Feb 23, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Actuarial Science

  
  • AC 1103 - Introduction to Actuarial Science

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the Actuarial Science profession. The course topics includes basics of set theory, combinatorics, and various facets of the Actuarial profession. Actuaries from different companies in the area make presentations to class. In addition, students shadow actuaries at different companies for a day or two to observe a day of an actuary. (prereq: AS student or consent of program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know all the details about the two major actuarial societies which is controlling the actuarial science profession: Society of Actuaries and Casualty Actuary Society
    • Know the importance of the professional exams in finding jobs as an actaury in the insurance industry and finding internships (which is also required for finding a job) and learn how important it is to prepare for them in a timely manner
    • Learn the difference between the casulaty actuaries, health insurance actuaries, pention actuaries and life insurance actuaries, so that they can make a more educated decision when they look for an internship and later for a job
    • Know what a typical day of an actuary at work look like by shadowing actuaries in different areas of actuarial profession
    • Know combination, permutation and other fundamental counting techniques
    • Know general properties of sets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Precalculus material

    Course Topics
    • Combinatorics
    • Set theory

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz
  
  • AC 2303 - AS Lab I: Applications of Probability

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the applications of the probability concepts and theory that students learned in MA 2630  and MA 2631 . The students will apply the tools they learned in these two probability courses to problems encountered in actuarial science for assessing risk.  (prereq: MA 2631 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Calculate probabilities of mutually exclusive events
    • Calculate probabilities using addition and multiplication rules
    • Calculate probabilities using combinations and permutations
    • Calculate conditional probabilities
    • Use Bayes theorem to calculate probabilities
    • Apply probability mass, probability density, and cumulative distribution functions
    • Calculate expected value, mode, median, variance, and standard deviation
    • Calculate probabilities using probability generating and moment generating functions
    • Perform calculations concerning joint probability and probability density functions, and cumulative distribution functions
    • Determine conditional and marginal probability and probability density functions, cumulative distribution functions
    • Calculate moments for joint, conditional and marginal random variables
    • Apply joint moment generating functions
    • Calculate variance and standard deviation for conditional and marginal probability distributions
    • Calculate joint moments, such as covariance and correlation coefficient

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Combinatorial probability
    • Probability rules 
    • Conditional probability
    • Total probability law and Bayes theorem
    • Discrete random variables
    • Binomial, Poisson, geometric, and other discrete distributions
    • Continuous random variables
    • Normal, chi-Square, t-distribution and other continuous distributions
    • Mixed random variables
    • Marginal distribution
    • Moment generating functions
    • Measures of central tendency and dispersion

    Course Topics
    • Application of probabilities of mutually exclusive events
    • Applications of probabilities using addition and multiplication rules
    • Applications of probabilities using combinations and permutations
    • Applications of conditional probabilities
    • Applications of Bayes theorem to calculate probabilities
    • Probability mass, probability density, and cumulative distribution function applications
    • Applications of expected value, mode, median, variance and standard deviation
    • Calculate probabilities using probability generating and moment generating functions
    • Applications of joint probability and probability density functions and cumulative distribution functions
    • Applications of conditional and marginal probability and probability density functions, cumulative distribution functions
    • Applications of moments for joint, conditional, and marginal random variables
    • Applications of variance and standard deviation for conditional and marginal probability distributions
    • Applications of joint moments, such as covariance and correlation coefficient

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz
  
  • AC 3204 - Quantitative Risk Management

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is a fundamental course on quantitative risk management. The major concepts and ideas from modern risk management will be explained and illustrated. The course builds upon general theory of risk measures and performance measures and addresses the current development in financial markets. (prereq: MA 2410  and MA 2631  or program director’s consent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Employ the basic principles of financial pricing in complete markets
    • Understand and implement the basic principles of quantitative risk management such as measuring the risk and measuring the performance of financial positions
    • Exploit the role of choosing a particular risk measure or performance measure to monitor the overall risk profile of a financial position or financial institution
    • Utilize various mathematical techniques for modeling portfolio value
    • Understand the mathematical concepts in defining a risk measure or a performance measure
    • Apply the above quantitative risk management methodologies to market data

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Algebra
    • Statistics
    • Probability

    Course Topics
    • Basic concepts in valuation of financial positions
    • Basic concepts in risk management
    • Modeling portfolio value and its change
    • Theory of risk and performance measures
    • Applications

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yu-Sin Chang
  
  • AC 3303 - AS Lab II: Applications of Financial Mathematics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the core mathematical concepts included on the syllabus for the actuarial exams on financial mathematics (Exam FM offered by the Society of Actuaries and Exam 2 offered by the Causality Actuarial Society). It will review and/or cover topics such as time value of money, annuities, loans, bonds, cash flow and portfolios, immunization, interest rate swaps, and determinants of interest rates. Substantial focus will also be placed on developing efficient problem-solving skills.  (prereq: MA 390 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of financial mathematics
    • Demonstrate an ability to efficiently apply these concepts in calculating present and accumulated values for various streams of cash flows as a basis for use in: reserving, valuation, pricing, asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting, and valuing contingent cash flows
    • Successfully complete the actuarial exam

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • General cash flows and portfolios
    • Immunization
    • General derivatives
    • Options
    • Hedging and investment strategies
    • Forwards and futures
    • Swaps

    Course Topics
    • Time value of money
    • Annuities/cash flows with non-contingent payments
    • Loans
    • Bonds
    • General cash flows and portfolios
    • Immunization
    • Interest rate swaps
    • Determinants of interest rates

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz
  
  • AC 3414 - Linear Models and Predictive Analytics

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed for actuarial science majors to provide them a solid statistical foundation. This course will cover topics that are not included in MA 2410  and MA 2411 . It will introduce the theory and practical application of linear models and predictive analytics techniques, which are commonly used for insurance modeling work.  (prereq: MA 2410  and MA 2631  and (MA 232  or MA 2323 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Employ fundamental exploratory data analysis on data
    • Use appropriate linear models such as generalized linear models and generalized additive models for analyzing the data.
    • Understand the key concepts of dimension reduction using principal components analysis 
    • Apply predictive analytics techniques on real-life problems
    • Use R or other statistical software to solve a problem in topics covered in this course
    • Interpret results for various linear models and predictive analytics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus (single variable and multivariable)
    • Probability theory and application
    • Statistics

    Course Topics
    • Explanatory data analysis
    • Generalized linear model
    • Generalized additive models
    • Principle component analysis
    • Penalized regression
    • Decision tree and cluster analysis

    Coordinator
    Dr. Won Chul Song
  
  • AC 4204 - Investment and Financial Markets

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of the sequence of two courses to prepare our students for Exam IFM of the Society of Actuaries. This course is to develop the student’s knowledge of certain actuarial models and the application of those models to insurance and other financial risks. (prereq: AC 3303 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the assumptions of mean-variance portfolio theory and its principal results
    • Understand different methods for the valuation of asset portfolios and explain their appropriateness in different situations
    • Understand the notion of efficient markets and explain why market participants may make irrational systematic errors, leading to market inefficiencies
    • Understand different ways to measure investment risk and conduct project analysis using advanced techniques used in capital budgeting
    • Understand the factors that a company has to consider when deciding its capital structure
    • Understand how forward contracts and futures contracts can be used in conjunction with the underlying asset in a risk management context
    • Understand how call options and put options can be used in conjunction with the underlying asset inn a risk management context

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus
    • Probability
    • Basic corporate finance 
    • Interest theory

    Course Topics
    • Mean-variance portfolio theory
    • Asset pricing models
    • Market efficiency and behavioral finance
    • Investment risk and project analysis
    • Capital structure
    • Introductory derivatives-forwards and futures
    • General properties of options

    Coordinator
    Dr. Brandon Reid
  
  • AC 4303 - AS Lab III: Applications of Investment and Financial Markets

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the second in the sequence of two courses offered to prepare students for Exam IFM of the Society of Actuaries. This course will cover the topics that are not covered in AC 4204 and will also cover applications of all the concepts taught in AC 4204 and at the beginning of this course. (prereq: AC 4204 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how binomial trees can be used to approximate the prices of both European and American call and put options on various underlying assets
    • Understand how the Black-Scholes formula can be used to form the prices of European and American call and put options on various underlying assets
    • Understand the importance of option Greeks and risk management techniques in forming hedged asset portfolios that include positions in both options and the underlying asset
    • Apply all the concepts learned in AC 4204 and the three topics above to actuarial problems 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus
    • Probability
    • Corporate finance
    • Interest theory

    Course Topics
    • Binomial pricing models
    • Black-Scholes option pricing modal
    • Option Greeks and risk management
    • Apply all the concepts learned in AC 4204 and the three topics above to actuarial problems 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Brandon Reid
  
  • AC 4404 - Actuarial Probability Models

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course will begin to prepare students for a fourth actuarial exam. It will provide a more in-depth study of certain topics in probability and mathematical statistics, with a focus on problems and models that are relevant to insurance products. (prereq: MA 2631  and MA 390 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze severity, frequency, and aggregate models
    • Understand what probability distributions are appropriate to model different problems
    • Use probability distributions to evaluate financial risk
    • Understand the relationship between various probability distributions, and the effects of mixing probability distributions         
    • Estimate parameters using maximum likelihood estimation and construct confidence intervals for those parameters
    • Understand various coverage modifications of insurance products, including deductibles, limits, and coinsurance
    • Apply Bayesian and Bühlmann techniques to study credibility
    • Apply knowledge of the course topics in the context of insurance, including calculating premiums and reserves for short-term insurance products

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus
    • Probability
    • Interest theory

    Course Topics
    • Probability distributions
    • Moments and other properties of probability distributions
    • Developing risk models
    • Hazard rate functions
    • Deductibles, limits, and coinsurance
    • Inflation effects
    • Value at risk and tail value at risk
    • Maximum likelihood estimation
    • Bayesian estimation
    • Hypothesis tests, Bayesian information criterion, and other model selection tests
    • Bayesian credibility
    • Bühlmann and Bühlmann-Straub models
    • Short-term insurance and reinsurance
    • Premiums
    • Reserves

    Coordinator
    Dr. Brandon Reid
  
  • AC 4923 - AS Capstone I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of two-course sequence. Students, working in teams of two to four, will propose a project or will pick one of the projects offered by the faculty advisor of the course. The purpose of the project is to apply the knowledge that they have learned through the Actuarial Science program courses to a case study. Students will meet regularly with their faculty advisor to report their progress. (prereq: MA 2630 , MA 2631 , MA 2410 , MA 2411 , MA 390 , or consent of the course faculty advisor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply probability concepts in a real-life case study 
    • Apply statistics and time series analysis to a real-life case study
    • Apply finance and financial mathematics concepts to a real-life case study

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Probability
    • Statistics
    • Financial mathematics

    Course Topics
    • Vary by project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz
  
  • AC 4933 - AS Capstone II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of a two-course capstone sequence. Students will complete their projects that they proposed and developed in the first course, AC 4923 . Students are expected to present the final project either at a professional meeting or to their peers and department faculty at the end of the quarter both orally and in a written report. (prereq: MA 2630 , MA 2631 , MA 2410 , MA 2411 , MA 390 , or consent of the course faculty advisor) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply probability concepts in a real-life case study 
    • Apply statistics and time series analysis to a real-life case study
    • Apply finance and financial mathematics concepts to a real-life case study

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Probability
    • Statistics
    • Financial mathematics

    Course Topics
    • Vary by project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz
  
  • AC 4980 - Topics in Actuarial Science

    0-4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0-4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers topics in Actuarial Science that are not covered in other classes. Topics and structure may vary depending on the mutual interest of faculty and students. (prereq: consent of instructor) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Vary by topics covered.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Depend on topics chosen

    Coordinator
    Dr. Yvonne Yaz

Architectural Engineering

  
  • AE 200 - Statics

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Statics is a study of force systems acting on rigid bodies not in motion. The analysis includes forces acting in and on beams, trusses and frames in equilibrium. Topical content includes 2-D and 3-D systems, free body diagrams, pulley systems, friction, centroids and moments of inertia. Analysis includes both scalar and vector methods. (prereq: MA 137 ) (coreq: PH 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prepare free body diagrams and apply the equations of static equilibrium to particles and rigid bodies
    • Analyze statically determinate trusses
    • Calculate reactions and internal forces in statically determinate beams, demonstrate the variation of shear and moment with diagrams
    • Calculate reactions and hinge forces for statically determinate frames
    • Determine the location of an area’s centroid
    • Solve problems involving friction

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Meaning of scalar and vector values
    • Basic concepts of trigonometry and calculus

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to statics, scalar and vector values
    • Force systems, magnitude, direction, and component
    • Equilibrium of particles in 2-D and 3-D, free body diagrams
    • Moment, couple
    • Equilibrium of rigid bodies
    • Areas, volumes, centroids, and distributed loads
    • Trusses: zero force members, method of joints, method of sections
    • Frames and machines
    • Beams, reactions, shear and moment equations, and shear and moment diagrams
    • Friction

    Coordinator
    Dr. Pouria Bahmani
  
  • AE 490 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject provides an advanced student with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of an area within their major field of study by means of a practical architectural or engineering project. Students are required to research, analyze and develop design solutions. Completed projects are submitted to the faculty advisor in a formal technical communication form as prescribed by the advisor. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 1001 - Freshman Seminar I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Freshman Seminar I introduces the Architectural Engineering, Construction Management, and Civil Engineering majors to the incoming student.  Each major and specialty option will be discussed, as well as the different career paths for each major.  Basics in surveying, organization and understanding of construction drawings and documents will be introduced, as well as a discussion on ethics.  General topics are introduced to develop the students’ academic, personal and interpersonal skills that help in college and create a sense of campus involvement.  In addition, the laboratory periods will teach the basics of CAD drafting and Building Information Modeling (BIM) using AutoCAD and REVIT software. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the program options within the CAECM Department with an emphasis on architectural engineering with one of the three specialties (structural, mechanical, and electrical systems), civil engineering with one of the three specialties (structural, environmental/water resources, construction management) and construction management.
    • Give examples of architectural engineering, civil engineering, and construction management career opportunities.
    • Understand the professional responsibilities and ethical conduct expectations for registered professional engineers and certified construction managers.
    • Understand the building design process and the roles that both architectural engineers, civil engineers, and construction managers play in the development and execution of building projects.
    • Be proficient in the use of AutoCAD and REVIT software
    • Have experience working as an effective team member.
    • Develop academic, personal, and interpersonal skills that will help the student succeed in college and create a sense of campus involvement.
    • Enhance skills in oral presentation, written expression, graphic communication and class participation with practice and feedback.
    • Raise awareness of the student conduct and ethics code

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    •  Introduction of CAECM department and programs
    • Active learning and professionalism
    • GE hours and the process for submission
    • The architectural and engineering design process
    • Introduction of the Construction Management program and specialty
    • Introduction of the Environmental/Water Resources specialty
    • Introduction of Transportation and Geotechnical engineering
    • Introduction of the Structural specialty
    • Introduction of the Electrical specialty
    • Introduction of the Mechanical specialty
    • Ethics for engineers and construction managers
    • MSOE policies and procedures

    Laboratory Topics
    • AutoCAD menu structure, entity creation, saving drawings
    • Creating circles and arcs, using object snaps, using layers
    • Adding dimensions, dimensioning options, adding text, crosshatching
    • Moving and copying entities, creating blocks
    • Block attributes, prototype drawings, title blocks, use of viewports
    • Getting started with REVIT
    • Wall types, doors, windows, elevators
    • Floors, floor to floor height, common walls
    • Roof types, skylights
    • Floor and ceiling systems

    Coordinator
    Dr. Todd Davis
  
  • AE 1002 - Freshman Seminar II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Freshman Seminar II builds on the information taught in Freshman Seminar I.  Students work in teams to solve a building design problem and perform basic engineering calculations, develop project schedules, develop construction estimates, and prepare architectural engineering drawings by hand, using AutoCAD, and using Revit. (prereq: AE 1001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Autodesk Revit

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 1231 - Building Construction Materials

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a study of the properties of construction materials, methods of manufacturing and installation. Materials include wood, steel, concrete, masonry, asphalt and gypsum as components of architectural engineering. A laboratory reinforces the principles presented in lecture. (prereq: one year high school chemistry)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the unique origins, chemistry, properties, standards, construction industry applications and trade organizations specific to the materials used in the construction industry. Materials include aggregates, cement, concrete, masonry, wood, steel, aluminum, asphalt, polymers, plastics and composites
    • Design and execute laboratory experiments that test the physical properties of construction materials as they relate to performance within industry
    • Develop research and communication skills that will enable them to access technical information on materials, evaluate that information for quality, summarize findings concisely, and communicate those findings both in writing and orally
    • Assemble a portfolio of information that has the potential to be a useful resource on materials throughout their academic career at MSOE and beyond

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • One year of high school chemistry

    Course Topics
    • Materials engineering concepts
    • Nature of materials
    • Aggregates
    • Portland cement
    • Concrete
    • Masonry
    • Wood
    • Steel
    • Aluminum
    • Asphalt
    • Polymers and plastics
    • Composites
    • Research paper requirements
    • Final paper presentations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Safety
    • Density of materials
    • Tensile testing
    • Creep testing
    • Aggregate testing
    • Sieve analysis
    • Concrete proportioning
    • Concrete mixing
    • Concrete compression testing
    • Wood lab design and testing

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 2001 - Building Information Modeling

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares the student to utilize building information modeling (BIM) as a coordinated, integrated and consistent approach to a building project in design and construction decision making.  Students are provided the basics to produce high-quality 3-D designs and construction documents, along with cost-estimating, and construction planning.  The students will use BIM in the Senior Project sequence.  This course will utilize Autodesk Revit Building Systems. (prereq: AE 1002 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate skill in using advanced features of Revit Architecture
    • Demonstrate skill in using Revit Structures
    • Demonstrate skill in using Revit MEP (mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic Autodesk Revit
    • Basics of drafting

    Course Topics
    • Getting started with Revit Structures and Revit MEP
    • Floor plans
    • Roof, floor, and ceiling systems
    • Revit Structure - grids, columns, beams
    • Revit Structure - floor, bar joist, footings
    • Water closets, cabinets, furniture
    • Mechanical systems layout
    • Electrical systems layout
    • Renderings

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 2011 - Mechanics of Materials I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the study of stress and strain of elastic bodies. The focus of the course includes Hooke’s Law and stress and strain due to axial force, torsion, bending moment, and shear force. Statically indeterminate structures with axial and torsional loadings are also studied. (prereq: AE 200 PH 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine normal stress and strain, and axial displacement, due to axial loadings. This includes axially determinate and indeterminate structures and thermal loadings
    • Apply Hooke’s Law to determine deformations in elastic materials subjected to biaxial loading
    • Determine shear stress and strain, and twist angle, due to torsional loadings. This includes torsionally determinate and indeterminate structures
    • Determine normal stresses in beams due to bending moment. This includes ordinary and composite beams, and biaxial bending moment
    • Determine normal stresses in structures with combined axial force and bending moment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Concepts and applications of static equilibrium

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, normal stress and shear stress, allowable stress, design concepts
    • Axial loading: Normal strain, thermal strain, axial indeterminacy
    • Poisson effect and Hooke’s law for uniaxial and multiaxial loading
    • Shear strain
    • Concepts of fatigue and stress concentration
    • Torsion: shear stress and strain, angle of twist, torsional indeterminacy
    • Review shear and moment in beams
    • Moment of inertia
    • Bending: normal stress, composite beams
    • Combined axial + bending, biaxial bending

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 2012 - Mechanics of Materials II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the development of elastic solid mechanics. Areas covered are stress transformation and principal stresses, deflection of statically determinate beams and an introduction to the analysis of statically indeterminate beams, elastic buckling of columns, and energy methods. (prereq: AE 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine shear stress and shear flow in beams
    • Calculate stress in pressure vessels
    • Use transformation equations and Mohr’s Circle to determine principal stress and maximum shear stress
    • Determine normal and shear stress in beams subjected to axial + bending + shear + torsional loading
    • Calculate displacement due to bending and use this to analyze flexurally indeterminate beams.
    • Determine elastic buckling capacity of columns
    • Apply concepts of work and strain energy to calculate displacement due to axial, and flexural loads in statically determinate structures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Concepts and applications of static equilibrium

    Course Topics
    • Shear stress and shear flow in beams
    • Normal and shear stress due to combined loadings
    • Pressure vessels, stress transformation, principal stresses, Mohr’s circle, failure theories
    • Beam deflections, statically indeterminate beams
    • Elastic column stability
    • Strain energy, work, and displacement

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 2121 - Fundamentals of Thermodynamics

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides Architectural Engineering and Construction Management students with the necessary fundamentals of thermodynamics as they relate to building thermal systems and applications. Topics cover a range of principles from basic energy and mass balances to refrigeration cycles and heat exchangers. (prereq: MA 137 , PH 2011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine the thermodynamic properties of pure substances using the property tables, and for ideal gases, liquids, and solids using property relationships
    • Apply the first law of thermodynamics to analyze open and closed systems typically encountered in buildings and HVAC systems
    • Apply the second law of thermodynamics to calculate actual and reversible thermal efficiencies, COPs, and power requirements of systems operating on thermodynamic cycles
    • Apply the second law of thermodynamics to analyze isentropic and non-isentropic processes
    • Apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics to analyze the vapor compression (VC) refrigeration cycle and the individual processes that comprise the cycle
    • Understand how heat exchangers work (heating and cooling coils); their energy and mass balances, and their effectiveness

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus II: Basic integration, integration of areas

    Course Topics
    • Basic concepts
    • Properties of pure substances
    • Energy transfer by heat and work
    • 1st Law of Thermodynamics
    • 2nd Law of Thermodynamics
    • Entropy
    • Refrigeration cycles
    • Heat exchangers
    • General review/problem-solving sessions

    Laboratory Topics
    • 1 lab hour to conduct necessary measurements on a heat exchanger and calculate its effectiveness

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 2130 - Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the basic principles of fluid mechanics necessary for the design of building plumbing and fire protection systems, and for the design of air duct systems in building HVAC systems. Specific topics covered include: (1) introduction to basic fluid properties such as specific weight and viscosity, and an introduction to the concept and measurement of pressure, (2) the continuity equation for incompressible, steady flows, (3) the steady flow energy equation for incompressible, adiabatic fluid flow, and its simplified form the Bernoulli equation, (4) computation methods for frictional and minor losses in closed channel flow, (5) Manning’s equation for open channel flow, (6) introduction to flow measuring devices, (7) basic principles of pumps, fans, compressors, and blowers, and (8) an introduction to plumbing and fire protection system design through the use of various, applicable case studies throughout the course, but especially during the last week of the course.  (prereq: AE 2121 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Calculate the pressure at any depth below the surface of a fluid (or fluids) 
    • Calculate the magnitude and the point of application of hydrostatic forces acting on submerged plane surfaces 
    • Apply the equations of static equilibrium to objects floating in a fluid (i.e. buoyancy problems) 
    • Analyze inviscid flow systems using Bernoulli’s equation 
    • Calculate frictional energy losses in pipe using the Darcy-Weisbach and Hazen-Williams equations 
    • Analyze piping systems including pumps/turbines, pipe friction and minor losses using the General Energy equation 
    • Determine the flow rate, head, and power requirements of centrifugal pumps at different operating point using (1) the affinity laws, and (2) manufacturer’s pump curves 
    • Analyze open channel flow problems using Manning’s equations 
    • Calculate the magnitude of forces acting on plane surfaces arising from fluid motion using Newton’s Law of Viscosity

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Thermodynamics (one quarter or one semester) 
    • College physics (one quarter or one semester) 
    • Calculus I

    Course Topics
    • Basic fluid properties/pressure 
    • Continuity equation 
    • Steady flow energy equation for incompressible fluids 
    • Bernoulli equation 
    • Reynolds number and computing frictional and minor losses 
    • Manning’s equation/open channel flows 
    • Flowmeters 
    • Pumps 
    • Design case studies/design problems 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Francis Mahuta
  
  • AE 2150 - Fundamentals of Electricity and Circuits

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents fundamental principles of electrical circuits and power systems that are used in commercial building projects.  Power and energy will be discussed as well as electrical components such as capacitors, inductors, motors, and lighting systems.  Topics will be related to building power distribution and lighting systems in a commercial building. (prereq: MA 137 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the difference between series and parallel circuits
    • Calculate Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s laws
    • Perform nodal and mesh analysis
    • Understand Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems
    • Describe the function of inductors, capacitors, motors and lighting
    • Understand how circuits, current and voltage work
    • Understand the basics of building power distribution and the electrical service

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Calculus

    Course Topics
    • Circuits, current and voltage
    • Series and parallel circuits
    • Ohm’s law
    • Kirchhoff’s current law
    • Kirchhoff’s voltage law
    • Power and engergy
    • Notal analysis
    • Mesh analysis
    • Superposition
    • Thevenin’s theorem
    • Norton’s theorem
    • Maximum power transfer
    • Capacitors
    • Inductors
    • Phasors
    • RMS value
    • Complex power
    • AC generation and sources
    • Building electrical service
    • Building power distribution 
    • Building electrial motors and lighting

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 2250 - Specifications and Contracts

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a working knowledge of the principles for writing effective specifications for building systems and materials, as well as interpreting standard construction industry contracts.  Students will learn the formatting and writing requirements for specifications used in the construction industry, utilizing the CSI MasterFormat.  Students will also review standard contracts such as AIA and EJCDC common form contracts. (prereq: AE 1001  or CV 1001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the nature and responsibilities undertaken by parties to a contract
    • Understand the basic terms and conditions in AIA and EJCDC contracts
    • Describe typical construction project delivery methods
    • Organize, prepare, interpret, and write construction specifications
    • Understand the CSI MasterFormat system of organizing specifications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Fundamental building systems
    • Basic construction materials

    Course Topics
    • Project delivery methods
    • Types of contracts
    • AIA and EJCDC contract forms and language
    • Organization of specifications and drawings
    • The project manual
    • Specification writing
    • General conditions
    • Supplementary conditions
    • Guarantees and warranties
    • General requirements
    • Specification language and resources
    • Product selection
    • CSI MasterFormat

    Coordinator
    Doug Nelson
  
  • AE 3201 - Principles of Structural Engineering

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course builds on concepts from statics and mechanics of materials to introduce the student to the principles of structural engineering.  Students will be introduced to structural analysis of determinate structures, design of steel and reinforced concrete beams, and design of steel columns.  (prereq: AE 2012 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the material properties of steel and concrete and the common geometric properties of steel and reinforced concrete structural elements
    • Describe the assumed mechanical behavior of flexural members and compressive elements made with steel or reinforced concrete
    • Analyze framing plans to determine loadings on structural components
    • Analyze statically determinate structural elements and systems to determine the internal forces and the displacements
    • Analyze steel or reinforced concrtee elements to determine their flexural or compressive capacity
    • Describe common connections of structural members

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Deformation and displacement of statically determinate system

    Course Topics
    • Review of tributary load, load types, shear and moment diagrams
    • Design approaches - ASD and LRFD
    • Introduction to steel materials and shapes
    • Introduction to AISC specifications for beams and columns
    • Steel beam flexural and shear capacity including Lat-Tors buckling 
    • Steel column capacity; buckling
    • Introduction to bolted and welded connections
    • Introduction to concrete and reinforcement materials and shapes
    • Introduction to ACI specifications for beams and columns
    • Moment-curvature behavior of reinforced concrete beams, stress-strain relations
    • Reinforced concrete beam flexural and shear capacity
    • Estimating reinforced concrete beam deflections
    • Introduction to detailing concrete reinforcement
    • Reinforced concrete column capacity (axial load only)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3211 - Structural Analysis

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents methods of structural analysis for indeterminate structures.  Topics include virtual work method for deflections, flexibility method, stiffness methods, and computerized structural analysis. Course includes laboratory exercises. (prereq: AE 3201 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze statically determinate structures with complex loadings and geometry
    • Analyze statically indeterminate structures using classical methods
    • Distringuish the needed level of accuracy in an engineering model
    • Compare results from computer software and hand calculations
    • Interpret test results using theoretical concepts as supporting evidence
    • Describe key components in mechanical test systems including load apparatus and data acquisition

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Static analysis of beams, frames and trusses
    • Deformation and displacement of statically determinate systems
    • Structural loadings and load paths

    Course Topics
    • Use of structural analysis software
    • Forces in statically determinate beams and frames
    • Forces in statically determinate trusses
    • Displacements of determinate structures by the Virtual Work method
    • Redundant Force Method for indeterminate structures
    • Moment distribution for beams and non-sway frames
    • Influence lines, pattern loading and moving loads

    Laboratory Topics
    • Lab safety; introduction to equipment
    • Strain and stress analysis: tension, stress concentration, bending, torsion
    • Elastic buckling
    • Development of plastic hinge
    • Truss analysis and behavior

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3221 - Steel Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents design of beams, composite beams, columns, beam-columns, tension members, bolted connections, and welded connections for strength and serviceability in accordance with American Institute of Steel Construction specifications. (prereq: AE 3201 ) (coreq: AE 3211 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and design steel members subject to axial compression
    • Analyze and design steel members subject to axial tension
    • Analyze and design steel members subject to combined axial force and flexure
    • Analyze and design composite steel-concrete members
    • Calculate torsional moments acting on steel members and design members to resist torsional moments
    • Calculate shear and moment in continuous beam systems and design continuous beams
    • Calculate connection capacities based on a limit state analysis
    • Apply AISC design criteria and understand fabrication, erection and economic factors

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Principles of structural engineering

    Course Topics
    • Introduction
    • Tension members
    • Compression members
    • Flexural members
    • Continuous beams
    • Beam-columns
    • Composite steel-concrete members
    • Torsion
    • Connection design

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3231 - Concrete Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents design and detailing of cast-in-place, reinforced concrete flexural and compression members for strength and serviceability in accordance with American Concrete Institute specifications. (prereq: AE 3201 ) (coreq: AE 3211 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze cast-in-place, reinforced concrete buildings to determine the internal forces in members from external loads and member deflections
    • Calculate the moment-curvature behavior of reinforced concrete sections subjected to flexure and apply the behavior for the design of reinforced concrete beams and one-way slabs for flexural strength
    • Design reinforced concrete beams and one-way slabs for flexural, shear, and torsional strength, and detail for serviceablity and construction
    • Design and detail reinforced concrete spread footings to support axial loads
    • Design and detail reinforced concrete columns and walls for axial and flexural loads
    • Calculate the moment magnification in non-sway, reinforced concrete columns
    • Integrate the behavior and design of individual members into the design of an overall structure
    • Understand the fundamental principles underlying the reinforced concrete building code and what drives changes in the building code

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Principles of structural engineering

    Course Topics
    • Analysis of reinforced concrete structures
    • Moment-curvature behavior
    • Nominal flexural capacity
    • Design of beams for flexure and deflection
    • Development of reinforcement
    • Shear and torsion capacity
    • Continuous beam and slab design
    • Spread footing and retaining wall design
    • P-M interaction diagrams
    • Design of compression members
    • Design of walls
    • Design of reinforced concrete structures

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3251 - Structural Systems Design

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to structural design of buildings for lateral and gravity loads.  Topics include determining loads on buildings, design of lateral force resisting systems, design of floor systems, design of columns, and design of foundations. (prereq: AE 3211 , AE 3221 ) (coreq: AE 3231 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine gravity and lateral loadings on building frames
    • Analyze and design steel frames and/or systems subjected to gravity and lateral loads
    • Analyze and design concrete frames and/or systems subjected to gravity and lateral loads
    • Develop efficient building geometrics for concrete and steel framed systems
    • Design efficient lateral force resisting systems
    • Design multi-story columns
    • Design foundations for building systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Structural analysis
    • Steel design

    Course Topics
    • Determination of loads
    • Computerized design
    • Open web steel joist and metal deck systems
    • Precast concrete systems
    • Diaphragm design
    • Steel frame design
    • Concrete frame design
    • Foundation design

    Laboratory Topics
    • Computerized modeling
    • Steel frame project
    • Concrete frame project
    • Foundation design

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3301 - Principles of Building Mechanical Systems

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers fundamentals of building mechanical systems including HVAC, plumbing, and fire protection applications.  The course is split in two 5-week segments. Segment 1 covers heating and ventilation including basics of heat transfer, psychrometric relationships, and basic heating load calculations (solar radiation and cooling load calculations are covered in the BMS I course.) Segment 2 covers plumbing and fire protection principles. Plumbing topics covered include water supply system sizing, plumbing fixtures and components, sanitary drainage systems, sewage treatment and disposal, and storm drainage systems. Fire Protection topics include component sizing fire science, fire safety design, fire detection and fire alarm systems, fire suppression systems, automatic sprinkler systems and smoke control principles. Applicable codes and standards will be discussed for HVAC systems, plumbing systems, and fire protection systems.   (prereq: AE 2130 , AE 2121 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Classify and describe a complete air-conditioning and distribution system with its central equipment
    • Compute and determine the psychrometric properties of moist air
    • Analyze the physiological considerations for human comfort in buildings, and calculate its related indices
    • Classify and estimate the indoor air contaminants, and use methods to control them
    • Explain the three modes of heat transfer, and calculate their rates in specific applications
    • Define outdoor and indoor design conditions, and calculate heat losses
    • Calculate Infiltration rates through different components of the building envelop
    • Calculate heating energy use of different heating application
    • Apply the principles of fire chemistry to the effects fires have had on buildings and human life
    • Discuss the principles of smoke, heat and flame detection and methods of signaling warning alarms to building occupants
    • Relate architectural and engineering building design elements and materials of construction to fire suppression systems for buildings
    • Cite design principles for fire suppression systems
    • Apply fluid mechanics design methods to calculate fire suppression component size, based on Hazen-Williams formulation and other general energy theories, when given proposed piping layouts
    • Explain architectural and engineering design requirements of plumbing systems for buildings
    • Apply design principles for plumbing based on the importance of the health, safety and welfare of people using buildings and based on how people use plumbing systems
    • Relate water quality and treatments to improve water quality
    • Apply fluid mechanics design methods, based on Darcy-Weisbach, Manning, and Hazen-Williams formulations and other general energy theories and probability and statistical data, to calculate plumbing design problems based on example piping layouts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Introduction to fluid mechanics
    • Fluid properties
    • Continuity and energy equations
    • Internal flow
    • Major and minor losses
    • Principles of fans and pumps

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, general idea of air-conditioning and distribution systems 
    • Psychrometrics
    • Human comfort 
    • Heat transfer 
    • Heating load 
    • Infiltration 
    • Introduction to fire protection systems 
    • System design approaches 
    • Introduction to plumbing 
    • Design considerations for water distribution systems 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 3321 - Architectural History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces ideas and goals of architectural expression as they have developed from ancient civilizations to the present. Topics include historical development of architectural reasoning and construction techniques. Specific structures are analyzed for their impact on architecture and urban/rural form. (prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the development of architectural engineering concepts through history
    • Describe the logic and innovation in the development of construction techniques
    • Describe design philosophies (current and historical) and critically analyze an AE project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and the seven wonders of the ancient world
    • Egyptian architecture- Temple of Karnak, Pyramids
    • Greek architecture- Athens, the Parthenon, Acropolis, theater and the five orders (column types) of architecture
    • Roman architecture-Coliseum, Pantheon, Circus Maximus, the Forum Aqueducts and other engineering wonders
    • Early Christian, Byzantine and the Pisa Cathedral
    • Analysis of Romanesque architecture, Gothic Cathedrals and medieval castles
    • Renaissance Baroque and Palladian architecture
    • The plan for London and Sir Christopher Wren
    • The plan for Paris
    • Modern architecture 1850 (industrial age) to present-Sir Joseph Paxton, Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto, Le Courbusier and others
    • Current trends in architecture-Charles Moore, Phillip Johnson, Michael Graves, Frank Gehry and other
    •  

    Laboratory Topics
    • Research paper/critical analysis of a related AE & BC topic

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 3421 - Building Mechanical Systems I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the development of heating and cooling systems design, building on the basics learned in the Principles of Building Mechanical Systems (AE 3301).  The course starts with the topic of Solar Radiation and the principles of Cooling Load calculations and continues to the detailed analysis of HVAC systems and equipment.  The course covers manual calculations for designing and sizing HVAC equipment, studying part-load performance, in addition to the ASHRAE Standards requirements.  Upon completion of the course, the student will acquire an understanding of energy, ventilation, and human comfort standards, and the capability to handle design characteristics, and selection, of HVAC systems components.  (pre-req: AE 3301 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Compute and determine the solar angles, and calculate heat gains from solar radiation
    • Define all heat gains in a given building, and calculate the total cooling load of a building
    • Apply the basic principles of Fluid Mechanics, to calculate pressure losses in Ducts and Pipes
    • Classify and analyze different types and methods of air distributions systems
    • Analyze various types of fans and pumps, including VFD’s
    • Analyze and characterize different HVAC equipment (compressors, cooling towers, condensers, evaporators, furnaces, boilers, domestic hot water systems, radiant heating unit ventilators, unit heaters unitary air conditioners, heat pumps, and room and packaged air conditioners
    • Design heat exchangers
    • Calculate energy consumption in buildings
    • Examine and relate the ASHRAE Standards to HVAC calculations and design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Psychrometrics
    • Modes of heat transfer
    • Fluid mechanics

    Course Topics
    • Solar radiation 
    • Cooling load calculations 
    • Duct design and fans 
    • Piping design and pumps 
    • Air distribution systems 
    • Energy calculations 
    • Compressors 
    • Cooling towers, condensers 
    • Evaporators, COP, PLR 
    • Furnaces, boilers 
    • Domestic hot water, heat pumps 
    • Heat exchanger design and selection 
    • Radiant heating 
    • Unit ventilators, unit heaters, makeup air units
    • ASHRAE standards 
    • Valves 
    • Unitary air conditioners, heat pumps 
    • Room and packaged air conditioners 

    Laboratory Topics
    • Photovoltaics
    • Fan curves
    • VC refrigeration cycle
    • Heating, cooling and humidification
    • Compliance with ASHRAE standards
    • Field trips to explore large commercial building mechanical rooms.

    Coordinator
    David Grassl
  
  • AE 3422 - Building Mechanical Systems II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the development of heating and cooling systems design, by applying what has been learned in AE 3301 (Principles of Building Mechanical Systems) and the Systems-and-Equipment-intensive course AE 3421 (Building Mechanical Systems I). The course applies a systematic approach to the use of heating and cooling design as required by building simulation software currently used in the industry. An actual commercial building case study is utilized as a term project.  In addition, the course covers the concept of Net-Zero Energy buildings. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to comprehensively design an HVAC system in a real building using a building energy simulation program (Trace 700), and to produce all the necessary mechanical drawings. (prereq: AE 3421 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the fundamental parts of building energy simulation structures and their hierarchies
    • Define all heat gains and losses in a given building, and calculate the total cooling load and heating load of a building
    • Apply the basic principles of fluid mechanics, to calculate pressure losses in ducts and produce an impeccable duct design
    • Analyze and characterize different cooling equipment systems
    • Analyze and characterize different heating equipment systems
    • Analyze and characterize different cooling equipment plants
    • Analyze and characterize different heating equipment plants
    • Examine and relate the ASHRAE Standards to HVAC calculations and design.
    • Examine and relate the utility rate structures to the building energy consumption and demand
    • Design heat exchangers
    • Calculate the life cycle cost of the HVAC systems
    • Identify energy conservation, and renewable production, measures to reach Net-Zero-Energy building design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • HVAC primary and secondary equipment
    • Load calculations
    • Compliance with standards

    Course Topics
    • Building energy simulation software structure 
    • Cooling and heating loads fundamentals and calculations 
    • Cooling systems 
    • Heating systems 
    • Cooling and heating plants 
    • Utility (electricity and gas rate structures)
    • Assigning cooling and heating systems to plants
    • Economics; life cycle cost 
    • Duct design 
    • Pipe design 
    • Fan selection 
    • Net-Zero-Energy buildings
    • Building energy simulations labs

    Laboratory Topics
    • Building energy simulation modeling

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3451 - Building Systems Control

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course familiarizes the mechanical and electrical specialty student with a basic knowledge of HVAC, electrical, illumination and communication system controls and control theory. Topics covered will be pneumatic, electric, and electronic control systems and components. Building energy management and its connection to control systems will be introduced. In addition to this, basic motors starters and power sources will be reviewed. Reinforcement of the various topics will be provided through laboratory tests. (prereq: AE 3421  for mechanical specialty students, AE 3632  and AE 3636  for electrical specialty students)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have a basic knowledge of MEP system control theory
    • Be able to write a basic control specification for a variety of MEP system types
    • Be able to discuss the operating characteristics and proper application of control systems components
    • Be able to design a basic control system using the proper interface devices
    • Be able to read, interpret and evaluate existing control diagrams
    • Have a basic knowledge of controls systems and applications across multiple disciplines

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic MEP systems

    Course Topics
    • Basic control theory and terminology
    • Elements of control systems
    • Control energy sources and control devices
    • Sub-system controls
    • Equipment control
    • Complete HVAC control systems
    • Management and control systems
    • Central plant control systems
    • Electrical and Illumination control systems
    • Communication and other low voltage control systems
    • Building Automation System (BAS) structure
    • Integration of non-HVAC control systems into a BAS

    Laboratory Topics
    • Control equipment identification
    • System schematic design
    • Building automation systems
    • HVAC controls
    • Lighting controls
    • Site visit

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 3521 - Plumbing Systems Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of plumbing and fire suppression principles and transitions into the system component design, layout, and specification concepts of plumbing systems.  The plumbing systems components to be examined include plumbing fixtures, piping, water heating equipment, pumps and water reuse systems.  System sizing problems for water supply, wastewater disposal, storm water treatment/disposal, and miscellaneous equipment will be covered.  Design standards and variations will be discussed using plumbing codes and master specifications.  The architectural engineer’s responsibilities in design and specification writing will be emphasized through examples of construction document components, including plans, details and specifications. (prereq: AE 3301 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Integrate backflow prevention devices into water supply systems to protect potable water systems
    • Adapt water treatment equipment into plumbing systems to improve water quality
    • Analyze the hot water demands for a building and integrate appropriate water heating equipment
    • Design a pumping system to maintain water temperature in a hot water system compared to losing temperature in a hydronic heating system
    • Analyze water supply flow and pressure needs of a project and integrate water supply booster pumps into water supply systems
    • Design sanitary and clear water pumping systems when needed to lift sanitary or storm waste to flow to gravity sewers
    • Integrate wastewater interceptors into sanitary waste disposal systems
    • Analyze pre-existing storm water flow from a building site, compare it to post-construction storm water flow, and to design a basin for retention or detention of the excess quantity difference
    • Apply fluid mechanics principles, other general energy theories, and probability and statistical data to enhance design methods for calculating pipe sizes for all plumbing systems design layouts
    • Adapt and modify specification for a variety of plumbing system piping, specialties, fixtures and equipment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic plumbing systems, water and drain-sizing calculations

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to plumbing codes, standards and specifications
    • Water supply and waste disposal system sizing review
    • Plumbing fixture selection and specifications
    • Backflow prevention device selections and specifications
    • Water treatment equipment selection and specifications
    • Hot water demand analysis
    • Water heater selections and specification
    • Hot water maintenance circulating pump selection and specification
    • Water supply analysis for pressure and booster pump selection
    • Sub-sewer drainage analysis and sump pump selection
    • Wastewater interceptors and grease traps selection and specification
    • Water reuse system design
    • Storm water drainage system for building and property

    Coordinator
    Doug Nelson
  
  • AE 3531 - Fire Suppression Systems Design

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of plumbing and fire suppression principles and transitions into the system component design, layout and specification concepts of fire suppression systems. The fire suppression systems components to be examined include wet sprinkler systems, alternative agent systems, pumping equipment and fire suppression piping and installation specifications. Design tools to be used include traditional calculations, spreadsheets, and computerized modeling programs. Design standards and variations will be discussed using NFPA codes and master specifications. The architectural engineer’s responsibilities in design and specification writing will be emphasized through examples of construction document components, including plans, details and specifications. (prereq: AE 3301 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze a building type to determine the proper fire protection system selection
    • Analyze water supply flow pressures and needs of a project.
    • Describe fire chemistry and discuss the effects fires have had on buildings and human life
    • Discuss principles of smoke, heat and flame detection and methods of signaling warning alarms to building occupants
    • Discuss architectural and engineering building design eleements and materials of construction as they relate to fire suppression systems for buildings
    • Apply fluid mechanics design methods, based on Hazen-Williams formulation and other general energy thoeries, to calculate fire suppression design problems based on example piping layouts
    • Design and layout an automatic fire suppression system for a commercial building
    • Design and size the fire suppression pump system for a commercial building

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic fire protection systems, piping sizing calculations

    Course Topics
    • Fire chemistry
    • History of fire in buildings
    • Types of fire suppression systems
    • Materials and equipment
    • Planning
    • Sprinkler layout
    • Hangers and hanging
    • Job site surveys and coordination
    • Water supplies and underground piping
    • Hydraulic calculations
    • Modeling program use
    • Pumps and pumping systems
    • Standpipe systems
    • Design calculations for complex systems

    Laboratory Topics
    • Field surveys and piping 
    • Water supply testing & selection of type of fire suppression for building occupancy
    • Fire pump analysis using a variable speed pump
    • Sprinkler head flow analysis
    • Analysis of water flow in an existing sprinkler system
    • Predicting flow rates and pressure in an existing system
    • Water supply flow test and analysis
    • Fire suppression system design project calculations and specs

    Coordinator
    Doug Nelson
  
  • AE 3601 - Principles of Electrical Engineering for Buildings

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This introductory electrical systems design course presents basic concepts on the design and implementation of building power and lighting systems. Power system topics include AC electrical power calculations, overcurrent protective devices, distribution equipment, transformers, motors, grounding, conductors and conduits. Emphasis is placed on cross-discipline coordination as well as an introduction to the National Electrical Code. Lighting system topics include the introduction to light sources, light fixtures, lighting controls as well as applicable codes and standards. This course features a design project where students are required to generate and present a basic set of electrical design documents. (prereq: EE 201  or AE 2150 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Perform basic single and three phase power calculations, and understand relationships between Apparent Power, Real Power, Reactive Power and Power Factor
    • Identify basic electrical power distribution systems
    • Understand the role of system grounding and equipment grounding for safety and proper system operation
    • Calculate basic short circuit levels available in low voltage distribution systems, based upon transformer sizes and impedances
    • Calculate and select proper size conductors and conduits for various electrical loads
    • select fuses or circuit breakers for various electrical loads, understanding the advantages and disadvantages of protecting with fuses and circuit breakers
    • Draw a basic one-line of an electrical distribution system, indicating the proper sizes of all major components
    • Draw a room in plan view, indicating circuits, conductors, and home runs to a supply panel
    • Select lighting sources and luminaires appropriate to task, function, and space type
    • Calculate illuminance and lighting power density in a typical application

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electrical current
    • AC steady-state analysis
    • DC circuit analysis

    Course Topics
    • Electrical design in buildings
    • Codes and standards including the National Electrical Code
    • Electrical power
    • 3-phase power
    • Short circuits
    • Transformers
    • Motors
    • Conductors
    • Voltage drop
    • Overcurrent protection
    • Coordination with other disciplines
    • Lighting sources and equipment
    • Lighting calculations
    • Lighting controls

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 3622 - Building Electrical Systems I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This electrical specialty course presents advanced design concepts of building low and medium voltage power systems. Students will become familiar with building load flow calculations, power factor correction, per unit fault calculations, arc flash and fault currents, selection and coordination of overcurrent protection between devices, sizing of feeder and branch circuits and electrical code application.  Additional topics include the design of electric service entrances, power company coordination and metering, distribution equipment, emergency generators, motors, underground and campus distribution systems. Case studies are presented throughout, which reinforce theory and the application of electrical code. Each laboratory session focuses on an individual topic and will be utilized as a collaborative design session to present the implementation of the lecture material. (prereq: AE 3601 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Calculate AC current, voltage, impedance and power using complex numbers
    • Perform service and feeder calculations including demand factors
    • Determine conduit and conductor size and grounding for various load types
    • Understand building voltages and proper voltage system selection according to facility use and size
    • Understand system grounding and ground fault protection
    • Select overcurrent protection including molded case, insulated case, and power circuit breakers and fuses
    • Perform ohmic and per unit short circuit calculations by hand
    • Perform system studies using power system analysis software
    • Understand motor operation, protection and control
    • Specify major electrical equipment for a building service including switchgear, motor control centers, switchboards, transformers, and panelboards
    • Specify major electrical equipment for an emergency distribution system including generators, automatic transfer switches, and ininterruptible power supplies
    • Understand distribution system configurations such as radial and loop and their selection
    • Design electrical power distribution for a large commercial building or campus center

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic electrical systems, power and lighting calculations

    Course Topics
    • Transformers
    • Motors
    • Generators
    • Fuses
    • Circuit breakers
    • Medium voltage equipment
    • Grounding 
    • Substations
    • Short circuit calculations
    • OCPD coordination

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 3632 - Illumination Systems Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Building lighting systems and site lighting will be explored through application of lighting principles. Students will become familiar with light sources, visual comfort, lighting control systems and daylighting. Hand calculations will be followed by use of a lighting software program. Code compliance in areas of egress and emergency lighting, as well as energy codes, will be integrated into a lighting design problem that will serve as the final project for the course. Topics include vision and light, light sources and luminaries, lighting calculations, lighting design (task, ambient, accent and decorative), exterior lighting including LEED requirements, lighting controls, daylighting, energy and life safety codes. (prereq: AE 3601 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Be knowledgeable and able to select light sources specific to architectural design, space function, and task
    • Be knowledgeable and able to select luminaires specific to architectural design, space function, and task
    • Apply a wide range of lighting control strategies and select the appropriate technology based on user and space requirements
    • Determine prescribed illumination levels by space type and according to industry standards
    • Perform calculations to inform design decisions, employing both manual calculations and lighting design software
    • Design lighting for a facility, document the design, and be able to visually and orally present and explain the core design concepts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic lighting systems, lighting calculations

    Course Topics
    • Light and physiology of vision
    • Light sources
    • Luminaires
    • Light and color
    • Daylightening
    • Design process
    • Design documentation
    • Lighting controls
    • Lighting metrics
    • Photometric calculations
    • Lighting calculation software
    • Exterior lighting
    • Building codes and emergency illumination
    • Energy codes and LEED

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 3636 - Communication Systems Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Students will gain an understanding of various low voltage systems and how they function in typical building applications. Data networks, telephone, signaling, multimedia, security, and fire alarm along with the supporting equipment will be studied. Emphasis will be on viewing each low voltage modality as a fully functional system. Practice in specifying and laying out building low voltage systems will cumulate in a final project. Relevant codes and standards will be referenced and integrated into design work. Topics include communication systems, data networks, signaling, multimedia (A/V, videoconferencing), security, fire alarm, monitoring, building automation systems. (prereq: AE 3601 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the various low voltage systems and cabling which are regularly encountered in the design and building construction industry
    • Become a resource to both design and construction professionals to properly coordinate and implement low voltage systems into a building
    • Apply knowledge of codes and standards as they relate to the design of low voltage systems such as Fire Alarm, Telecommunications, and Nurse Call for the protection of human life and physical wellbeing
    • Understand the process of designing and specifying low voltage and telecommunications systems, the infrastructure necessary to facilitate proper installation, and the coordination required with other disciplines of design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic electrical systems
    • Electrical power calculations

    Course Topics
    • Introduction of low voltage and communication systems
    • Principles of signal transmission
    • Network cable and bandwith
    • Wireless technologies
    • Network equipment
    • Building network infrastructure and topology design
    • Campus network infrastructure
    • Mass notification systems
    • Fire alarm systems
    • Audio, video, multimedia systems
    • Healthcare systems
    • Building automation systems
    • Integration of systems

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 3661 - Electrical Power Quality for Buildings

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers topics involving typical equipment utilizing solid state devices for power quality, such as uninterruptible power supplies, transient voltage suppressors, power line conditioners and voltage regulators. Grounding and neutral systems are studied. The student is exposed to basic electronic concepts, devices monitoring and analysis associated with this equipment. (prereq: AE 3632 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify various power quality disturbances by their waveform signatures and explain typical techniques for mitigating the problem
    • Explain the benefits associated with operating at a high power factor and make proper power factor capacitor selections
    • Determine the IEEE-std-519 limits for harmonic current and voltage distortion for a given power system
    • Perform harmonic current and voltage analysis
    • Specify UPS, active harmonic filters and other power quality equipment
    • Design a base harmonic filter
    • Recommend proper TVSS ratings for various equipment or applications  

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic electrical systems
    • Power and illumination calculations

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to electrical power quality
    • Power sources
    • Power, power factor and efficiency
    • Power frequency disturbances and power line conditioners
    • Uninterruptible power supplies and standby generators
    • Harmonics, harmonic analysis and harmonic mitigation techniques
    • Grounding for safety and power quality
    • Transients and Transient Voltage Sure Suppressors (TVSS)
    • EMI disturbances and filters
    • Power quality audits
    • Power quality problem diagnosis

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 4121 - Environmental Science in Building Construction

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces concepts of environmental science and principles of sustainability, in the context of the built environment. Major environmental drivers of the sustainable construction movement including climate change, ozone depletion, biodiversity losses, and others are presented. Societal and political factors influencing adoption of sustainable practices are discussed. The significance of various green building rating systems such as LEED, Green Globes, and Envision is introduced. Techniques for improving the sustainability of the built environment, including energy and water conservation, appropriate site selection, appropriate materials use, and construction management techniques to minimize environmental impacts are presented. Basic Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) techniques and software tools are introduced. (prereq: AE 1231 , CH 200 , junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate the ability to design a building system, component, or process to meet realistic constraints imposed by economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, and sustainability factors.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how sustainability issues and environmentally responsible design decisions intersect with an engineers’ professional and ethical responsibilities
    • Articulate how sustainable design principles and practices contribute to his/her attainment of the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Drivers for sustainability 
    • Green building assessment and sustainability rating systems
    • Green building design process
    • Economic analysis of green buildings 
    • Sustainable sites 
    • Energy and atmosphere 
    • Water quality and quantity parameters 
    • Materials and Life Cycle Assessment
    • Indoor environmental quality 
    • Construction operations and building commissioning 

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Gonwa
  
  • AE 4311 - Architectural Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course offers the student an opportunity to understand and demonstrate skills in problem solving and design of building projects. Areas stressed in this course include problem analysis and solving, project design, graphic and oral presentation techniques, architectural programming, building code search and working drawing standards. (prereq: senior standing) (coreq: AE 4712  or CM 4712 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Design various solutions to building problems
    • Develop graphics that communicate their proposed solution
    • Compile necessary research to complete a building design
    • Summarize relevant building code requirements for their project
    • Develop graphics and models that communicate their building design in a three-dimensional format
    • Prepare presentations that communicate their solutions to clients graphically and verbally
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of working drawings
    • Demonstrate an ability to work in a team environment
    • Develop a better understanding and working knowledge of CADD and BIM

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Creative thinking
    • Three-dimensional thought
    • Design methodology
    • Problem solving
    • Site considerations
    • Building plan considerations
    • Building form considerations
    • Architectural model making
    • Working drawing overview
    • Technological considerations
    • Presentation considerations
    • Bubble diagramming
    • Building type research
    • Zoning issues and building code issues

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 4412 - Engineering and Building Investment Economics

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides financial and economic concepts that confront the building construction, engineer, and design professional. The student is taught their role in pre-development analysis along with the basic principles of real estate investment. An insight is gained on the economic factors that motivate the client to build. Topics include financing the construction project, interest rates, economic decision making, life cycle costs, rate of return analysis, depreciation, income taxes, budgeting, financial statement evaluations, professional liability, investment analysis, value engineering and sustainable design calculations, cash flow analysis, engineering economics, appreciation, tax shelter, development history, zoning, tax laws, equity investments, LEED/sustainable development, and appraisal techniques. Emphasis is placed on the application of economic analysis to the senior design projects. The instructor may arrange guest lectures and tours throughout the quarter. (prereq: senior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determine the requirements necessary to finance a construction project from a lender’s perspective
    • Relate relevant historical real estate development precedents to current situations
    • Describe and solve financial measuring tools such as rate of return, discounted cash flow, and debt service coverage
    • Calculate basic compounding and discounting measures
    • Demonstrate the concept of depreciation
    • Describe various contractual relationships and corporate organizational structures
    • Organize, formulate, and present independent research on your proposed development
    • Prepare preliminary building design alternatives, with construction and development cost estimates
    • Structure financial alternatives needed to enhance a project feasibility
    • Summarize the various roles that government plays in the building process
    • Apply engineering economics formulas
    • Structure a financial analysis (case study) of a potential real estate development with an understanding of all the components that make up this analysis
    • Use various quantitative real estate development tools necessary to evaluate alternatives, determine Life Cycle Cost (LCC) alternatives, and become a thoughtful decision maker
    • Identify various sources for real estate financing and equity investments
    • Differentiate and summarize various property types, local economic business cycles, architectural designs, construction variables, governmental roles, community interactions, and personal motivations that are integral in every real estate project
    • Organize working in a multi-disciplined team approach

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Fundamentals of real estate development (2 classes)
    • Real estate development history (2 classes)
    • Entrepreneurship (1 class)
    • Current real estate topics-new urbanism (2 classes)
    • Real estate development partners and organizational structures (2 classes)
    • Engineering economics (3 classes)
    • Current real estate development financial issues (2 classes)
    • Building investment pro forma analysis/spread sheet formulation (3 classes)
    • Site selection and analysis (1 class)
    • Public sector roles/community issues (1 class)
    • Pre-development analysis-preliminary design, construction estimates, preliminary financing, and market conditions (3 classes)
    • Contract negotiation/development completion (2 classes)
    • Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis and determinations (3 classes)
    • Property management (1 class)
    • Real estate development team presentations (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 4712 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project I

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the first part of a three-part series in designing a building for a real-life client using the design build project delivery method. The course concentrates on preparing and developing the required “program” a designer must complete in order to understand the client’s building and design goals and requirements. The students must understand spatial relationships, building users, building codes and budget constraints in the development of the final program. The program is then used in the follow-on senior project courses in subsequent quarters, as the basis of the design for the building. Other topics include team organization, team building, client interviewing skills, LEED and sustainable development, space analysis, building code review, building type research, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and CAD. Note: BSAE students should register for AE 4712; BSCM students should register for CM 4712 ; five-year two-degree BSAE/BSCM students should register for AE 4712 in their fourth year and CM 4712  in their fifth year. Students must take this course in consecutive terms with AE 4721 /CM 4721 , followed by AE 4731 /CM 4731  and AE 4733 . (prereq: senior standing or fifth year standing in BSAE/BSCM five-year program, successful completion of all junior level AE design specialty courses, major GPA of at least 2.0) (coreq: AE 4311 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Formulate the space requirements of a building based on client interviews and research
    • Generate appropriate plans based on the required spatial relationships
    • Identify appropriate LEED and sustainable design features
    • Determine appropriate Building Code regulations that apply to their project
    • Analyze budget constraints
    • Research appropriate building type examples for their project
    • Facilitate team organization and team building

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Team building
    • Design Build Delivery System
    • Programming
    • Space analysis
    • Research and data Collection
    • LEED
    • Interviewing
    • Building Code review
    • Conceptual estimating
    • Building Information Modeling (BIM)

    Laboratory Topics
    • All topics will be covered throughout the fall quarter, the actual lecture sequence of topics will be based on individual assignments/design problems

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 4721 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project II

    1 lecture hours 3 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of the three-part senior project series. This is a team-taught course, taught by architects, structural engineers, HVAC engineers, plumbing and fire protection engineers, building electrical power distribution engineers and construction managers. It continues to emphasize the design-build process and requires an interdisciplinary team of students to utilize their respective engineering design specialty courses or construction management expertise as they design a building and plan for its construction by using estimating, scheduling, budgeting and construction project management techniques. The following phases will be completed: (1) site analysis; (2) preliminary architectural drawings and presentations; (3) architectural design development drawings; (4) preliminary engineering (structural, environmental, electrical) systems analysis; (5) preliminary budget analysis; (6) project scheduling and (7) ongoing project management responsibilities; (8) presentation to clients and other professionals. Note: Four-year BSAE students must register for AE 4721; four-year BSCM students must register for CM 4721 ; five-year BASE/BSCM two-degree students must register for AE 4721 in their fourth year and four CM 4721  in their fifth year. The three-course sequence 4712/4721/4731 must be taken in consecutive quarters during the same academic year. (prereq: senior standing, AE 4712 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop an entire design-build project from conceptualization to final design. Factors evaluated will be design, architectural and engineering systems and analysis, construction feasibility, selection of methods for construction, schedule, budget, logistics, and economics
    • Reinforce students’ knowledge of their (a) specialty area(s) in Architectural Engineering or (b) Construction Management
    • Develop presentation and communication skills
    • Develop pseudo industry work relationships using the student and faculty team approach
    • Reinforcement of team approach in a design-build project environment
    • Explain usage of sustainable and energy conscious design and material selections (LEED)
    • Develop an understanding of building codes
    • Apply appropriate use of computer tools
    • Individual specialty outcomes:
    • Structural
    • Determine structural systems compatible with architectural design and other engineering disciplines
    • Identify structural loadings and other structural design criteria
    • Explain lateral force resisting systems
    • Knowledge of structural design evident in structural plans
    • Knowledge of structural design evident in structural details
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural analysis by hand
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural analysis by computer programs
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural design calculations
    • Explain structural design and behavior issues in meetings and presentations
    • Electrical
    • Develop electrical power systems to be compatible with architectural design and other engineering disciplines
    • Explain electrical lighting systems and daylighting considerations
    • Explain building sustainability issues with respect to electrical design
    • Explain emergency systems, egress lighting, exit signs, and fire alarm systems/pumps
    • Explain auxiliary electrical systems, telephone, data, CATV, central clock, and PA/intercom systems
    • Calculate building power requirements by hand
    • Calculate power requirements and lighting levels by computer software
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of electrical design calculations
    • Summarize electrical power and lighting design issues in meetings and presentations
    • HVAC
    • Calculate building and occupant loads for heating and cooling
    • Determine size and select HVAC equipment according to building and occupant loads for heating and cooling
    • Explain sustainable and energy conscious design provided in architectural and engineering details
    • Explain HVAC cost ramifications
    • Explain HVAC engineering alternatives
    • Knowledge of HVAC design evident in the details
    • Demonstrate an awareness of clients’ program in the HVAC design
    • Appropriate application of computer design
    • Plumbing and Fire Protection
    • Develop plumbing and fire protection systems that are compatible with architectural design requirements and other engineering disciplines
    • Analyze and where appropriate, incorporate LEED qualified design principles into the plumbing systems design
    • Develop appropriate plumbing and fire suppression systems drawings and specifications to indicate the impact of all of the buildings’ attributes on the systems design and utility connections to the building and property. Appropriate detailed drawings in selected areas to indicate knowledge of how a final contract document should represent the intended system design
    • Knowledge of plumbing systems design principles, including site drainage, building water supply, wastewater disposal, and storm water systems is evident in the plumbing plans and details
    • Knowledge of fire suppression systems design principles is evident in fire suppression plans and details
    • Calculate and analyze the sizing of supply and drainage piping and the sizing and selection of equipment for plumbing system components
    • Calculate and analyze the sizing of fire sprinkler piping and the sizing and selection of fire suppression components
    • Demonstrate an ability to reflect on prerequisite course material and to research other resources and to apply that knowledge to resolve project design issues
    • Explain plumbing and fire suppression system design options and circumstantial building design issues in a professional and intellectual manner
    • Construction Management
    • Formulate effective site mobilization and project safety
    • Formulate project cash flow requirements
    • Knowledge of construction scheduling evident
    • Formulate complete line item and summary construction costs
    • Devise Management Information Systems plan that is effective and project appropriate
    • Appropriate application of computer tools
    • Applications of value engineering and constructability principles is evident

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Completion of all lower level technical specialty course topics

    Course Topics
    • Site analysis
    • Preliminary architectural drawing and presentations
    • Architectural design development drawings
    • Preliminary engineering (structural, environmental, electrical) systems analysis
    • Code Review
    • LEED Analysis
    • Preliminary budget analysis
    • Project scheduling
    • Ongoing project management responsibilities
    • Presentation to clients and other professionals

    Laboratory Topics
    • See course topics-lab is integrated into design studio work

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 4731 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project III

    1 lecture hours 3 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the final course in the senior project series, a continuation of the team-taught senior project. Emphasis is on the design-build process and the interdisciplinary team of students to utilize their respective engineering design specialty courses or construction management expertise. This course emphasizes the engineering design and construction project management work begun in AE 4721 /CM 4721 . The topics in this course include (1) analysis and calculations for all engineering systems; (2) continued constructability analysis and value engineering; (3) life cycle cost analysis; (4) construction quality control systems; (5) project scheduling, estimating; (6) ongoing project management; and (7) project startup procedures. Students also make a presentation to industrialists in defense of their engineering design or CM project analysis. Note: Four-year BSAE students must register for AE 4731; four-year BSCM students must register for CM 4731 ; five-year BSAE/BSCM two-degree students must register for AE 4731 in year four and for CM 4731  in year five of their programs. The three-course sequence, 4712/4721/4731, must be taken in consecutive quarters during the same academic year. (prereq: senior standing, AE 4721 ) (coreq: AE 4733 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop an entire design-build project from conceptualization to final design. Factors evaluated will be design, architectural and engineering systems and analysis, construction feasibility, selection of methods for construction, schedule, budget, logistics, and economics
    • Reinforce the students’ knowledge of their (a) specialty area(s) in Architectural Engineering or (b) Construction Management
    • Continue to develop presentation and communication skills
    • Develop pseudo industry work relationships using the student and faculty team approach
    • Reinforcement of team approach in a design-build project environment
    • Individual specialty outcomes:
    • Structural
    • Determine structural systems compatible with architectural design and other engineering disciplines
    • Identify structural loadings and other structural design criteria
    • Explain lateral force resisting systems
    • Knowledge of structural design evident in structural plans
    • Knowledge of structural design evident in structural details
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural analysis by hand
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural analysis by computer programs
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of structural design calculations
    • Explain structural design and behavior issues in meetings and presentations
    • Electrical
    • Develop electrical power systems to be compatible with architectural design and other engineering disciplines
    • Explain electrical lighting systems and daylighting considerations
    • Explain building sustainability issues with respect to electrical design
    • Explain emergency systems, egress lighting, exit signs, and fire alarm systems/pumps
    • Explain auxiliary electrical systems, telephone, data, CATV, central clock, and PA/intercom systems
    • Calculate building power requirements by hand
    • Calculate power requirements and lighting levels by computer software
    • Appropriate use and knowledge of electrical design calculations
    • Summarize electrical power and lighting design issues in meetings and presentations
    • HVAC
    • Calculate building and occupant loads for heating and cooling
    • Determine size and select HVAC equipment according to building and occupant loads for heating and cooling
    • Explain sustainable and energy conscious design provided in architectural and engineering details
    • Explain HVAC cost ramifications
    • Explain HVAC engineering alternatives
    • Knowledge of HVAC design evident in the details
    • Demonstrate an awareness of clients’ program in the HVAC design
    • Appropriate application of computer design
    • Plumbing and Fire Protection
    • Develop plumbing and fire protection systems that are compatible with architectural design requirements and other engineering disciplines
    • Analyze and where appropriate, incorporate LEED qualified design principles into the plumbing systems design
    • Develop appropriate plumbing and fire suppression systems drawings and specifications to indicate the impact of all of the buildings’ attributes on the systems design and utility connections to the building and property. Appropriate detailed drawings in selected areas to indicate knowledge of how a final contract document should represent the intended system design
    • Knowledge of plumbing systems design principles, including site drainage, building water supply, wastewater disposal, and storm water systems is evident in the plumbing plans and details
    • Knowledge of fire suppression systems design principles is evident in fire suppression plans and details
    • Calculate and analyze the sizing of supply and drainage piping and the sizing and selection of equipment for plumbing system components
    • Calculate and analyze the sizing of fire sprinkler piping and the sizing and selection of fire suppression components
    • Demonstrate an ability to reflect on prerequisite course material and to research other resources and to apply that knowledge to resolve project design issues
    • Explain plumbing and fire suppression system design options and circumstantial building design issues in a professional and intellectual manner
    • Construction Management
    • Formulate effective site mobilization and project safety
    • Formulate project cash flow requirements
    • Knowledge of construction scheduling evident
    • Formulate complete line item and summary construction costs
    • Devise Management Information Systems plan that is effective and project appropriate
    • Appropriate application of computer tools
    • Applications of value engineering and constructability principles is evident

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Completion of all lower level technical specialty course topics

    Course Topics
    • Analysis and calculations for all engineering systems
    • Continued constructability analysis and value engineering
    • Life cycle cost analysis
    • Construction quality control systems
    • Project scheduling, estimating
    • Ongoing project management
    • Project startup procedures, students also make a presentation to industrialists in defense of their engineering design or CM project analysis

    Laboratory Topics
    • See course topics-lab is integrated into design studio work

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 4733 - AE Senior Project Working Drawings

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course integrates previous studies in materials, construction methods, structural systems, mechanical systems, specifications and architectural design to produce a full set of detailed construction drawings. The project will utilize the student’s design from AE 4721 . (prereq: AE 4721 , AE 4712 ) (coreq: AE 4731 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • From schematic drawings, produce a final set of drawings that could be shown to a potential employer, which illustrates the student’s drawing ability, and knowledge of the application of building materials to commercial / industrial construction
    • Develop a set of contract documents, including floor plans, site plan, elevations, building sections, details, schedules, and specifications
    • Develop a team “plan of attack”
    • Sketch any part of the required architectural drawings in freehand, plan, elevation, or isometric view
    • Establish and maintain a log of hours, which reflects the amount of time required to produce a set of contract documents
    • Utilize recognized construction industry communication forms, procedures and symbols
    • Utilize building codes and standards as they relate to their design solution
    • Understand drawings and their interrelationships with your design specialty, along with their relationship to the specifications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Sketching ability
    • Architectural graphics skills
    • Properties and strength of materials
    • Basic concepts of building systems-architectural, structural, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical

    Course Topics
    • Course overview and standards, assignment of projects and research
    • Code and zoning analysis
    • Steps to working drawings; project organization and scheduling; sheet organization; sheet layout, floor plans, elevations, building sections, details, schedules
    • Development of details schedules and plans
    • Check set
    • Final coordination
    • Final submittals include all working drawings, schedules, and sketches of architectural elements and details of log of hours

    Coordinator
    Michael McGeen
  
  • AE 4980 - Special Topics in Architectural Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers topics in Architectural Engineering that are not covered in other classes. Topics and structure may vary depending on the mutual interest of faculty and students. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Vary by topics covered

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Vary by topics chosen

    Course Topics
    • Vary by topics covered

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Raebel
  
  • AE 5210 - Matrix Structural Analysis

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the matrix stiffness method of structural analysis. Topics include analysis of trusses, beams, and frames; coordinate transformation; equivalent nodal loads; and computerized analysis with emphasis on structural modeling and verification of results. (prereq: AE 3211  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5220 - AISC Steel Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents advanced topics in design of steel structures. Topics include plate girder design; column and frame design; bracing design; connection design; and advanced floor serviceability. (prereq: AE 3221  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5232 - Prestressed Concrete Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the behavior and design of prestressed concrete members and structures. Topics include PCI and ACI design criteria; flexural member design; compression member design; beam-column member design; and connection design. (prereq: AE 3231  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5234 - Foundation Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the design of foundation systems. Topics include design of shallow foundations for axial, flexural, and shear forces; design of anchorage in concrete; design of retaining walls for lateral and gravity forces; design of slabs on grade and pavement; design of piers and piles; and design of pile caps with the strut and tie method. (prereq: AE 3231  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5240 - Masonry Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines design of unreinforced and reinforced masonry structures. Topics include lintels; walls subjected to out-of-plane and in-plane loads; detailing, allowable stress design and strength design. (prereq: AE 3231  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5250 - Wood Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the behavior and design of wood structures. Topics include sawn beam and column design; engineered wood beam and column design; design of plywood floors, diaphragms, and shear walls; and connection design. (prereq: AE 3201  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5260 - Bridge Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents structural analysis and design of highway bridges. Topics include construction materials in bridges; loads on highway bridges; load path and distribution in bridge superstructure; design of single-span and multi-span highway bridges including rolled steel girder bridges with concrete deck, flat slab bridges, and box culverts; and bridge aesthetics. (prereq: AE 3231  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5262 - Modern Structural Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the selection of structural systems for performance, cost and constructability, and resistance to gravity and lateral loads. (prereq: AE 3201  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5402 - Building Mechanical System Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers fundamentals of building mechanical systems including HVAC, plumbing, and fire protection applications. Topics include psychrometric relationships; basic heating load and cooling load calculations; fundamentals of Air-Water, All-Air, All-Water systems; constant air volume and variable air volume systems; ASHRAE Standards; water supply system sizing; plumbing fixtures and components; sanitary drainage systems, sewage treatment and disposal; and storm drainage systems; fire science; fire safety design; fire detection and fire alarm systems; fire suppression systems; automatic sprinkler systems and smoke control principles; and applicable codes and standards for plumbing and fire protection systems. (prereq: AE 3622  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5404 - Building Electrical System Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the design of building power, illumination, and communication systems. Topics include components and behavior of power systems; lighting strategies; and communication technology. (prereq: AE 3421  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5450 - Building Control System Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces automatic control issues related to energy conservation; indoor air quality; and thermal comfort in buildings. Topics include classification of HVAC control systems; control systems software and hardware; and selection and sizing of sensors, actuators, and controllers. (prereq: AE 3451  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5460 - Commissioning

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the process of commissioning buildings for use and occupancy. The course covers processes that can be verified by one-time measurements with hand-held measuring devices and the ones requiring short-term and long-term monitoring, verification, and analyses. Topics include commissioning of HVAC, plumbing, electrical, and communication systems; commissioning planning; and recommissioning. (prereq: AE 3422  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5470 - Advanced Project Management for MEP

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students gain a working knowledge of project management necessary to be successful within the mechanical/electrical contracting industry. The course incorporates codes, contract documents, productivity, coordination, project control and administration, scheduling, safety and project close-out to provide a strong foundation of effective project management from a specialty contracting perspective. (prereq: CM 4311 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 5520 - Advanced Plumbing Systems Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the specialized plumbing systems needed for modern large commercial and residential structures including high-rise buildings. Topics include system design for dynamic conditions; specialized waste handling systems; commissioning, operations, maintenance, and troubleshooting of installed systems; and assessing existing systems. (prereq: AE 3521  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 5600 - Electrical Code for Buildings

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course highlights the electrical code as it applies to building projects.  Students will review the applicable rules for power systems, emergency backup power systems, distribution systems as well as for solar PV systems. Focus will be on the application of the code on the electrical design of these systems. (prereq: AE 3601  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 5630 - Advanced Building Illumination Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers advanced design of building illumination systems. Students will look at lighting design techniques for buildings such as office lighting, hospitality lighting, museum lighting, lighting for senior and health care environments, and daylighting strategies. (prereq: AE 3601  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 6210 - Applied Finite Elements

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the application of the finite element method to building analysis. Topics include element stiffness matrices for beam, plate, shell and continuum elements; solution of equations; material models for steel and concrete; boundary conditions; and applied loading. (prereq: AE 5210  or CV 5210 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6212 - Structural Dynamics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces analysis of single degree of freedom systems; multi-degree of freedom Systems; free vibration analysis; forced system response; analysis of earthquake loading; and modal analysis. (prereq: AE 5210  or CV 5210 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6214 - Lateral Loads on Structural Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on determining earthquake and wind loads on structures. Topics include basis for code procedures; code characterization of loads; code assumptions of elastic versus inelastic behavior; and detailing for inelastic response. (prereq: AE 6212  or CV 6212 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6216 - Structural Stability

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents structural stability analysis for members and multistory frames. Topics include torsional buckling of beams; plate buckling; modeling structural stability with the finite element method; and post-buckling behavior. (prereq: AE 6210  or CV 6210 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6222 - AISI Steel Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents cold-formed structural steel properties and design of cold-formed steel structural members using LRFD methodology published by AISI. Topics include flexural members; compression members; beam-columns; connections; and cold-formed steel shear diaphragms for residential construction. (prereq: AE 6216  or CV 6216 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6224 - Connection Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the design of connections between structural members with emphasis on connecting hot-rolled steel members. Topics include overview of connection design; limit states; connection selection; shear connections; moment connections; partially restrained connections; bracing connections; and design of special connections for earthquake loading. (prereq: AE 5220  or CV 5220 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6230 - Reinforced Concrete Structure Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the design of reinforced concrete floor systems.  Topics include design of pan joists systems, design of two way slabs and flat plate floors, ACI Direct Design and Equivalent Frame methods, connection design, and commercial structural design software. (prereq: graduate standing; AE 3231  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 6410 - Data Driven Modeling

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the data-driven modeling, or inverse modeling, approach to building energy simulation, which requires actual building monitored data to establish the causal modality of the building energy use behavior, using various statistical modeling approaches. Topics include fundamentals of the statistical methods required; fundamentals of building energy monitoring; intrinsic problems in monitored data; understanding and interpretation of models’ predictions by calculating variability, bias, and level of uncertainty; and ASHRAE Guideline 14. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6412 - Building Energy Simulations

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on elements of building energy simulations. An introduction and study of building energy assessment principles and protocols for new and existing commercial buildings. Course topics include hands-on techniques of energy measurement and verification, indoor environmental quality parameter identification and measurement, and energy metric comparison/analysis for the application and submission of a building disclosure, rating and labeling program. The course will also focus on energy modeling to inform and guide design of a new commercial building. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    David Grassl
  
  • AE 6440 - Sustainable Built Environment

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    How sustainable construction materials and methods contribute to meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs; identify and analyze those international, national, and local programs promoting sustainable construction; characterize the components of successful sustainable construction projects; analyzes design as well as construction aspects of Green Building and LEED certification; project strategies to achieve LEED certification; industry ecology, construction environment impact studies. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6461 - Life Cycle Assessment of Building and Infrastructure Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Life cycle assessment and costing allow the engineer to effectively model both the environmental and economic impacts of a building or infrastructure system. Topics covered include 1) an introduction to the ISO 14040 Life Cycle Assessment protocols for quantifying environmental life cycle impacts, 2) introduction to the Economic Input Output (EIO) method for quantifying environmental life cycle impacts, 3) a review of life cycle cost modelling using the net present value technique and applied specifically to green building and infrastructure projects as a means to justify potentially higher first costs of such projects, 4) a survey of green rating systems such as LEED, Green Globes, and Envision and discussion of how these rating systems incorporate the principles of life cycle assessment, 5) introduction to risk management as applied to green building and infrastructure projects, with particular emphasis on how risks affect the life cycle cost modelling for such projects, 6) strategies for quantifying uncertainties in the life cycle cost modelling of green building and infrastructure projects, including use of Monte Carlo simulation, 7) an introduction to software packages used to assist in LCA modelling, and 8) building and infrastructure case studies of life cycle assessment and life cycle cost modelling. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
        See Graduate Catalog
    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 6560 - Water Reuse Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will explore the expanding field of water reuse systems.  Both centralized and decentralized systems will be studied. The full range of non-potable reuse, indirect potable reuse, and direct potable reuse will be explored. Students will be expected to design a water reuse system for either a centralized or decentralized scenario. Lectures will focus on water treatment technologies as they are typically applied to water reuse systems.  (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
      See Graduate Catalog   
    Coordinator
    Doug Nelson
  
  • AE 6570 - Air Quality in Buildings

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on elements of indoor air quality. Topics include the physical and chemical characteristics of contaminants in indoor air; source of contaminants (indoor generation and outdoor pollutants in ventilation air), health effects of contaminants; ASHRAE Standard 62 (Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Quality); and the calculations to show building design code compliance. (prereq: graduate standing; AE 5402  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6590 - District Energy Mechanical Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course evaluates district energy as a part of integrated systems that provide one or more forms of thermal energy or a combination of thermal energy and electric power from a central plant(s) to meet the heating, cooling, or combined thermal energy and power needs of end-users. The course will cover the design, performance, operation and maintenance, transmission and distribution networks, heat transfer, fluid flow, and measurement of thermal energy from district energy systems in addition to covering the environmental impacts compared to on site generation at each facility. This course will also stress the coordination and integration with electric district energy system components typically housed within on the same site.  (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    David Grassl
  
  • AE 6630 - Advanced Building Illumination Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers design of building illumination systems.  Topics include qualities of daylight and artificial light; lamp characteristics; control devices; energy conservation techniques; and design of lighting systems. (prereq: graduate standing; AE 5404  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 6690 - District Electrical Energy Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course evaluates district energy as a part of integrated systems that provide electrical power from a central plant(s) to meet the power needs of end-users. The course will cover the design, performance, operation and maintenance of the power generation and transmission and distribution networks from district energy systems. This course will also stress the coordination and integration with mechanical district energy system components typically housed within on the same site.  (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    Christine Brotz
  
  • AE 7999 - Independent Study

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Independent study allows a student with a particular interest in a topic to undertake additional work outside of the classroom format. The student works under the supervision of a faculty member and undertakes studies that typically lead to a report. A maximum of six credits of independent study may be applied to a Master of Science in Architectural Engineering degree; credits for independent study may not be transferred from other institutions.  (prereq: consent of MSAE program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the independent study topic.

    Course Topics
    • Determined by student and faculty advisor

    Coordinator
    Dr. Deborah Jackman
  
  • AE 8000 - Research and Presentation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents research, critical reading, and technical presentation (written and oral) skills needed by a practicing architectural engineer. The student will select a topic relevant to architectural engineering and conduct literature research or other research on that topic.  The student will present the results of the research with a written technical report. The student will also give an oral presentation on the results of the research.   (prereq: consent of MSAE program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 8900 - Capstone Project I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of a three-course sequence (with AE 8910 and AE 8920) which comprise the independent capstone project of the Master of Science in Architectural Engineering program. The student will complete a project that presents a comprehensive solution to an architectural engineering problem. The problem is to be formulated by the student under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The project may be based on the student’s industrial experience, consist of physical research, or consist of an analytic solution. The project must be approved by the Master of Science in Architectural Engineering program director and the CAECM Department chairperson.  Satisfactory progress and completion of the capstone project is to be determined by an academic committee consisting of the faculty advisor and two faculty members. This course is graded on a S/U basis.   (prereq: consent of MSAE Program Director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 8910 - Capstone Project II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of a three-course sequence (with AE 8900 and AE 8920) which comprise the independent capstone project of the Master of Science in Architectural Engineering program (see AE 8900).  Satisfactory progress and completion of the capstone project is to be determined by an academic committee consisting of the faculty advisor and two faculty members. This course is graded on a S/U basis.   (prereq: AE 8900 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • AE 8920 - Capstone Project III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the third of a three-course sequence (with AE 8900 and AE 8910) which comprise the independent capstone project of the Master of Science in Architectural Engineering program (see AE 8900).  Satisfactory progress and completion of the capstone project is to be determined by an academic committee consisting of the faculty advisor and two faculty members. The student will receive a letter grade for this course.   (prereq: AE 8910 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog

Air Force

  
  • AF 1011 - United States Air Force Heritage and Values I

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    AF1011 students receive an introductory look into the United States Air Force. The curriculum touches on topics assignments such as general aspects of the Department of the Air Force, AF Leadership, Air Force benefits, and opportunities for AF officers. Key concepts presented in this course are:Air Force core values, formation of the Air Force, dress and appearance, customs and courtesies, public speaking, benefits of service, intro to leadership, the evolution of the Air Force, principles of war and tenets of airpower, Department of the Air Force, ethical decision-making, Air Force major commands, and what the Air Force brings to the fight. (prereq: none) (coreq: students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Course Topics
    • Air Force core values
    • Formation of the Air Force
    • Dress and appearance
    • Customs and courtesies
    • Public speaking
    • Benefits of service
    • Intro to leadership
    • The evolution of the Air Force
    • Principles of war and tenets of airpower
    • Department of the Air Force
    • Ethical decision-making
    • Air Force major commands
    • What the Air Force brings to the fight

    Laboratory Topics
    The purpose of the LLAB program is to augment the AFROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the leadership, managerial, and supervisory skills required of successful Air Force officers.
  
  • AF 1012 - United States Air Force Heritage and Values II

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 1011 . Open to all students. (prereq: AF 1011  or consent of department chair) (coreq: students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 1013 - United States Air Force Heritage and Values III

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 1012 . Open to all students. (prereq: AF 1012  or consent of department chair) (coreq: students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 1051 - Leadership Laboratory

    0 lecture hours 4 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Leadership Laboratory augments the Air Force ROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the followership, leadership, teamwork and managerial skills required of successful Air Force officers. The class length is four hours per week including two hours of physical fitness held at MSOE. SNC/UNC grade assessment. For students pursuing an Air Force commission. All students pursuing Air Force commission must register for this course.
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AF 2021 - Team and Leadership Fundamentals I

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    AF 2021 gives students an introductory look at leadership and team building through group assignments, classroom activities, and examination of past Air Force leaders and how they navigated the complicated road of military leadership. Key concepts such as listening, followership, full-range leadership, problem solving, standards and accountability, building teams, conflict management, human relations, and ethical decision making. Offered fall term. (prereq: AF 1011 , AF 1012 , AF 1013 ; can be taken concurrently with instructor’s consent) (coreq: Students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. Students are taught from the beginning that there are many layers to leadership, including aspects that don’t always jump to mind.  Such things include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower and problem solving efficiently. The students will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management.  Students should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills.  Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows AF 2121.
    Laboratory Topics
    The purpose of the LLAB program is to augment the AFROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the leadership, managerial, and supervisory skills required of successful Air Force officers.
  
  • AF 2022 - Team and Leadership Fundamentals II

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 2021 . Open to all students. (prereq: AF 2021  or consent of department chair)  (co-req: Students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 2023 - Team and Leadership Fundamentals III

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 2022 . Open to all students. (prereq: AF 2022  or consent of department chair) (coreq: Students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 2964 - Air Force Field Training

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Off-campus summer program held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery, Alabama. Provides practical leadership experience and extensive practical training in fundamental leadership and military skills. Students pursuing an Air Force Commission are competitively selected for this course. Offered only during the summer. S/U grade assessment. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • None appended

  
  • AF 3131 - Leading People and Effective Communication I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    AF 3131 curriculum enhances hands-on leadership laboratory experience by relating key leadership concepts in a classroom/lecture setting. Key concepts such as effective followership/leadership, effective supervision, understanding bias, team dynamics, diversity, critical thinking, ethical decision making, change management, mentoring, effective feedback, stress management and resiliency, creating a vision, and organizational climate are taught in this course. (prereq: AF 1011 , AF 1012 , AF 1013 ; AF 2021 , AF 2022 , AF 2023  or instructor’s consent) (coreq: All students pursuing Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Course Topics
    • Effective followership/leadership
    • Effective supervision
    • Understanding bias
    • Team dynamics
    • Diversity
    • Critical thinking
    • Ethical decision making
    • Change management
    • Mentoring
    • Effective feedback
    • Stress management and resiliency
    • Creating a vision
    • Organizational climate

    Laboratory Topics
    The purpose of the LLAB program is to augment the AFROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the leadership, managerial, and supervisory skills required of successful Air Force officers.
  
  • AF 3132 - Leading People and Effective Communication II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 3131 . (prereq: AF 3131  or consent of department chair) (coreq: All students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 3133 - Leading People and Effective Communication III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 3132 . (prereq: AF 3132  or consent of department chair) (coreq: All students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 4141 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    AF 4141 examines the basic elements of national security policy and process, air and space power operations, selected roles of the military in society, and current domestic and international issues affecting the military profession. Special topics of interest focus on responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander, selected provisions of the military justice system, base agencies, sexual assault prevention and response, suicide prevention, bullet writing, pay/allowances/leave, and retirement benefits. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to the refinement of communication skills. (prereq: AF 1011 , AF 1012 , AF 1013 , AF 2021 , AF 2022 , AF 2023 , AF 3131 , AF 3132 , AF 3133  or instructor’s consent) (coreq: Students pursuing an Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Course Topics
    • Responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander
    • Selected provisions of the military justice system
    • Base agencies
    • Sexual assault prevention and response
    • Suicide prevention
    • Bullet writing
    • Pay/allowances/leave and retirement benefits

    Laboratory Topics
    The purpose of the LLAB program is to augment the AFROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the leadership, managerial, and supervisory skills required of successful Air Force officers.
  
  • AF 4142 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 4141 . (All students pursuing Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 ).
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 4143 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Continuation of AF 4142 . (prereq: AF 4142  or consent of department chair) (coreq: All students pursuing Air Force commission must also be concurrently enrolled in AF 1051 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  
  • AF 4995 - Independent Study in Air Force and Aerospace Studies

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Independent study of special topics in Aerospace Studies under faculty supervision. Topics selected by student/faculty conference. (prereq: consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies depending on topic

 

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