risk for poisoning, latex allergy
    • Professional practice: nursing process, documentation, licensing, legal issues, client rights and ethics, health care teams, delegation, collaboration and communication, conflict resolution
    • Evidence-based practice, client safety initiatives
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking, knowing deficit
    • Activity-exercise pattern: impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls, deficient diversional activity
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance / readiness for enhanced sleep
    • Sexuality-reproductive: ineffective sexuality pattern
    • Values-belief; readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being
    • Coping-stress tolerance: ineffective individual coping, ineffective denial - substance abuse
    • Risk for injury, suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: grief and death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness
    • Disabled family coping, domestic violence
    • Readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept: anxiety and fear

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab, hazards of Immobility
    • Simulations: pediatric simulation: teaching and med administration; domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: skilled nursing facility

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2520D - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion, and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011NU 290) (coreq: NU 2820, NU 391)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development; the experience of aging
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern; risk for injury - Impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration, Risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers, obesity, less than body requirements, risk for infection, alteration in thermoregulation hypo/hyperthermia
    • Health perception-health maintenance; risk for suffocation; health seeking behavior/readiness for enhanced knowledge, risk for poisoning, latex allergy
    • Professional practice: nursing process, documentation, licensing, legal issues, client rights and ethics, health care teams, delegation, collaboration and communication, conflict resolution
    • Evidence-based practice, client safety initiatives
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking, knowing deficit
    • Activity-exercise pattern: impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls, deficient diversional activity
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance / readiness for enhanced sleep
    • Sexuality-reproductive: ineffective sexuality pattern
    • Values-belief; readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being
    • Coping-stress tolerance: ineffective individual coping, ineffective denial - substance abuse
    • Risk for injury, suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: grief and death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness
    • Disabled family coping, domestic violence
    • Readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept: anxiety and fear

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab, hazards of Immobility
    • Simulations: pediatric simulation: teaching and med administration; domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: skilled nursing facility

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2521 - Primary Concepts and Dynamics of Nursing Care

    4 lecture hours 12 lab hours 8 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated and expanded use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011 , NU 290 , NU 2810 ) (coreq: NU 391 , NU 2820 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence Based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development: The experience of aging
    • Health perception-health management: health seeking behavior/ readiness for enhanced well-being
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for injury - impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration: altered oral mucous membranes
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking
    • Nutrition/metabolic: malnutrition, less than body requirements, more than body requirements; alteration in thermoregulation; hypo/hyperthermia; fever management
    • Activity-exercise pattern: Impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls; impaired gas exchange; ineffective breathing patterns, ineffective airway clearance: nursing care of clients with atelectasis, pneumonia; nursing care of clients with pulmonary embolus and tuberculosis
    • Professional nursing issues: evidence-based practice, licensing, legal issues, patient rights, ethics, documentation, health care teams; delegation, collaboration and communication; conflict resolution, critical pathways, prevention through patient safety initiatives
    • Cognitive - perceptual: deficit knowledge
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance/ readiness for enhanced sleep/ sleep deprivation
    • Sexuality-reproductive: altered sexuality
    • Activity/exercise pattern: coping-stress tolerance: risk for injury, disabled family coping, domestic violence; ineffective denial: substance abuse; anxiety: mild, moderate, anticipatory, ineffective individual coping;
    • Activity-exercise: deficit diversional activity
    • Coping-stress tolerance:
    • Self-perception/self-concept: readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept, fear
    • Coping-stress pattern
    • Health maintenance/health promotion: risk for suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: anticipatory grief, dysfunctional grief, death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness, risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Values/beliefs pattern: readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab:, aazards of immobility, abnormal assessment, pulmonary hygiene, oxygen therapy, nebulizer and peak flow meter, Incision and wound care, orthopedic care
    • Simulation: domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: long-term care and rehabilitation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2521C - Primary Concepts and Dynamics of Nursing Care

    0 lecture hours 12 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated and expanded use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011, NU 290, NU 2810. NU 2521D  must be prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 391, NU 2820)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development: The experience of aging
    • Health perception-health management: health seeking behavior/ readiness for enhanced well-being
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for injury - impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration: altered oral mucous membranes
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking
    • Nutrition/metabolic: malnutrition, less than body requirements, more than body requirements; alteration in thermoregulation; hypo/hyperthermia; fever management
    • Activity-exercise pattern: Impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls; impaired gas exchange; ineffective breathing patterns, ineffective airway clearance: nursing care of clients with atelectasis, pneumonia; nursing care of clients with pulmonary embolus and tuberculosis
    • Professional nursing issues: evidence-based practice, licensing, legal issues, patient rights, ethics, documentation, health care teams; delegation, collaboration and communication; conflict resolution, critical pathways, prevention through patient safety initiatives
    • Cognitive - perceptual: deficit knowledge
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance/ readiness for enhanced sleep/ sleep deprivation
    • Sexuality-reproductive: altered sexuality
    • Activity/exercise pattern: coping-stress tolerance: risk for injury, disabled family coping, domestic violence; ineffective denial: substance abuse; anxiety: mild, moderate, anticipatory, ineffective individual coping;
    • Activity-exercise: deficit diversional activity
    • Coping-stress tolerance:
    • Self-perception/self-concept: readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept, fear
    • Coping-stress pattern
    • Health maintenance/health promotion: risk for suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: anticipatory grief, dysfunctional grief, death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness, risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Values/beliefs pattern: readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab:, aazards of immobility, abnormal assessment, pulmonary hygiene, oxygen therapy, nebulizer and peak flow meter, Incision and wound care, orthopedic care
    • Simulation: domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: long-term care and rehabilitation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2521D - Primary Concepts and Dynamics of Nursing Care

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the application of basic concepts appropriate to professional nursing care. These concepts include the nursing process, critical thinking, role expectations, illness prevention, health restoration, health promotion and health maintenance across the lifespan. The design of this course promotes the integrated and expanded use of the nursing process in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of care. Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and nursing diagnostic categories based on the work of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) are used to organize assessment data and the plan of care for clients. (prereq: NU 2011, NU 290, NU 2810) (coreq: NU 391, NU 2820)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to deliver safe, effective, compassionate holistic care to individuals and families with a focus on health promotion, health maintenance, and illness prevention (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Develop, revise, and communicate a plan of nursing care that reflects logical thinking (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the steps of the nursing process to clients (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in application of the nursing process to develop a health education project (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate professional roles of care provider, advocate, and educator in the delivery of nursing care (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Explore the use of health information technology to document and record client data and select appropriate biomedical technology for use in client care (Level 2, Technology)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the principles associated with delegation and collaborative practice (Level 2, Collaboration)
    • Develop foundational knowledge of the components of evidence-based practice and its importance in nursing practice (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Growth and development: The experience of aging
    • Health perception-health management: health seeking behavior/ readiness for enhanced well-being
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for injury - impaired swallowing/risk for aspiration: altered oral mucous membranes
    • Nutrition-metabolic pattern: risk for impaired skin integrity/pressure ulcers
    • Cognitive-perceptual: critical thinking
    • Nutrition/metabolic: malnutrition, less than body requirements, more than body requirements; alteration in thermoregulation; hypo/hyperthermia; fever management
    • Activity-exercise pattern: Impaired physical mobility, impaired ambulation. risk for falls; impaired gas exchange; ineffective breathing patterns, ineffective airway clearance: nursing care of clients with atelectasis, pneumonia; nursing care of clients with pulmonary embolus and tuberculosis
    • Professional nursing issues: evidence-based practice, licensing, legal issues, patient rights, ethics, documentation, health care teams; delegation, collaboration and communication; conflict resolution, critical pathways, prevention through patient safety initiatives
    • Cognitive - perceptual: deficit knowledge
    • Sleep-rest pattern: sleep pattern disturbance/ readiness for enhanced sleep/ sleep deprivation
    • Sexuality-reproductive: altered sexuality
    • Activity/exercise pattern: coping-stress tolerance: risk for injury, disabled family coping, domestic violence; ineffective denial: substance abuse; anxiety: mild, moderate, anticipatory, ineffective individual coping;
    • Activity-exercise: deficit diversional activity
    • Coping-stress tolerance:
    • Self-perception/self-concept: readiness for enhanced self-concept, disturbed self-concept, fear
    • Coping-stress pattern
    • Health maintenance/health promotion: risk for suffocation
    • Role-relationship pattern: anticipatory grief, dysfunctional grief, death across the lifespan, risk for loneliness/loneliness, risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Risk for poisoning, allergic responses, latex allergy
    • Values/beliefs pattern: readiness for enhanced spiritual well-being

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: nutrition lab, post-mortem care, personal hygiene and oral care, isolation principles, safe patient handling, safe restraint use, fire safety, nursing process lab:, aazards of immobility, abnormal assessment, pulmonary hygiene, oxygen therapy, nebulizer and peak flow meter, Incision and wound care, orthopedic care
    • Simulation: domestic violence; patient with swallowing impairment
    • Clinical focus: long-term care and rehabilitation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 2810 - Pharmacology I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the effects of drugs on physiologic systems. Students learn about specific drug mechanisms of action, administration issues, required safety monitoring, potential adverse effects, drug interactions, and evaluation for achievement of therapeutic effectiveness and drug-related patient education needs. Drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system, immune system, cardiovascular system, hematopoietic systems, coagulation pathways, fluid and electrolyte balance, cancer treatment, and alternative therapies are discussed. (prereq: NU students: BI 1010  (C grade), BI 1020  (C grade), BI 1030  (C grade), BI 2040  (C grade),MA 125  or MA 1204 ); BME students: BI 2305 , BI 2315 ) (coreq: NU 290 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the major categories of drug reactions and describe the nurse’s role in preventing, detecting, responding to, and reporting adverse drug reactions (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Use knowledge of the basic principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics to explain the concepts of drug mechanism of action; onset, peak, and duration of action; adverse effects profile; and potential for drug-to-drug, drug-to-food, and drug-to-disease interactions (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Use knowledge of the physiologic changes that occur during human development to explain how age and developmental status influence drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Identify mechanisms of action, therapeutic indications, and expected responses to drugs that affect the immune, autonomic nervous, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, and coagulation systems, fluid and electrolyte balances, and drugs to treat cancer (Level 1, Nursing Care)
    • Use core drug knowledge and critical thinking in conjunction with the nursing process to describe safe administration of medications and methods to evaluate effectiveness of drug therapy (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Use effective communication skills and knowledge of adverse effects profile to monitor drug safety and educate clients about drugs that affect the immune, autonomic nervous, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, and coagulation systems, fluid and electrolyte balances, and drugs to treat cancer (Level 2, Communication)
    • Discuss methods to promote open communication between clients and health care providers about alternative therapies, sources of accurate information, and controversy surrounding use (Level 2, Communication)
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Acknowledge the importance of accessing current and reliable sources to maintain and update one’s knowledge of drugs over the course of a nursing career (Level 2, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3, and 4
    • College Algebra 1 or Quantitative Reasoning

    Course Topics
    • Drug development, regulation, and safety issues
    • Pharmacology and the nursing process
    • Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics
    • Adverse drug reactions
    • Food and drug Interactions
    • Immunizations, immunosuppressants & glucocorticoid drugs
    • Anti-inflammatory drugs
    • Anti-histamines drugs
    • Drug therapy across the lifespan
    • Alternative therapies
    • Adrenergic agonist and blocker drugs
    • Cholinergic agonist and blocker drugs
    • Cholinesterase inhibitor drugs
    • Short and long acting paralytic drugs
    • Drugs affecting fluid & electrolyte balance
    • Drug to treat hypertension
    • Vasodilators
    • Drugs for congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, and myocardial infarction
    • Drugs for dyslipidemias
    • Anti-coagulants
    • Drugs for anemias & hematopoietic drugs
    • Cancer chemotherapy

    Coordinator
    Catherine Leffler
  
  • NU 2820 - Pharmacology II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the second in a two-part series on the effects of drugs on physiological systems. The course focus is on critical thinking in the application of pharmacological knowledge to nursing practice. Students identify nursing implications necessary to administer medications and monitor the pharmacological response of medication to clients across the life span. Students demonstrate and apply medication administration principles in lab and simulation activities. Drugs affecting the respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, central nervous system, women’s and men’s health, bone and joint disorders, and antimicrobials are discussed. (prereq: NU 2810 ) (coreq: NU 2520 , NU 391 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify mechanisms of action, therapeutic indications, and expected responses of antimicrobial drugs, drugs that affect the respiratory, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, and drugs affecting men and women’s health (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Use core drug knowledge and critical thinking in conjunction with the nursing process to demonstrate safe administration of medications and methods to evaluate effectiveness of drug therapy within laboratory setting (Level 2, Critical Thinking)
    • Apply the nursing process to medication management including demonstration of safe medication administration and evaluation of client responses to pharmacological interventions within simulated medication administration scenarios (Level 2, Nursing Care and Critical Thinking)
    • Use effective communication skills and knowledge of adverse effects profile to monitor drug safety and educate clients about antimicrobial drugs, drugs that affect the respiratory, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, and drugs affecting men and women’s health (Level 2, Communication)    
    • Accept personal responsibility and participate in own development toward the role of the professional nurse through acts of integrity, mutual respect, and actively seeking out opportunities to learn (Level 2, Professional Role)
    • Use current and reliable sources to maintain and update one’s knowledge of drugs over the course of a nursing career (Level 2, Evidence-Based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Chemotherapy of infectious agents
    • Gastrointestinal tract drugs
    • Endocrine drugs
    • Diabetes management drugs
    • Neurodegenerative drugs
    • Anesthetic and pain management
    • Neurologic drugs
    • Drug abuse treatment drugs
    • Psychiatric drugs
    • Respiratory tracts drugs
    • Bone and joint disorder drugs
    • Women’s health drugs
    • Men’s health drugs

    Laboratory Topics
    • Oral medication administration
    • Injectable and transdermal medication administration
    • Eye and ear medication administration
    • Individual student practice of medication administration
    • Blood sugar monitoring and insulin administration
    • Pain management and nursing process
    • Anticoagulant therapy management
    • Metered dose inhaler and respiratory management

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 3000 - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I

    4 lecture hours 9 lab hours 7 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver a caring approach to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. (prereq: NU 2320 , NU 260 , NU 2520 , NU 2820 , NU 391 , SS 462 ) (coreq: NU 3000L , HU 332 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care) 
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Gather and organize data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions to promote patient safety and improve patient care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate effective teamwork, while developing skills in delegation and coordination of client care with other members of the healthcare team (Level 3, Collaboration)  
    • Select and apply evidence from reliable sources to support the plan of care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)  

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Postpartum client
    • Newborn client
    • Postoperative client
    • Acute pain and coping
    • Transition to parenthood
    • Normal childbearing
    • Alteration in urinary function
    • Preoperative and intraoperative client
    • Fluid and electrolyte imbalance
    • Ineffective airway clearance
    • Ineffective breathing pattern
    • Ineffective thermoregulation
    • Hypo- and hyperglycemia
    • Impaired tissue integrity
    • Preconception care
    • Genetics and genomics in the childbearing family
    • Contraceptive counseling
    • Prenatal care
    • Perinatal infection
    • Childbearing at risk
    • Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders
    • Families experiencing perinatal loss

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of laboring mom, care of patient post-cesarean section, care of patient with post-partum hemorrhage
    • Clinical focus: maternal/newborn and acute medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Klug
  
  • NU 3000C - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I

    0 lecture hours 9 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver a caring approach to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. (prereq: NU 2320 , NU 260, NU 2520, NU 2820, NU 391, SS 462. NU 3000D  must be a prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 3000L, HU 332)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care) 
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Gather and organize data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions to promote patient safety and improve patient care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate effective teamwork, while developing skills in delegation and coordination of client care with other members of the healthcare team (Level 3, Collaboration)  
    • Select and apply evidence from reliable sources to support the plan of care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice) 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Postpartum client
    • Newborn client
    • Postoperative client
    • Acute pain and coping
    • Transition to parenthood
    • Normal childbearing
    • Alteration in urinary function
    • Preoperative and intraoperative client
    • Fluid and electrolyte imbalance
    • Ineffective airway clearance
    • Ineffective breathing pattern
    • Ineffective thermoregulation
    • Hypo- and hyperglycemia
    • Impaired tissue integrity
    • Preconception care
    • Genetics and genomics in the childbearing family
    • Contraceptive counseling
    • Prenatal care
    • Perinatal infection
    • Childbearing at risk
    • Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders
    • Families experiencing perinatal loss

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of laboring mom, care of patient post-cesarean section, care of patient with post-partum hemorrhage
    • Clinical focus: maternal/newborn and acute medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Klug
  
  • NU 3000D - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver a caring approach to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. (prereq:  NU 2320 , NU 260, NU 2520, NU 2820, NU 391, SS 462) (coreq: NU 3000L, HU 332)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care) 
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Gather and organize data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions to promote patient safety and improve patient care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate effective teamwork, while developing skills in delegation and coordination of client care with other members of the healthcare team (Level 3, Collaboration)  
    • Select and apply evidence from reliable sources to support the plan of care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice) 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Postpartum client
    • Newborn client
    • Postoperative client
    • Acute pain and coping
    • Transition to parenthood
    • Normal childbearing
    • Alteration in urinary function
    • Preoperative and intraoperative client
    • Fluid and electrolyte imbalance
    • Ineffective airway clearance
    • Ineffective breathing pattern
    • Ineffective thermoregulation
    • Hypo- and hyperglycemia
    • Impaired tissue integrity
    • Preconception care
    • Genetics and genomics in the childbearing family
    • Contraceptive counseling
    • Prenatal care
    • Perinatal infection
    • Childbearing at risk
    • Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders
    • Families experiencing perinatal loss

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of laboring mom, care of patient post-cesarean section, care of patient with post-partum hemorrhage
    • Clinical focus: maternal/newborn and acute medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Klug
  
  • NU 3000L - Application of Psychomotor Skills I

    0 lecture hours 3 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This lab course provides students with the knowledge and skill for development and application of psychomotor skills. Students develop confidence and skill proficiency through deliberate and repetitive practice. Major emphasis is placed on quality and safety and current evidence for best practices in performing skills and procedures. As part of the progression in psychomotor skill development, students receive supportive and constructive feedback on their performance.  (prereq: NU 2520 ) (coreq: NU 3000 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate psychomotor skills and procedures safely, efficiently, and compassionately in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Develop psychomotor skill and procedure proficiency through practice in facilitated open lab hours (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach while incorporating constructive feedback to further develop skill proficiency (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Use effective verbal, written, and electronic communication skills when performing and documenting psychomotor skills in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect. (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Operate biomedical technologies with increasing proficiency to support safe and quality nursing care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Explain evidence-based rationale for critical elements of nursing skills and procedures (Level 3, Evidence-Based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • IV insertion and IV removal
    • IV push medication administration
    • Urinary catheter insertion and removal (indwelling)
    • Trach care and trach suctioning
    • Introduction to acute care
    • IV therapy
    • Urinary drainage
    • Oxygen therapy
    • Surgical and medical asepsis
    • Incision and wound care
    • Pulmonary hygiene

    Coordinator
    Dawn Wojtkiewicz-Hudzinski
  
  • NU 3100 - Principles of Electrocardiograph (ECG) Interpretation & Monitoring

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the essential information needed to interpret normal and abnormal rhythm strips, differentiate lethal from non-lethal ECG rhythms, and appropriately select pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Technology used in monitoring cardiac rhythms is explored from design and end-user perspectives. This course is co-taught by nursing and biomedical faculty. Current pharmacology for treatment of cardiac dysrhythmias is addressed. Simulation technology is incorporated into course providing students with real time rhythm identification and treatment. (prereq: consent of instructor or NU 2820 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify pertinent anatomy, physiology and electrophysiological principles of cardiac conduction (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Interpret normal and abnormal cardiac rhythms including sinus node, atrial, junctional, ventricular dysrhythmias, and bundle branch blocks (Level 2, Nursing Care)
    • Identify characteristic ECG patterns associated with myocardial ischemia, injury, and infarct (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Identify and treat ECG alternations related to electrolytes imbalances and toxic drug effects (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Differentiate purpose of 12 lead ECG from telemetry ECG monitoring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Articulate client physiological signs, symptoms, and consequences associated with abnormal cardiac rhythms (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Integrate pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment decisions appropriate to dysrhythmia (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Apply principles of ECG technology and treatment options to clinical case presentations (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Identify different types and sources of ECG artifact and measures to control (Level 3, Technology).
    • Select most appropriate lead configuration for ECG monitoring considering client situation (Level 3, Technology)
    • Describe defibrillation and cardiac pacing principles as well as safety implications (Level 3, Technology)
    • Identify ECG technological limitations from design and user point of reference (Level 3, Technology)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Anatomy and electrophysiology of the heart
    • Pharmacological therapy
    • Principles of ECG analysis and monitoring
    • Clinical aspects of sinus dysrhythmias
    • Clinical aspects of atrial dysrhythmias
    • Clinical aspects of junctional dysrhythmias
    • Clinical aspects of ventricular dysrhythmias
    • Clinical aspects of AV heart blocks dysrhythmias
    • 12 lead ECG, pacemaker, principles of defibrillation and synchronized defibrillation
    • ECG and electrolyte imbalances
    • ECG changes with myocardial ischemia and infarction

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ruth Widder
  
  • NU 3200 - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II

    3 lecture hours 9 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    This course expands on students’ abilities to integrate the nursing process with clients across the life span with episodic health challenges. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 3000 , NU 3000L ) (coreq: NU 3200L )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, and individualized care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the nursing process to clients experiencing episodic alteration in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Critical Thinking) 
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills while interacting with clients, families, and peers in a professional and respectful manner (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of a nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role) 
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of patient at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of patient with chest tubes
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with Impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal Injury and trauma: fractures; application of traction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations
    • Professional role - collaboration and delegation
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Care of client with alteration in GI motility (constipation, diarrhea, irritable bowel disease)
    • Sexual dysfunction - men and women
    • Care of the client with Impaired verbal communication

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of the child
    • Clinical focus: medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aruna Lal
  
  • NU 3200C - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II

    0 lecture hours 9 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course expands on students’ abilities to integrate the nursing process with clients across the life span with episodic health challenges. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 3000, NU 3000L. NU 3200D  must be a prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 3200L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, and individualized care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the nursing process to clients experiencing episodic alteration in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Critical Thinking) 
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills while interacting with clients, families, and peers in a professional and respectful manner (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of a nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role) 
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of patient at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of patient with chest tubes
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with Impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal Injury and trauma: fractures; application of traction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations
    • Professional role - collaboration and delegation
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Care of client with alteration in GI motility (constipation, diarrhea, irritable bowel disease)
    • Sexual dysfunction - men and women
    • Care of the client with Impaired verbal communication

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of the child
    • Clinical focus: medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aruna Lal
  
  • NU 3200D - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course expands on students’ abilities to integrate the nursing process with clients across the life span with episodic health challenges. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 3000, NU 3000L) (coreq: NU 3200L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, and individualized care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills when applying the nursing process to clients experiencing episodic alteration in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Critical Thinking) 
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills while interacting with clients, families, and peers in a professional and respectful manner (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of a nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role) 
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of patient at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of patient with chest tubes
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with Impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal Injury and trauma: fractures; application of traction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations
    • Professional role - collaboration and delegation
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Care of client with alteration in GI motility (constipation, diarrhea, irritable bowel disease)
    • Sexual dysfunction - men and women
    • Care of the client with Impaired verbal communication

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: care of the child
    • Clinical focus: medical/surgical

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aruna Lal
  
  • NU 3200L - Application of Psychomotor Skills II

    0 lecture hours 3 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This lab course provides students with the knowledge and skill for development and application of psychomotor skills. Students develop confidence and skill proficiency through deliberate and repetitive practice. Major emphasis is placed on quality and safety and current evidence for best practices in performing skills and procedures. As part of the progression in psychomotor skill development, students receive supportive and constructive feedback on their performance.  (prereq: NU 3000 , NU 3000L ) (coreq: NU 3200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate psychomotor skills and procedures safely, efficiently, and compassionately in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Develop psychomotor skill and procedure proficiency through practice in facilitated open lab hours (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach while incorporating constructive feedback to further develop skill proficiency (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Use effective verbal, written, and electronic communication skills when performing and documenting psychomotor skills in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect. (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Operate biomedical technologies with increasing proficiency to support safe and quality nursing care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Explain evidence-based rationale for critical elements of nursing skills and procedures (Level 3, Evidence-Based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • Care of med/surg patient
    • Nasogastric tube (NG) insertion and removal (salum sump)
    • Central venous access device (CVAD) site care
    • Bowel management
    • Ostomy management
    • Nasogastric and feeding tube insertion and gastric decompression
    • Enteral nutrition
    • Orthopedic care
    • Blood administration
    • Chest tube management
    • Total parenteral nutrition

    Coordinator
    Dawn Wojtkiewicz-Hudzinski
  
  • NU 3302 - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Episodic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 12 lab hours 8 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver caring approaches to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 2521 , NU 391 , NU 2820 )  (coreq: NU 3302L )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care)   
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Care of the newborn and newborn thermoregulation
    • Preconception, prenatal, perinatal, and postpartum care
    • Normal childbearing
    • Childbearing at risk
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Genetics and genomics in childbearing families
    • Care of clients and risk for situational depression: post-partum depression, prenatal loss, adjustment to traumatic injury and chronic illness
    • Care of the client with hypo/hyperglycemia
    • Care of the client with impaired verbal communication
    • Electrolyte imbalances
    • Fluid volume deficit and excess
    • Nutritional Imbalances
    • Ineffective breathing patterns
    • Acute pain
    • Altered urinary elimination
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of clients at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal injury and trauma: fractures; application of rraction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: post-partum simulation, care of laboring mom; care of the child 
    • Clinical focus: maternal newborn, surgical

    Coordinator
    Catherine Leffler
  
  • NU 3302C - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Episodic Health Challenges

    0 lecture hours 12 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver caring approaches to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 2521, NU 391, NU 2820. NU 3302D  must be prereq or taken concurrently)  (coreq: NU 3302L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care)   
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of the newborn and newborn thermoregulation
    • Preconception, prenatal, perinatal, and postpartum care
    • Normal childbearing
    • Childbearing at risk
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Genetics and genomics in childbearing families
    • Care of clients and risk for situational depression: post-partum depression, prenatal loss, adjustment to traumatic injury and chronic illness
    • Care of the client with hypo/hyperglycemia
    • Care of the client with impaired verbal communication
    • Electrolyte imbalances
    • Fluid volume deficit and excess
    • Nutritional Imbalances
    • Ineffective breathing patterns
    • Acute pain
    • Altered urinary elimination
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of clients at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal injury and trauma: fractures; application of rraction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: post-partum simulation, care of laboring mom; care of the child 
    • Clinical focus: maternal newborn, surgical

    Coordinator
    Catherine Leffler
  
  • NU 3302D - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Episodic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the opportunity to expand their use of the nursing process in the care of patients and families experiencing episodic health care challenges. Students apply nursing concepts in providing care to patients and childbearing families. Students expand their role as members of the health care team and use effective communication to deliver caring approaches to diverse populations across the lifespan. Further development of critical thinking skills enables students to identify and act on opportunities to prevent complications and promote, maintain, and restore health. Students continue to explore all dimensions of health with an emphasis on developing collaborative skills. (prereq: NU 2521, NU 391, NU 2820) (coreq: NU 3302L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use the nursing process to organize, prioritize, and deliver safe, effective, holistic, individualized care to clients experiencing acute episodic health challenge in a way that promotes health and prevents complications (Level 3, Nursing Care)   
    • Act on opportunities to apply aspects of caring by comforting and supporting clients and families in conjunction with reflection on one’s approach to caring (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Prioritize the nutritional needs of clients requiring special dietary therapy to create an individualized teaching plan (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking and thoughtful, reflective analysis to make accurate clinical decisions that individualize the delivery of nursing care (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Employ effective interpersonal communication skills and knowledge of health education principles to educate, support, and partner with diverse clients and families to promote achieving higher levels of health (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Assume the role of the nurse as provider of care, educator, advocate, and care coordinator by reflecting on and taking responsibility for one’s action, practice, and learning (Level 3, Professional Role)  
    • Use health information technology and biomedical technology to monitor, deliver, and support clinical decisions for safe client care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate increasing skills to effectively delegate the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select and analyze evidence from nursing research and relevant professional literature to develop a plan of care for clients experiencing episodic alterations in health and/or wellness (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of the newborn and newborn thermoregulation
    • Preconception, prenatal, perinatal, and postpartum care
    • Normal childbearing
    • Childbearing at risk
    • The impact of hospitalization on children, adults, and families
    • Genetics and genomics in childbearing families
    • Care of clients and risk for situational depression: post-partum depression, prenatal loss, adjustment to traumatic injury and chronic illness
    • Care of the client with hypo/hyperglycemia
    • Care of the client with impaired verbal communication
    • Electrolyte imbalances
    • Fluid volume deficit and excess
    • Nutritional Imbalances
    • Ineffective breathing patterns
    • Acute pain
    • Altered urinary elimination
    • Care of patients with altered level of consciousness; (metabolic and structural)
    • Care of the patient with acute confusion
    • Care of client with acute neurological injury and spinal cord Injury 
    • Care of clients at risk for and actively experiencing seizure activity
    • Nursing care of patients requiring enteral and parenteral nutrition
    • Care of the patient undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery
    • Care of patients with impaired oxygenation, gas exchange, and acid/base imbalances
    • Care of patients receiving blood transfusion
    • Care of patients with Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD)
    • Care of child and adults with episodic and acute respiratory conditions (acute pulmonary embolus, tuberculous, epiglottitis, acute bronchitis, pneumothorax)
    • Care of the patient with muscular-skeletal injury and trauma: fractures; application of rraction (skin and skeletal); hip and knee joint replacements; amputations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Simulations: post-partum simulation, care of laboring mom; care of the child 
    • Clinical focus: maternal newborn, surgical

    Coordinator
    Catherine Leffler
  
  • NU 3302L - Application of Psychomotor Skills (ASD)

    0 lecture hours 3 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This lab course provides students with the knowledge and skills for development and application of psychomotor skills. Students develop confidence and skill proficiency through deliberate and repetitive practice. Major emphasis is placed on quality and safety and current evidence for best practices in performing skills and procedures. As part of the progression in psychomotor skill development, students receive supportive and constructive feedback on their performance.  (prereq: NU 2521 ) (coreq: NU 3302 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate psychomotor skills and procedures safely, efficiently, and compassionately in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Develop psychomotor skill and procedure proficiency through practice in facilitated open lab hours (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Critically reflect on one’s approach while incorporating constructive feedback to further develop skill proficiency (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Use effective verbal, written, and electronic communication skills when performing and documenting psychomotor skills in the nursing laboratory environment (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect. (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Operate biomedical technologies with increasing proficiency to support safe and quality nursing care (Level 3, Technology)
    • Explain evidence-based rationale for critical elements of nursing skills and procedures (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • IV Insertion and IV removal
    • IV push medication administration
    • Urinary catheter insertion and removal (indwelling)
    • Trach care and trach suctioning
    • IV therapy
    • Urinary drainage
    • Peri-operative care - surgical and medical asepsis
    • Nasogastric tube (NG) insertion and removal (salum sump)
    • Central Venous Access Device (CVAD) site care
    • Nasogastric and feeding tube insertion and gastric decompression
    • Enteral nutrition
    • Orthopedic care
    • Blood administration
    • Total parenteral nutrition

    Coordinator
    Dawn Wojtkiewicz-Hudzinski
  
  • NU 3320 - Complementary and Integrative Health Therapies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This interdisciplinary course examines the principles, practices, use, and outcomes of complementary and integrative health therapies. This course focuses on evidence-based practice related to alternative healing practices. Critical thinking and therapeutic communication within the scope of professional nursing practice are emphasized. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Incorporate integrative therapies into clinical practice to clients across the lifespan to restore, maintain, and/or promote health and wellness (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Identify psychological, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of complementary and integrative health therapies (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Discuss the history, cultural context, and current use of complementary and integrative health therapies (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze the role of the health professional in relation to clients’ knowledge and use of complementary and integrative health therapies (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Analyze the empirical, theoretical, and scientific basis of selected complementary and integrative health therapies (Level 3, Evidence-Based Practice)
    • Evaluate efficacy, outcomes, cost effectiveness, and client satisfaction related to use of evidence-based complementary and integrative health therapies (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • History of aromatherapy and integrative health
    • Massage therapy techniques
    • Healing environments
    • Health and human spirit
    • Biofeedback and stress management
    • Integrative nutrition and herbs
    • Energy healing and healing touch
    • Pet therapy
    • Music therapy
    • Aromatherapy

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 3400 - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges

    3 lecture hours 6 lab hours 5 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. (prereq: NU 390 , NU 3200 , NU 3200L )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prioritize the delivery of safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care to clients with emphasis on restoration of health and/or wellness in clients with chronic health concerns (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills that individualize the nursing care for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills when providing health education for clients experiencing chronic health concerns and their families (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Integrate selected components of the professional role into the delivery of nursing care inclusive of the role of educator, advocate, and coordinator of care (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Analyze data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate collaborative skills in delegating and supervising the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select, discriminate, and apply evidence from professional literature when discussing, planning, and delivering nursing care to clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Health perception/health management pattern; self-perception/self-concept pattern: chronicity and disability
    • Health perception/health management pattern; role-relationship pattern: quality of Life (QOL) 
    • Health perception/health management pattern: rehabilitation nursing
    • Role/relationship pattern: hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Cognitive/perceptual pattern: chronic pain across the Lifespan
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care across the lifespan for clients with disuse syndrome and hazards of immobility
    • Sexual/reproductive pattern: chronic illness and sexuality
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of adults experiencing TIAs, CVA, and unilateral neglect
    • Activity/exercise pattern: asthma across the lifespan
    • Health perception/health management pattern: adherence/health management and maintenance
    • Health perception/health management pattern: complementary and integrative health (alternative) medicine (CAM)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with sensory and perceptual alterations (vision, hearing, tactile, etc.) (2 hours)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with Alzheimer’s dementia
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care and chronicity of children and adults with type 1 and 2 diabetes (2 hours)
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care of children and adults with musculoskeletal and articular dysfunction (2 hours)
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care of child with altered growth and development (G&D), Autism, ADDH, pervasive behavior disorders
    • Health perception/health management pattern: care of the client experiencing self-care deficit (self-management) and impaired home management
    • Role/relationship pattern: family response and family caregiving related to chronic Illness
    • Health perception/health management pattern: discharge planning, case management, home care

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills list: sensory perceptual lab 
    • Simulations: care of pediatric patient with respiratory/neurological disorders
    • Clinical focus: inpatient chronic health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 3400C - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges

    0 lecture hours 6 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. (prereq: NU 390, NU 3200, NU 3200L. NU 3400D  must be a prereq or taken concurrently)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prioritize the delivery of safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care to clients with emphasis on restoration of health and/or wellness in clients with chronic health concerns (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills that individualize the nursing care for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills when providing health education for clients experiencing chronic health concerns and their families (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Integrate selected components of the professional role into the delivery of nursing care inclusive of the role of educator, advocate, and coordinator of care (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Analyze data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate collaborative skills in delegating and supervising the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select, discriminate, and apply evidence from professional literature when discussing, planning, and delivering nursing care to clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Health perception/health management pattern; self-perception/self-concept pattern: chronicity and disability
    • Health perception/health management pattern; role-relationship pattern: quality of Life (QOL) 
    • Health perception/health management pattern: rehabilitation nursing
    • Role/relationship pattern: hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Cognitive/perceptual pattern: chronic pain across the Lifespan
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care across the lifespan for clients with disuse syndrome and hazards of immobility
    • Sexual/reproductive pattern: chronic illness and sexuality
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of adults experiencing TIAs, CVA, and unilateral neglect
    • Activity/exercise pattern: asthma across the lifespan
    • Health perception/health management pattern: adherence/health management and maintenance
    • Health perception/health management pattern: complementary and integrative health (alternative) medicine (CAM)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with sensory and perceptual alterations (vision, hearing, tactile, etc.) (2 hours)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with Alzheimer’s dementia
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care and chronicity of children and adults with type 1 and 2 diabetes (2 hours)
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care of children and adults with musculoskeletal and articular dysfunction (2 hours)
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care of child with altered growth and development (G&D), Autism, ADDH, pervasive behavior disorders
    • Health perception/health management pattern: care of the client experiencing self-care deficit (self-management) and impaired home management
    • Role/relationship pattern: family response and family caregiving related to chronic Illness
    • Health perception/health management pattern: discharge planning, case management, home care

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills list: sensory perceptual lab 
    • Simulations: care of pediatric patient with respiratory/neurological disorders
    • Clinical focus: inpatient chronic health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 3400D - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. (prereq: NU 390, NU 3200, NU 3200L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prioritize the delivery of safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care to clients with emphasis on restoration of health and/or wellness in clients with chronic health concerns (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Use reflective analysis to develop critical thinking skills that individualize the nursing care for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills when providing health education for clients experiencing chronic health concerns and their families (Level 3, Communication)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Integrate selected components of the professional role into the delivery of nursing care inclusive of the role of educator, advocate, and coordinator of care (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Analyze data from health information technology and biomedical technology and use findings to support clinical decisions for clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Technology)
    • Demonstrate collaborative skills in delegating and supervising the delivery of nursing care to other health team members in clinical, laboratory, and classroom settings (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Select, discriminate, and apply evidence from professional literature when discussing, planning, and delivering nursing care to clients experiencing chronic health concerns (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Health perception/health management pattern; self-perception/self-concept pattern: chronicity and disability
    • Health perception/health management pattern; role-relationship pattern: quality of Life (QOL) 
    • Health perception/health management pattern: rehabilitation nursing
    • Role/relationship pattern: hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Cognitive/perceptual pattern: chronic pain across the Lifespan
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care across the lifespan for clients with disuse syndrome and hazards of immobility
    • Sexual/reproductive pattern: chronic illness and sexuality
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of adults experiencing TIAs, CVA, and unilateral neglect
    • Activity/exercise pattern: asthma across the lifespan
    • Health perception/health management pattern: adherence/health management and maintenance
    • Health perception/health management pattern: complementary and integrative health (alternative) medicine (CAM)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with sensory and perceptual alterations (vision, hearing, tactile, etc.) (2 hours)
    • Cognitive-perceptual pattern: care of client with Alzheimer’s dementia
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care and chronicity of children and adults with type 1 and 2 diabetes (2 hours)
    • Activity/exercise pattern: care of children and adults with musculoskeletal and articular dysfunction (2 hours)
    • Nutrition/metabolic pattern: care of child with altered growth and development (G&D), Autism, ADDH, pervasive behavior disorders
    • Health perception/health management pattern: care of the client experiencing self-care deficit (self-management) and impaired home management
    • Role/relationship pattern: family response and family caregiving related to chronic Illness
    • Health perception/health management pattern: discharge planning, case management, home care

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills list: sensory perceptual lab 
    • Simulations: care of pediatric patient with respiratory/neurological disorders
    • Clinical focus: inpatient chronic health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Victoria Carlson-Oehlers
  
  • NU 3600 - Nursing Care of the Community

    4 lecture hours 6 lab hours 6 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the community as client. The emphasis in this course is the use of the nursing process in partnership with communities for improving health. Students apply systems, change, and epidemiological theories to promote health in selected community settings. Students explore political activism as a role of the professional nurse. Issues relevant to population-based nursing care and societal trends that influence community health are discussed. (prereq: NU 390 , NU 3200  or NU 3302 , NU 3200L  or NU 3302L )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Incorporate community and population-based theories and frameworks when caring for the community as the client (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Complete a comprehensive community assessment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze the influence of nurses as advocates for development of health policy (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Explore societal trends and ways communities have historically responded to health issues (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Create and conduct a seminar depicting a selected vulnerable population (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Implement the professional nursing roles of advocate, educator, and change agent when delivering nursing care to a selected community (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Differentiate definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing that reflect the community as client (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Collaborate with community partners to promote the health of a selected community (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Apply epidemiological approaches and best practices for population-based health care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Community assessment data
    • Community theory
    • Epidemiology and application to community Health
    • Nursing process: analysis of community assessment data
    • Population centered nursing population-based nursing practice: The intervention wheel
    • Power, policy and politics
    • Public and community health nursing, health care systems, and community finances
    • Health literacy
    • Global health
    • Program management for community health
    • Legal Issues in public health:
    • Communicable disease management
    • Ethical issues and community health
    • Introduction to vulnerability
    • Genomics in public health nursing
    • Change theory
    • Health for all: healthiest Wisconsin
    • Communities in crisis- disaster care
    • Community violence
    • Environmental health

    Coordinator
    Robin Gates
 

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