Jun 17, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Engineering

  
  • CE 4970 - Topics in Computer Engineering with Laboratory

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in computer engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Eric Durant

Chemistry

  
  • CH 103 - Principles of Chemistry

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is intended to provide students in nontechnical fields with the fundamentals in chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, and properties of matter and solutions. This course satisfies the science laboratory portion of the general education requirement. Not for credit for students who have credit in CH 200 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or CH 310 . (prereq: MA 125  or two years of high school algebra)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Classify and predict selected properties of elements using the periodic table
    • Describe the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons, electrons, and energy levels
    • Understand the concept of the mole and to use it to solve stoichiometry problems
    • Describe and explain the behavior of substances using the concepts of chemical and physical change, chemical and physical properties, elements, compounds, mixtures, and the three common states of matter
    • Solve selected problems involving concentrations of solutions
    • Understand chemistry laboratory procedures and be able to handle chemicals safely
    • Collect and organize laboratory data
    • Communicate laboratory results and conclusions with appropriate technical writing skills
    • Recognize and apply key features of the scientific method to an investigation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Classification and properties (chemical and physical) of matter
    • Atomic structure
    • Chemical equation and stoichiometry
    • The formation of compounds from atoms, chemical bonding
    • Gaseous state of matter, gas laws and chemical reactions
    • Liquid state and concentrations of solutions, acids, and bases
    • Solid state, elements of crystal structure, and properties of solids, metallurgy

    Laboratory Topics
    • Density and specific gravity
    • Spectrophotometric determination of copper
    • Metallurgy
    • Determination of iron content in food
    • Determination of formulae
    • Types of chemical reactions
    • Sequence of chemical reaction
    • Determination of atomic weight of aluminum
    • Determination of the molecular weight of a volatile liquid

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 199 - Project in Chemistry

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Students are given the opportunity to pursue an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled course work. This may take the form of individual or small group studies, literature surveys, and laboratory or research projects. Weekly meetings with the course advisor are required. A final report to be filed in the Physics and Chemistry Department may also be required. This course is offered to students with freshman or sophomore standing and may be taken for variable credit. Students with junior or senior standing should request CH 499 . This course is offered to students with freshman or sophomore standing and may be taken for variable credit. (prereq: consent of the course coordinator and the department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have had the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Have broadened his/her scientific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • To be determined

    Laboratory Topics
    • Depends on topic selected

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 200 - Chemistry I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is a general chemistry course for students in engineering and nursing degree programs. Students will design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data and relate experimental results to theoretical understandings of chemical phenomena. Specifically, students will more thoroughly understand such subjects as atomic structure, periodic properties, basic chemical calculations, nomenclature, intra- and intermolecular forces, kinetic molecular theory, properties of gases, and solutions. Not for credit for students who have credit for CH 103 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or CH 310 . (prereq: one year of high school chemistry with a grade of B or better.)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Plan and create structured experiments
    • Write proficiently in technical communications
    • In a laboratory experiment, identify potential procedural errors
    • Differentiate between precision and accuracy
    • Interpret data to isolate trends
    • Use the periodic table to determine electron configurations, trends in atomic radii, trends in ionic radii, ionization energy, electron affinity, and electronegativity
    • Describe the formation and properties of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding, including Lewis dot structures
    • Predict Lewis dot structures, molecular geometry, and molecular polarity for molecules and polyatomic ions
    • Compare melting points, solubility and other physical properties for molecules using intermolecular forces
    • Apply the law of conservation of mass to solve stoichiometric problems, including limited reagent problems
    • Employ the gas laws, the kinetic theory of gases and gas stoichometry
    • Explain the energy considerations in material changes, both physical and chemical
    • Use solution chemistry, including molarity, dilutions, pH, acid-base properties

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • One year high school chemistry

    Course Topics
    • Classification and properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic relationships, etc.
    • Chemical bonding, Lewis dot structure, molecular geometry and dipole moments and intermolecular forces
    • Gases
    • Mass and enthalpy relationships in chemical reactions
    • Solutions, molarity, pH

    Laboratory Topics
    • Physical and chemical changes
    • Density
    • Properties of solids (ionic, molecular, metallic)
    • Solution concentration and Beer’s law
    • Identification of a molecular unknown (intermolecular forces)
    • Determination of the atomic mass of aluminum (gas laws)
    • Determination of the enthalpy of a reaction
    • Molecular geometry and bonding
    • Stoichometry and limiting reactants

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne Alexander
  
  • CH 200A - Chemistry I

    4 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is a general chemistry course for students in engineering and nursing degree programs. Students will design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data and relate experimental results to theoretical understandings of chemical phenomena. Specifically, students will more thoroughly understand such subjects as basic chemical calculations, nomenclature, atomic structure, intra- and intermolecular forces, kinetic molecular theory, properties of gases, and solutions. Not for credit for students who have credit for CH 100, CH 103 , CH 310 , CH 200  or CH 200B . This course is designed for students who did not take chemistry in high school or need a refresher course because they took a chemistry class more than five years ago. (prereq: the course is for students without a background in chemistry)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Plan and create structured experiments
    • Write proficiently in technical communications
    • State potential procedural errors, differentiating between precision and accuracy, after conducting a laboratory experiment
    • Interpret data and isolate trends
    • Write chemical names based on chemical formula and vice versa
    • Write chemical reaction equations
    • Explain their understanding of the periodic table including, electron configurations, trends in atomic radii, ionization energy, electron affinity, and electronegativity
    • Describe and illustrate the formation and properties of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding, including Lewis dot structures
    • Describe and illustrate molecules using molecular geometry
    • Explain the difference between intramolecular and intermolecular forces
    • Explain the law of conservation of mass and solve stoichiometric problems, including limited reagent and percent yield
    • State the gas laws including the kinetic theory of gases and solve gas law stoichiometry
    • Understand the energy considerations in material changes, both physical and chemical/endothermic vs. exothermic
    • Understand colligative properties of solution including solubility of gases
    • Understand solution chemistry, including molarity, dilutions, pH, acid-base properties

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Nomenclature (naming compounds)
    • Dimensional analysis and stoichiometry
    • Mass relationships and chemical reactions
    • Solutions, molarity, pH and solubility of gases
    • Classification and properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic relationships, etc.
    • Chemical bonding, Lewis dot structure, molecular geometry, dipole moments and polarity
    • Properties of gasses
    • Heat of reaction-endothermic and exothermic reactions

    Laboratory Topics
    • Determination of percent recovery of metal
    • Determination of chemical formula of hydrates
    • Determination of unknown compound via physical properties
    • Gases- Charles’ law
    • Determination of the atomic mass of aluminum
    • Determination of the heat of reaction
    • Intermolecular forces
    • Determination of composition of a mixture

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne Alexander
  
  • CH 200B - Chemistry I

    4 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is a general chemistry course for students in engineering and nursing degree programs. Students will design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data and relate experimental results to theoretical understandings of chemical phenomena. Specifically, students will more thoroughly understand such subjects as basic chemical calculations, nomenclature, atomic structure, intra- and intermolecular forces, kinetic molecular theory, properties of gases, and solutions. Not for credit for students who have credit for CH 103 , CH 310 , CH 200  or CH 200A . This course is designed for students who did not take chemistry in high school or need a refresher course because they took a chemistry class more than five years ago. This course is for students without a background in chemistry. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Plan and create structured experiments
    • Write proficiently in technical communications
    • In a laboratory experiment, identify potential procedural errors
    • Differentiate between precision and accuracy
    • Interpret data to isolate trends
    • Use the periodic table to determine electron configurations, trends in atomic radii, trends in ionic radii, ionization energy, electron affinity, and electronegativity
    • Describe the formation and properties of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding, including Lewis dot structures
    • Predict Lewis dot structures, molecular geometry, and molecular polarity for molecules and polyatomic ions
    • Compare melting points, solubility and other physical properties for molecules using intermolecular forces
    • Apply the law of conservation of mass to solve stoichiometric problems, including limited reagent problems
    • Employ the gas laws, the kinetic theory of gases and gas stoichometry
    • Explain the energy considerations in material changes, both physical and chemical
    • Explain colligative properties of solutions including solubility of gases
    • Use solution chemistry, including molarity, dilutions, pH, acid-base properties

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No prerequisites by topic appended

    Course Topics
    • Nomenclature (naming compounds)
    • Dimensional analysis and stoichiometry
    • Mass relationships and chemical reactions
    • Solutions, molarity, pH and solubility of gases
    • Classification and properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic relationships, etc.
    • Chemical bonding, Lewis dot structure, molecular geometry, dipole moments and polarity
    • Properties of gasses
    • Heat of reaction-endothermic and exothermic reactions

    Laboratory Topics
    • Density
    • Determination of chemical formula of compounds
    • Determination of unknown compound via physical properties
    • Determination of the atomic mass of aluminum
    • Determination of the heat of reaction
    • Intermolecular forces
    • Determination of composition of a mixture

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne-Marie Nickel
  
  • CH 201 - Chemistry II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This general chemistry course is a continuation of CH 200  for students in engineering programs and students interested in chemistry. Students will design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data and relate experimental results to theoretical understandings of chemical phenomena. Corrosion, electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction, types of solids, semiconductors, crystalline materials, rates of reactions, acid-base theory, buffers, and chemical equilibria are covered. Optional topics covered might include a description of electrical conductivity in electrical insulators, semiconductors, and conductors. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A  or CH 200B )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Plan and create structured experiments; conduct an experiment properly; collect appropriate data and observations, and analyze and interpret data
    • Qualitatively predict chemical equilibria and quantitatively perform equilibria calculations
    • Identify and compare solid structures and their physical properties
    • Explain and quantify the molecular level changes that occur during oxidation reduction reactions, corrosion; the operation of an electrochemical cell; and acid dissociation, base dissociation, hydrolysis, solubility, precipitation, neutralization and buffer systems
    • Describe typical sizes of atoms, molecules, and bonds
    • Explain at the molecular level how temperature, concentration, catalysts and surface area affect the rate, the rate law, and the activation energy of a reaction
    • Identify common acids, bases, and ionic compounds, including organic acids and bases

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • One quarter university level chemistry

    Course Topics
    • Corrosion
    • Oxidation-reduction
    • Galvanic cell technology
    • Electrolysis
    • Types of solids
    • Crystalline materials
    • Reaction rates and chemical change
    • Acid-base theory
    • Gas-phase equilibria
    • Buffers
    • Solution-phase equilibria

    Laboratory Topics
    • Corrosion of iron
    • Buffers
    • Rates of chemical reactions
    • Structures of solids and their properties
    • Analysis of ions
    • LeChatelier’s principle

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne-Marie Nickel
  
  • CH 222 - Organic Chemistry I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The major concepts and themes of organic chemistry are introduced in this course. Theory and laboratory work on the principles of organic chemistry, properties and interrelationships of important classes of organic compounds. The roles of such compounds in the metabolic processes are explained. Students are introduced to basic mechanisms of organic reactions and alerted to the industrial, biomedical, academic and personal applications and uses of organic materials. (prereq: CH 200  or CH 200A  or CH 200B )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Relate chemical bonding to molecular shape
    • Identify and name types of aliphatic hydrocarbons and have a knowledge of their properties, reactions, preparation and commercial applications
    • Identify and name types of aromatic hydrocarbons and have a knowledge of their properties, reactions, preparation and commercial applications
    • Classify organic compounds by their functional groups and have knowledge of their reactivities, and commercial applications
    • Understand the interrelationship of organic reactions with those of the human body and the metabolic processes essential to body function
    • Understand the safe handling of organic chemicals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Polarity
    • Dipole moment
    • Polar and non-polar covalent bonds
    • Electronegativity

    Course Topics
    • Review of basic chemical concepts – shapes of molecules, bonding, isomerism, resonance, hybridization (3 classes)
    • Alkanes and cycloalkanes - nomenclature, properties, synthesis, reactions (3 classes)
    • Alkenes and Alkynes - nomenclature, properties, synthesis, reactions (2 classes)
    • Aromatic and heterocyclic compounds - nomenclature, properties, synthesis, reactions (2 classes)
    • Alcohols, esters, phenols, thiols - nomenclature, physical and chemical properties, reactions (2 classes)
    • Aldehydes and ketones - nomenclature, properties, reactions, preparations (2 classes)
    • Carboxylic acids - structure, properties, nomenclature, reactions (2 classes)
    • Derivates of carboxylic acids - nomenclature, properties, reactions and applications (2 classes)
    • Amines - properties, nomenclature, reactions, preparations. Study of naturally occurring and biogenic amines (2 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Laboratory techniques part I-liquid-liquid extraction and melting point, refluxing and TLC (4 hours total)
    • Laboratory techniques part II-simple distillation and estimation of boiling point
    • Nomenclature and functional groups of organic compounds, structure representation
    • Properties of alcohols
    • Synthesis of salicylic acid: synthesis and start of recrystallization
    • Synthesis of aspirin: synthesis and start of recrystallization
    • Analysis of recrystallized salicylic acid and aspirin

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 223 - Biochemistry

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to train and educate students with essential and central concepts, principles and applications of biochemistry. Knowledge of biochemistry is essential in disciplines like medicine, nutrition, pharmacology, bioremediation studies, and agriculture and in several engineering fields. The three-dimensional structures of biomolecules are explored in the context of their functions and their microenvironments within living organisms and metabolism is introduced. The course enhances the ability of students to address changes, needs and demands of their own major fields as well. The lab-activity allows hands on experience on concepts taught in lecture. (prereq: CH 222 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and name different types of biomolecules, DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, etc.
    • Understand the structures and functions of the biomolecules, DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids and establish the structure-function relationship for the different biomolecules
    • Manipulate basic structural and functional concepts about biomolecules and biopolymers like nucleic acids, carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes and lipids
    • Translate the genetic code and understand the importance of single, double or multiple mutations in a genome
    • Analyze and apply the interrelationship of biochemistry reactions with those of the human body and metabolic processes essential to body functions
    • Participate in scientific conversations about biochemistry, using correct terminology, ask relevant questions in a seminar or colloquium with confidence and take part in science activities (presentations and meetings) individually or as a team member
    • Use proper and accurate basic biochemistry laboratory techniques and handle the biochemicals appropriately under a variety of circumstances
    • Handle and dispose all biochemical materials safely

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Positive and negative ions
    • Amines
    • Amides
    • Carboxylic acids
    • Acid derivatives
    • Nucleophiles
    • Electrophiles

    Course Topics
    • Proteins-structures, assembly, functions and applications (6 classes)
    • Enzymes-structures and functions (2 classes)
    • Nucleic acids-structures, functions, and applications (4 classes)
    • Genetic code, translation, gene expression (4 classes)
    • Carbohydrates-structures, functions and roles in metabolism (2 classes)
    • Lipids, steroids and hormones (2 classes)
    • Biochemistry leading to biotechnology (1 class)
    • Biochemistry seminar by guest speaker (1 class)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction to the properties of proteins
    • Introduction to carbohydrates and their qualitative analysis
    • Introduction to the properties of lipids
    • Modeling the nucleic acids: nonbonding interaction
    • Modeling the nucleic acids: replication and transcription
    • Modeling the nucleic acids: translation and mutation
    • Blood typing HIV (simulating) test
    • Chromatography of amino acids
    • Sugars

    Coordinator
    Dr. Gul Afshan
  
  • CH 302 - Chemistry III

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This elective has been designed to provide students with the third quarter of a one-year general chemistry course. This allows students to more thoroughly understand such subjects as thermochemistry, electrochemistry, solution chemistry and the chemical theories relevant to conductors, semiconductors and transition metals. CH 302, a three-credit course, allows students to meet the general chemistry requirements for graduate school and medical school when taking the CH 303  lab component (a one-credit laboratory course offered in a subsequent quarter), and specifically covers material that is normally found on the MCAT and FE/PE exams. (prereq: CH 201 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Be exposed in more depth to quantum mechanics
    • Be exposed in more depth to various topics involved in phase change
    • Understand the chemistry of transition metals including crystal field theory, molecular orbital theory and the complex ion formation
    • Understand thermodynamics including electrochemistry
    • Expand their knowledge of solution chemistry

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Two university level chemistry courses

    Course Topics
    • Quantum mechanics
    • Various topics of phase change
    • Chemistry of transition metals
    • Thermodynamics including electrochemistry
    • Solution chemistry

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 303 - Chemistry III Lab

    0 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This elective has been designed to provide students with the third-quarter lab part of a one-year general chemistry course. This allows students to more thoroughly understand such subjects as thermodynamics, the chemistry of the various phases of matter, transition metals and solution chemistry. CH 303 lab, a one-credit lab course (when taken along with CH 302 , a three-credit course), allows students to meet the general chemistry requirements for graduate school and medical school, and covers material normally found on the MCAT and FE/PE exams. (prereq: none) (coreq: CH 302 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the chemistry of transition metals including crystal field theory, molecular orbital theory, complex ion formation
    • Expand their knowledge of chemical Kinetics
    • Understand thermodynamics, including electrochemistry and entropy
    • Expand their knowledge of solutions chemistry including acid base titrations involving weak, dipriotic acids, and investigation of colligative properties
    • Be exposed in more depth to various topics involved in phase change
    • Interpret data to isolate trends
    • Identify potential procedural errors after conducting a laboratory experiment
    • Demonstrate proficiency in technical communication

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Two university level chemistry courses

    Course Topics
    • No course topics have been appended

    Laboratory Topics
    • Acid base titrations involving weak, diprotic acids
    • Coordination chemistry
    • Chemical kinetics
    • Thermodynamics
    • Colligative properties
    • Phase diagrams
    • Complex ion equilibrium
    • Electrochemistry

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 310 - Applied Chemistry

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is a junior level general chemistry course for students taking only one quarter of chemistry. The course includes classification and properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical equations, physical states of matter and intermolecular forces. The relationship between chemical properties and the mechanical and electrical properties of materials is also studied. Not for credit for students who have credit for CH 103  or CH 200 , CH 200A , or CH 200B . (prereq: MA 128 or MA 129 , PH 113 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the periodic classification of the elements
    • Understand the structure of the atom
    • Solve stoichiometry problems
    • Understand the laws governing changes in matter composition
    • Understand chemical bonding and the basic properties of solids and liquids
    • Solve selected problems involving concentrations of solutions
    • Understand and solve selected problems involving thermochemistry and electrochemical reactions
    • Understand chemistry laboratory procedures and be able to handle chemicals safely

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Classification and properties (chemical and physical) of matter
    • Atomic structure and chemical properties of the elements
    • Chemical equation and stoichiometry
    • Reactions in aqueous solutions
    • Gas laws
    • Thermochemistry and chemical equilibrium
    • Intermolecular forces
    • Electrochemistry and corrosion

    Laboratory Topics
    • Density and specific gravity
    • Determination of formulae
    • Types of chemical reactions
    • Metallurgy
    • Properties of solids
    • Enthalpy and entropy of a chemical reaction
    • Determination of the atomic weight of aluminum
    • Electrochemical cells (fuel cells)
    • The corrosion of iron

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 322 - Organic Chemistry II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This elective is specially designed to meet the organic chemistry requirements for admission to medical school. The concepts learned in this class will be useful in understanding medical biochemistry and biotechnology. The principles of organic chemistry learned in Organic Chemistry I are further developed to understand in-depth reaction mechanisms. Understanding of organic reaction mechanisms will be useful in learning roles of organic molecules involved in various metabolic processes in living systems at molecular level. Organic chemistry is of immense commercial importance. It is the chemistry of dyes and drugs, paper and ink, paints and plastics, gasoline and rubber tires, the food we eat and the clothing we wear. Students will be introduced to such industrial and commercial applications of organic molecules. (prereq: CH 222 , CH 223 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and name types of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons
    • Classify organic compounds by their functional groups and understand their reactivities
    • Understand in-depth important reaction mechanisms
    • Relate these reactions mechanisms with metabolic processes of the human body
    • Understand medical and biotechnological applications of organic chemistry
    • Be exposed to the industrial applications of organic molecules
    • Make scientific presentation on a topic related to organic chemistry and its commercial applications
    • Identify and classify organic polymers

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Review of basic organic chemistry: IUPAC nomenclature of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and arenes (1 class)
    • Review of functional groups: oxygen containing functional groups (alcohol, ether, aldehyde, ketone and carboxylic acid), carboxylic derivatives (ester, thioester, amide), Nitrogen containing organic compounds (amines, nitrocompounds) (2 classes)
    • Reactions of alkyl halides: nucleophilic substitation, SN 1 and SN 2 reactions, E1, and E2 reactions (3 classes)
    • Arenes: electrophilic substitution, nitration, sulfonation, halogenation, Friedel-crafts alkylation and acylation (4 classes)
    • Aldehydes, ketones and sugars: reactions of aldehydes and ketones, acetals, imines in biological chemistry, stereoselective addition of carbonyls groups, oxidation of aldehydes, aldol condensation, nucleophilc addition to carbonyl group, reactions of carbohydrates (6 classes)
    • Carboxylic acids: physical properties, dicarboxylic acids, reactions of carboxylic acids, acid-catalyzed estrification, lactones, decarboxylation (5 classes)
    • Amides & Amines: basicity of amines, reactions of amines, alkylation, Hofmann elimination, electrophilic substitution, nitrosation, amino acids, peptide (amide) bonds (5 classes)
    • Introduction to polymer chemistry
    • Special Topics: biomedical, biotechological and Industrial applications of organic chemistry (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 323 - Organic Chemistry II Lab

    0 lecture hours 4 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This elective has been designed together with CH 222 , CH 223  and CH 322  to meet the organic chemistry laboratory requirement for admission to medical school. (prereq: CH 322 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Fractional distillation of alcohols
    • Nuceophilic substitution (SN1 vs SN2) reaction mechanisms
    • Properties of alcohols
    • Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)
    • Dienes (Diels-Alder reaction)
    • Electrophilic aromatic substitution
    • Synthesis of methyl benzoate (ester)
    • Depolymerization of PET plastics
    • Synthesis of sulfanilamide(antibiotic)
    • Quantitation and characterization of terethalic acid

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Fractional distillation of alcohols
    • Properties of alcohols
    • Nuceophilic substitution (Sn1 vs Sn2) reaction mechanisms
    • Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)
    • Dienes (Diels-Alder reaction)
    • Electrophilic aromatic substitution
    • Synthesis of methyl benzoate (ester)
    • Depolymerization of PET plastics
    • Synthesis of sulfanilamide (antibiotic)
    • Quantitation and characterization of terethalic acid

    Laboratory Topics
    • Experiment 1: Fractional distillation
    • Experiment 2: Properties of alcohols
    • Experiment 3: Nuceophilic substitution (Sn1 vs Sn2)
    • Experiment 4: Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)
    • Experiment 5: Dienes (Diels-Alder reaction)
    • Experiment 6: Electrophilic aromatic substitution
    • Experiment 7: Synthesis of methyl benzoate (ester)
    • Experiment 8: Depolymerization of PET plastics
    • Experiment 9: Synthesis of sulfanilamide (antibiotic)
    • Experiment 10: Quantitation and characterization of Terethalic acid

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 353 - Fundamentals of Environmental Chem

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, the basic chemistry principles discussed in Chemistry I (CH 200 ) are applied to provide an understanding of the environment, and to explain what effect certain actions have on it. Natural processes in the atmosphere, waterways, and solid waste system are explained, disruptions to the natural systems are chronicled, and then solutions to these disruptions are suggested. Toxicology of heavy metals and pesticides is explained. Important issues like climate change are discussed. Modern methods of bioremediation are introduced. Since there are no cut and dried answers to environmental problems, nor are these problems static in their identity or scope, a process of scientific thinking will be stressed throughout the course. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A  or CH 200B  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand basic chemistry of the atmosphere
    • Understand the ozone layer
    • Understand air pollution
    • Understand climate change
    • Understand toxic chemicals
    • Understand water pollution and treatment
    • Understand basics of solid waste
    • Understand bioremediation methods

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Ozone layer
    • Air pollution
    • Greenhouse effect and global warming
    • Water pollution and treatment
    • Organic toxins
    • Toxic heavy metals
    • Municipal waste and contamination of soils
    • Modern methods of bioremediation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne Alexander
  
  • CH 371 - Modern Biotechnology

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Biotechnology is introduced. The techniques used in biotechnology have brought changes to every possible aspect of our lives including careers, economy and all natural and social sciences. This elective course is designed for all interested students. The subject matter of this course changes every time it is offered in order to keep pace with a fast-growing field. Lectures are focused on important and timely topics, as well as the theory of most critical techniques that are the backbone of areas like bioengineering, biomolecular engineering, protein engineering and the biotech industry. Students have hands-on learning of the techniques during lab sessions. The course also covers the history, ethics and societal impact of biotechnology. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A  or CH 200B )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss the history, impacts, implications and ethics of biotechnology
    • Identify several principles of biotechnology
    • Be involved in a discussion about the pros and cons of the different aspects of the field
    • Use the proper terminology for several experimental techniques
    • Present a half hour talk on one topic related to biotechnology
    • Practice and teach at least three different techniques of biotechnology independently

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Structure and function of DNA and RN
    • Transcription
    • Translation
    • Genetic code
    • Gene expression

    Course Topics
    • We know who you are: genes and their expression
    • Is someone like you at home? Cloning animals and/or humans
    • Trail of the Crime: DNA and forensics
    • Can we live forever? Proteins and their functions
    • More deadly than atomic bomb? Viruses and bio-war
    • Can we see the biomolecules? Biomolecular modeling
    • Molecules within molecules! Transformation
    • Molecular scissors! Endonucleases

    Laboratory Topics
    • Difference of macro techniques from micro techniques
    • DNA separating gels
    • Understanding two strands of DNA and plasmids
    • Isolation of DNA by spooling
    • Transformation
    • Gel electrophoresis
    • Cutting DNA Lambda with restriction enzymes
    • Biomolecular modeling
    • Quantification of DNA with gel electrophoresis
    • Quantification of DNA by spectrophotometry

    Coordinator
    Dr. Gul Afshan
  
  • CH 373 - Advanced Biotechnology

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Advance techniques of biotechnology are introduced. The core of this elective course covers concepts, procedures and techniques used in the areas of advanced biotechnology. Lab activities provide hands-on practice on concepts taught in lecture. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A  or CH 200B )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and perform several advance level biotechnology techniques
    • Understand the intellectual manipulations to work through the techniques
    • Understand theoretical concept of the cell culture
    • Use the proper terminology for several cell culture techniques
    • Independently perform few basic sterile techniques of the bacterial culture
    • Present a talk and lead a discussion session on the new ideas in the field

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells

    Course Topics
    • Cell growth and sterile techniques
    • Bacterial culture
    • Technology: advantages and applications
    • Propagation and maintenance of a mammalian (eukaryotic) cell line
    • Extraction and purification of mRNA from eukaryotic cells
    • Transfection of mammalian cell lines
    • Detection of mycoplasma in the mammalian cells
    • Expression of a commercially available green fluorescent protein

    Laboratory Topics
    • Sterile techniques
    • Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)
    • Blue staining of proteins
    • Western blotting and immuno-detection
    • Oligonucleotide design by computer
    • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
    • Quantitation of proteins
    • Internet Gene Bank search

    Coordinator
    Dr. Gul Afshan
  
  • CH 401 - Topics in Chemistry

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers current topics in chemistry that are not covered in other classes. Topics and structure, as well as credits, may vary. Faculty areas of expertise and possible topics for this course are listed on the Physics and Chemistry Department pages in the undergraduate catalog and on the Web. Groups of students interested in a particular topic should contact the appropriate faculty member well in advance of registration for the quarter. Credit in this course will be determined after consultation with the instructor. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Vary by course offering

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Depend on the course offering

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students are given the opportunity to pursue an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled course work. This may take the form of individual or small group studies, literature surveys, and laboratory or research projects. Weekly meetings with the course adviser are required. A final report to be filed in the Physics and Chemistry Department may also be required. This course is offered to students with junior or senior standing. Students with freshman or sophomore standing should request CH 199 . (prereq: consent of the course coordinator and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Broaden his/her scientific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • To be determined

    Laboratory Topics
    • Depends on topic selected

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 2050 - General Chemistry for Life Sciences

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The course introduces the fundamental concepts of chemistry. Students will learn about measurement units, elements, atoms, periodic table, and the quantitative aspects of chemistry. They will study the nature of compounds, apply gas laws to human body; learn the basis of radiochemistry and its application in nuclear medicine. Learn acid base chemistry and study of colligative properties such as osmosis. Radioactivity and its medical applications conclude the general chemistry sequence (not open to engineering majors) (prereq: high school chemistry)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Conduct experiments, make observations, collect, analyze, and interpret data
    • Recognize the use of common measurement units, convert measurements done in metric system into other related units, calculate medication dosing
    • Describe the structure of atom, use the mole concept and molecular formulas
    • Locate the elements in the periodic table; recognize property trends, electron configuration
    • Draw Lewis dot structures, describe bonds, name compounds, and write formulas
    • Classify different kinds of chemical reactions, perform reaction stoichiometry
    • Identify states of matter, perform calculations based on gas laws, apply gas laws to life science situations, perform enthalpy calculations
    • Predict the solubility of substances on the basis of molecular polarity and intermolecular forces, calculate solution concentrations, Henry’s law, describe colligative properties
    • Define what are acids, bases, salts and buffers, calculate pH, blood as buffer, and learn pathologies of acidosis or alkalosis
    • Describe forms of radiation, use nuclear reaction equations and half-life, recognize health effects of radiation, use biological units red, gray and rem, describe medical uses

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Measurement units, interconversion of units, medication dosing: dose per kilogram body weight, drip rate of liquids, drops per minute dosing
    • Atoms and molecules: Structure of atom, isotopes, mole concept, chemical formulas
    • Periodic table: electronic configuration and property trends
    • Bonding: ionic and covalent bonding, electronegativity, polar covalent bonds
    • Chemical reactions: types of chemical reactions, decomposition, combination, replacement, ionic. Exothermic and endothermic reactions, stoichiometry
    • States of matter: liquid, solid, gas, kinetic molecular theory, gas laws, evaporation, sublimation, boiling and melting points, enthalpy
    • Solutions and colloids: solution and solubility, intermolecular forces, concentration expressions-nsmolarity, percent solution, milli-equivalent solution, solution preparation and stoichiometry, Henry’s law, colligative properties, colloids, dialysis
    • Acid and base properties of solutions, Bronsted theory, pH, strong acids, bases, salts, buffers, metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, respiratory acidosis and alkalosis
    • Radioactive nuclei, radioisotopes, nuclear reactions, half-life, effects of radiation on health, radiation units including biological units rad, gray, rem, medical imaging, medical use of radioisotopes

    Laboratory Topics
    • Moles and chemical formulas
    • Chemical reactions and equations
    • Gas laws (PV and VT relationships)
    • Ionic solutions and electrolytes (IV fluids, Ringer’s, Pedialyte etc.)
    • Osmosis, dialysis
    • Hemodialysis, filtration
    • Molecular geometry and bonding
    • pH part I: Measuring pH and properties of Buffers
    • Design an experiment: creation of IV fluids for specific diseases
    • Shielding from nuclear radiation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 2251 - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The course concisely focuses on what students need to know in organic chemistry in order to continue with biochemistry in the next quarter. Basic nomenclature rules will be introduced. Important functional groups involved in biological molecules will be studied. This includes alcohols, amines, amides, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives. The structures and chemistries of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids will be introduced. This will help you develop the foundation for biochemistry and will also help you understand the structure of pharmaceutical drugs. (prereq: CH 2050 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Name and draw structural formulas of organic compounds, describe bonding and isomerism, identify functional groups, conformations, properties of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes
    • Describe aromatic compounds and benzene structure, properties, and uses
    • Classify alcohols, phenols, thiols and ethers, identify alcohol groups biological molecules, describe hydrogen bonding, chemical properties of alcohols
    • Describe physical and chemical properties of aldehydes and ketones, industrial and biologically important aldehydes and ketones
    • Describe physical and chemical properties of carboxylic acids and esters
    • Classify amines and assign names, recognize key reactions, names amines as neurotransmitters, give uses of specific biological amines like epinephrine, amphetamines and alkaloids
    • Name amides, show hydrogen bonding, give products of acid and base hydrolysis, make connection with biological amides in peptides and proteins
    • Learn classes of amino acids
    • Learn chemical structure of proteins
    • Learn chemical structure of nucleic acids
    • Learn chemical structure of carbohydrates
    • Learn chemical structure of lipids

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Classes of chemical bonds
    • Organic and inorganic compounds
    • Electronegativity and bond polarity
    • Shapes of molecules
    • Intermolecular forces
    • Chemical equation stoichiometry
    • Solutes and solvents-polar and non-polar
    • Solubility of substances in polar and non-polar solvents

    Course Topics
    • Organic and inorganic compounds comparison, nomenclature of alkanes, alkenes and alkynes, isomerism, conformations, physical and chemical properties, polymers of alkenes (5 classes)
    • Aromatic compounds, benzene derivatives, properties and uses (1 class)
    • Naming and classifying alcohols, physical properties, reactions of alcohols. phenols, ether, thiol their biochemical importance, ether anesthetics (2 classes)
    • Naming aldehydes and ketones, physical properties, chemical properties: oxidation, hydrogenation, hemi-acetal. important aldehydes and ketones, chiral molecules, Fischer projections (3 classes)
    • Naming carboxylic acids and esters, physical properties, reactions of carboxylic acids and esters, alpha hydroxacids (3 classes)
    • Name amine and amides, physical and chemical properties, biological important amines (3 classes)
    • Classes of amino acids based on its chemistry-polar, non-polar, charged, reactions of amino acids (2 classes)
    • Structural levels of proteins-primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary (2 classes)
    • Structure of nucleic acid bases, nucleotides, phosphodiester bond, DNA and RNA (2 classes)
    • Structural classes of carbohydrates-mono, di-, polysaccharides, glycoside bond (2 classes)
    • Classes of lipids-nonpolar triacylglycerol, polar phospholipids (2 classes)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Organic techniques I
    • Organic techniques II
    • Reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons
    • Alcohols & phenols
    • Aldehydes and ketones
    • Carboxylic acids and ester
    • Aspirin synthesis & testing aspirin products
    • Amino acid structure
    • Carbohydrate structure

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 2261 - Biochemistry for Life Sciences

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to biomolecules, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in relation to human physiology. Structure and function of biomolecules and their roles in human body will be discussed. Enzymes and their roles in metabolism will be discussed. Nutritional aspects of the carbohydrate metabolism will be detailed. Biochemical basis of metabolic diseases will be discussed. Mechanism of action of pharmaceuticals such as dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin and PGE2 will be introduced. Hands-on experience of disease diagnosis applying biochemical approach will allow students to connect the course with their major. (prereq: CH 2251 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Learn functions of amino acids, peptides, relate the primary, secondary, tertiary, quaternary structures of proteins to function, protein hydrolysis and denaturation
    • Relate the chemical structures of carbohydrates to respective functions
    • Relate the different kinds of lipids to their respective physiological functions
    • Describe enzymes and how they work, factors affecting enzyme activity, explain enzyme inhibition, describe regulation of enzymes, recognize importance of enzymes in diseases
    • Identify nucleotides, describe structure of DNA, outline replication process, describe transcription and translation, explain how genetic code functions, describe mutations
    • Describe nutritional requirements, vitamins and minerals, outline stages of metabolism, role of ATP, coenzymes, describe metabolism of glucose in details, hormonal control of metabolism
    • Outline fat metabolism, describe conditions of ketonemia, ketonuria, ketosis, ketoacidosis
    • Learn the biochemical basis of diseases, biochemical markers and treatment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Isomerism
    • Naming organic compounds
    • Identify various organic functional groups
    • Chemical structure and classes of amino acids
    • Chemical structure of nucleic acids
    • Chemical structure and classes of carbohydrates
    • Chemical structure of lipids

    Course Topics
    • Enzyme nomenclature, enzyme co-factors, mechanism of enzyme action, factors affecting enzyme action, enzyme inhibition, enzyme regulation, medical applications of enzymes (3 classes)
    • Function of DNA and RNA, DNA replication, transcription, translation, genetic code, mutations (4 classes)
    • Nutritional requirements, macro and micronutrients, catabolism of food, ATP, coenzymes, blood glucose, glycolysis, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism, hormonal regulation (5 classes)
    • Blood lipids, beta oxidation of fatty acids, ketone bodies and pathological conditions that cause their overproduction (2 classes)
    • Biochemical explanations and diagnosis of diseases including diabetes, myocardial infarctions, hepatic and nephrotic damage (2 classes)
    • Action of pharmaceuticals such as dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin and PGE2 (1 class)
    • Exams (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Experiment #1: Vitamins         
    • Experiment #2: Enzymes         
    • Experiment #3: Peptides and Proteins   
    • Experiment #4: DNA components & Extraction
    • Experiment #5: Tests for carbohydrates            
    • Experiment #6: Lipids  
    • Experiment #7: Kidney function test-Determination of serum & urine creatinine          
    • Experiment # 8: Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase as disease marker          
    • Experiment #9: Analysis of Urine- a simulation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Vipin Paliwal
  
  • CH 3020 - Food Chemistry

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Content will include chemical groups, chemical reactions of food, chemistry of ingredients and cooking methods that drive chemical reactions. Students will explore the chemical significance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, water, vitamins, minerals and enzymes to properties of food. Students will recognize common chemical reactions and associated changes to molecular structure upon food processing. Methods to prevent detrimental chemical reactions will be discussed. Students will connect molecular structures with flavor, taste, and explore methods used to enhance flavor and taste. Students will explore the differences between solutions, colloids, and suspensions and how they are used in food preparation and taste. (prereq: CH 103 , CH 200 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or CH 2050 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe how solutions, colloids and suspensions affect food preparation and taste
    • Discuss the importance of water to properties of food
    • Compare food preparation methods to taste, appearance and nutrition
    • Recognize common food components such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, water, vitamins and minerals and their significance to food
    • Recognize common chemical reactions of food and their purpose to food preparation, nutrition and taste; describe common oxidation-reduction reactions, acid-base reactions and crystallization reactions used in food preparation
    • Discuss the chemistry of common food additives and recommend appropriate suggestion to replace common allergens
    • Compare and contrast desired microbial life benefits to the growth of harmful bacteria and fungi in food preparation
    • Describe the molecular structure of common groups of molecules in food and the significance of molecular structure to properties

    Course Topics
    • Chemical components of food; carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, water vitamins and minerals (7 class periods)
    • Chemical reaction of food and cooking (5 class periods)
    • Structure and functional relationships of common molecules (5 class periods)
    • Acids and bases (3 class periods)
    • Emulsions, solutions, suspensions, gels and foams (3 class periods)
    • Heating strategies for food preparation (4 class periods)
    • Food preservation (3 class periods)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne-Marie Nickel
  
  • CH 3650 - Materials Chemistry

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The basic chemistry principles discussed in chemistry and physics are applied to exploring the structure and properties of bulk materials. The class will focus on understanding how the structural characteristics of the atoms and molecules in a material affect the physical and chemical properties of the material. Materials will be considered on the nanoscopic level to explain macroscopic phenomena. Topics may include conductivity of materials, characterization of solids, solid solutions, nanoparticles, nanostructured devices, materials syntheses, allotropes of carbon, electrons in materials, polymetric materials and composites. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or PH 2031 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide and explain examples of properties that change depending on the scale such as nanoscale, microscale or macroscale
    • Determine a material’s chemical formula from either layer diagram or model of a crystalline structure
    • Calculate the packing efficiency for a given crystalline structure
    • Identify and describe packing, coordination geometry, coordination number for the basic types of crystalline structures
    • Describe tools and data obtained from structural determination methods
    • Explain the function, properties and applications of liquid crystalline materials
    • Identify and describe the structure and properties of several polymers
    • Compare and contrast the different types of magnetism
    • Relate the conductivity of materials to their elemental components
    • Explain with multiple examples the relationship between atomic structure and physical properties using common, commercial, and new technological materials
    • Understand and predict corrosion
    • Distinguish and categorize the major types of solids

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Types of solids
    • Crystalline materials
    • Conductivity of materials
    • Magnetism
    • Elemental composition of materials
    • Corrosion
    • Structural determination of solids
    • Bulk properties of materials at macroscale, microscale and nanoscale
    • Polymers
    • Liquid crystals

    Laboratory Topics
    • Microfluidic nanofilter (4 sessions)
    • Crystalline materials
    • Liquid crystals
    • Nanoparticle synthesis
    • Nanowire synthesis
    • Luminescent materials

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne-Marie Nickel
  
  • CH 3660 - Surface Properties of Materials

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is a materials chemistry course appropriate for junior level students from all engineering majors. The course includes basic description of physics and chemistry of surfaces and their relation to surface properties of materials. The emphasis of the course is to provide students with knowledge on several important modern applications of surface chemistry: surface chemical reactions (catalytic converters and fuel cells), thin films and their application as lubricants, coatings and novel electronic materials, improving friction and wear properties of surfaces through chemical modification. A substantial part of the course is devoted to surface nanotechnology - an introduction to the design, manufacturing and characterization of various nanomaterials and nanodevices on surfaces and their potential applications. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or PH 2030/PH 2031 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the fundamental physics and chemistry driving the phenomena that occur at the gas-solid interface
    • Use reciprocal space notation to describe surface morphology and properties
    • Understand the principles of operation of modern heterogeneous catalysts
    • Understand the principles of operation of fuel cells
    • Have a solid knowledge on how chemical modification relates to tribological properties of surfaces

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Chemical bonds and chemical bond formation
    • Physics of the solid state
    • Intermolecular forces

    Course Topics
    • Electronic structure of metal and metal-oxide surfaces
    • Surface description using reciprocal space notation
    • Modern techniques for surface characterization - AES, XPS, SPM, RAIRS, Raman
    • Physisorption and adsorption
    • Interaction of molecules with solid surfaces and surface chemical reactions
    • Heterogeneous catalysis
    • Fuel cells
    • Tribology and nanotribology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • CH 3670 - Polymer Chemistry

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course will cover the basics of polymer nomenclature, molecular weight, naturally occurring polymers, inorganic polymers, step-reaction polymerization, free radical chain polymerization, copolymerization, and testing & characterization of polymers. (prereq: CH 200  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify structures of polymers
    • Understand and identify different types of naturally occurring and inorganic polymer
    • Differentiate different types of average molecular weight and characterize and determine molecular weight of polymers
    • Understand the mechanisms of step-growth, chain-growth polymerization, and copolymerization
    • Discuss the methods for polymer testing and characterization, and interpret testing and characterization data

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Properties of matter
    • Atomic structure
    • Chemical bonding and intermolecular forces
    • Solutions, molarity

    Course Topics
    • Introductions to polymers
    • Polymer structure
    • Molecular weight of polymers
    • Naturally occurring polymers
    • Step-reaction polymerization
    • Free-radical chain polymerization
    • Copolymerization
    • Inorganic and organometallic polymers
    • Polymer characterization & testing
    • Additives
    • Polymer technology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Wujie Zhang

Construction Management

  
  • CM 250 - Construction Jobsite Management and Leadership

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course discusses construction jobsite management and leadership issues that would be encountered by entry level employees and interns. Students will be introduced to Requests for Information (RFIs), Shop Drawings, and the Submittal process. Students will also look at issues of jobsite layout and control and develop logistical plans for a construction site. Other on-site issues such as project recordkeeping and technology will also be introduced. Leadership strategies and tactics will also be discussed. (prereq: CM 2200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply basic strategies in business communication, both orally and in written form, that are common in the construction industry
    • Understand and apply basic strategies for construction recordkeeping
    • Understand and develop proper shop drawings and RFI’s for a construction project
    • Develop a jobsite layout and logistics plan
    • Understand and apply leadership strategies
    • Understand and apply principles in quality assurance and quality control on a construction project
    • Understand the ethical issues that a construction manager faces and apply ethical standards to solve problems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods

    Course Topics
    • Roles and responsibilities of the site superintendent
    • Project delivery methods
    • Shop Drawings
    • Submittals
    • Electronic recordkeeping in construction (Plan Grid software)
    • Construction meeting minutes
    • Jobsite layout and control
    • Leadership attributes
    • Motivation strategies
    • Oral communication on the jobsite

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 2121 - Surveying

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents the methods and principles of field execution and office procedures required in construction surveying, with an emphasis on typical building layout requirements.  Topics include leveling, traversing, site considerations, plumbing of the structure, and general usage of optical and digital instruments.  Required mathematical analysis is integrated. (prereq: MA 126  or high school trigonometry)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a working knowledge of surveying equipment and techniques required to do basic construction layout
    • Understand the care and handling of equipment
    • Know how to set up and operate a transit
    • Understand horizontal distances taping and EDM
    • Understand horizontal angles, reading, recording, and repetition
    • Understand horizontal curve theory and practice
    • Understand topography
    • Understand construction layout, distances and angles, and error tolerance
    • Understand the basics of U.S. federal land system, deeds, and descriptions
    • Understand differential leveling, theory and practice
    • Understand traverses, closed polygon; measuring calculations and layout
    • Understand how to set up and operate a total station
    • Understand how to set up and operate a GPS unit

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Trigonometry
    • Basic algebra

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to surveying: measuring horizontal distances; pacing, and using a cloth and steel tape
    • Leveling: setting up and operating the transit as a level, reading and calculating elevations
    • Measuring horizontal angles: setting up and operating the transit
    • Traversing: measuring, mathematically closing and setting a traverse in the field
    • Horizontal curves: computing and laying out a horizontal curve
    • Earthwork volume computations: measuring earthwork quantities by x-sectioning
    • Topographic surveying discussion
    • Boundary survey principles and construction staking techniques will be discussed in class and a complex construction layout will be performed in the field
    • Coordinate systems and construction layout techniques
    • Equipment calibration and state of the art equipment discussion and demonstrations
    • Global positioning systems

    Laboratory Topics
    • Leveling the instrument over a point
    • Taping a distance
    • Angular measurement
    • Measuring a traverse: angles
    • Differential leveling
    • Laying out a traverse (using week 4 data)
    • Horizontal curves
    • Construction layout of a building
    • Construction layout of storm sewer offset from curve
    • Inclement weather activity: traverse and curve calculations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 2200 - Building Construction Methods

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides familiarity with the crew labor and equipment activities typically applied in building construction.  Emphasis is placed on construction techniques involving the more common materials, as student in the AE 1231  Building Construction Materials course.  Laboratories highlight teamwork for the crew labor tasks applied to common assemblies and drawings of the architectural details necessary for their proper construction. (prereq: AE 1231 ) (coreq: AE 1001 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of how the CSI MasterFormat organizes information about building materials and components for site, concrete, masonry, metals and wood
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of how material properties and applications affect construction activities
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of building materials assembly to develop design details for the effective application of materials and components
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of graphical techniques used to depict information on drawings
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of common building construction means, methods, and processes
    • Demonstrate the requirements for effective team leadership, teamwork, and collective effort
    • Apply the concepts on how to think and analyze problems, not just what to think

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction materials

    Course Topics
    • Site organization
    • Safety imperatives
    • Logistical concerns
    • General building construction sequence
    • Plan reading
    • Soils and foundations
    • Equipment production formula
    • OSHA sloping criteria
    • USCS classification and properties
    • Portland cement
    • Cast-in-place and pre-cast concrete
    • Pre-tensioned and post-tensioned concrete
    • Forms and forming systems
    • Concrete reinforcement
    • Concrete placing methods
    • Concrete joints, finishing and curing
    • Masonry
    • Properties of units and motor
    • Masonry laying methods
    • Masonry bonding and jointing
    • Structural steel
    • Steel erection and fastening methods
    • Wood framing
    • Wood erection and fastening methods
    • Typical construction sequence

    Coordinator
    Doug Nelson
  
  • CM 2300 - Building Construction Methods II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course discusses advanced building construction methods as a continuation of CM 2200 , Building Construction Methods I.  The primary focus of the course will be on the methods and materials of building interior finishes and are covered within the context of quality assurance and control, logistics, planning, regulatory requirements, and decision making.  Laboratories highlight teamwork and planning for tasks applied to common interior building finishes.  (prereq: CM 2200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate working knowledge of interior construction methods
    • Identify and define the various types of doors and windows in a building
    • Identify and define the various types of interior finishes in a building
    • Understand the tools and methods used to construct interior finishes in a building
    • Understand the sequence of events on how to construct a commercial building
    • Develop a generic schedule of events on interior construction sequences

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic building construction methods

    Course Topics
    • Wood products
    • Thermal insulation
    • Vapor barriers
    • Bonding agents, sealers and sealants
    • Bituminous materials
    • Roofing systems
    • Exterior doors and windows
    • Interior doors
    • Entrances and storefronts
    • Cladding systems
    • Drywall and paint
    • Interior walls, partitions and ceilings
    • Flooring systems
    • Acoustical materials
    • Finish carpentry, cabinetry
    • Interior finishes

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3013 - Construction Project Financial and Cost Control

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Provides a working knowledge of cost engineering practices and techniques applied to construction project cost management and control activities to optimize project financial returns. (prereq: BA 2501 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Without reference, the student can explain the information flow between cost control and other commonly interacting construction project disciplines
    • Without reference, the student can describe and track the steps in the transmission of typical job site labor, materials, equipment cost data, through typical project performance reports, to its effect on company financial reports
    • Given the required course materials, the student can devise and apply a suitable work breakdown structure for a building construction project of modest scope
    • Without reference except for appropriate project status reports, the student can perform an accurate earned value analysis and cite possible causes of performance variances and actionable remedies for unacceptable performance of a typical construction project
    • Without reference, the student can cite multiple special concerns and techniques for controlling various types of direct and indirect project costs
    • Without reference, the student can state and explain the significance of at least three ethical imperatives for construction cost engineers

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Construction and cost accounting practices and procedures
    • Construction cost engineering to include forecasting and revenue projections
    • Earned value analysis
    • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
    • Jobsite labor and performance reporting
    • Direct and indirect cost reporting

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3024 - Construction Law

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Architectural engineering, construction management and civil engineering students gain a working knowledge of elemental aspects of construction and general business law and legal concepts to include legally sufficient and proper routine administrative processes. Students gain understanding of construction and general business risks and ethics, to enhance their decision-making skills as construction project team members.  (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze elemental construction project or general business disputes and recommend legally sufficient and proper routine administrative processes in the context of appropriate risk management and ethical behavior
    • Explain the different types and the general provisions and structure of construction contracts, including identifying the parties and their respective roles and duties
    • Explain fundamental aspects of the regulatory environment and professional licensing
    • Explain fundamental aspects of lien law and the contractor’s rights and remedies
    • Explain fundamental provisions of national and local labor law
    • Explain general administrative procedures by which to avoid disputes and litigation
    • Identify ethical issues arising in professional practice, and apply ethical standards to determine an appropriate course of action
    • Describe common claims and defenses to liability applicable to Owners, Contractors, and Design Professionals
    • Discuss the public policy implications of important federal legislation impacting engineering and construction practice

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • American legal system
    • Business associations
    • Construction contracts
    • Role play exercises
    • Exams and exam review
    • Professional responsibilities
    • Torts
    • Land use controls
    • Payment provisions
    • Change orders
    • Subsurface and unforeseen conditions
    • Subcontracting process
    • Claims and defenses to claims
    • Risk management 
    • Construction labor law
    • Arbitration and alternative dispute resolution methods
    • Current trends

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3112 - Building Environmental and Mechanical Systems for CM

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Students will develop a working knowledge of building HVAC, sanitary, and other mechanical systems components and their functioning, to enable effective installation planning, scheduling and cost estimation by the construction manager. Students will study the basic design principles of HVAC and plumbing systems as well and completing basic load calculations. Lab activities will revolve around load calculations, basic installation methods of HVAC and plumbing systems, and estimating/scheduling activities for mechanical systems. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the principles of HVAC and plumbing to make a safe and healthy building environment
    • Effectively balance mechanical criteria in order to select an optimal mechanical system
    • Develop accurate take-offs and estimates of mechanical systems
    • Describe the pros and cons of different types of mechanical systems
    • Identify and define different components of a mechanical system
    • Develop a schedule that incorporates mechanical systems into a schedule of a General Contractor

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Reading mechanical plans
    • Heating systems
    • Cooling systems
    • Ventilation systems
    • Ductwork
    • Indoor air quality
    • HVAC take-off and estimating
    • Commissioning
    • DWV systems
    • Domestic water systems
    • Storm water systems
    • Fire protection systems

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3210 - Construction Scheduling

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Course imparts a working knowledge of construction project scheduling techniques, especially the critical path method for network analysis, to enable determination of dates and durations of project activities. Includes exercises in network logic and constraints, forward and backward passes, critical path and float, cost crashing, resource leveling, and PERT. Concept of a work breakdown structure is integrated. Study begins with manual techniques but shifts to gain skill with common scheduling software. (prereq: CM 3250 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Without reference, the student can describe at least one advantage and disadvantage for each of the following: the Gantt chart, CPM AoA, CPM AoN, CPM PDM, linear activity schedule, and PERT
    • Given the contract documents for a building construction project of moderate scope ($3 to $5 million), as well as a detailed (Level 4) copy of the CSI UniFormat and MasterFormat, the student can disaggregate the work to define an appropriate set of activities that includes pre-construction tasks
    • Given an array of appropriate construction project activities, the student can logically constrain and sequence the activities to create a coherent project network
    • Given an array of appropriate construction project activities, the student can estimate their respective durations, based on available resources and work quantity takeoffs
    • Given a logic network of construction activities, their respective durations, and the unconstrained resources to be applied against each activity, the student can perform a forward and backward pass to establish the project duration, determine the critical path(s), and schedule the early start of each activity all without additional references
    • Given a construction project early start schedule prepared with unconstrained resources, without additional references, the student can level the schedule if any resources become constrained
    • Given necessary crash-cost curves, the student can optimize the resources to be applied, in order to deliver the project at least total cost
    • Given a logic network and the activities, shortest expected, most probable, and longest expected durations, students can perform a PERT analysis with only normal probability tables and the variance formula as references
    • Given the contract documents for a building construction project of moderate scope ($3 to $5 million), as well as a task list with assigned resources, durations, and precedences, students can correctly load a standard scheduling software package to obtain an accurate activity schedule and typical reports

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Some course topics related to scheduling are briefly introduced in CM 3011, and pre-construction activities are introduced, as well. Calculation of activity durations relies on knowledge of detailed production estimating.

    Course Topics
    • Construction planning vs. scheduling
    • Types of construction schedules (Gantt, CPM, AoA, AoN, PDM, PERT)
    • Event time calculations
    • Logic types
    • Dummy activities
    • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
    • Activity duration determination
    • Time vs. cost
    • Forward and backward passes
    • Critical path and its significance
    • Float or slack
    • Resource leveling
    • AoN networks
    • PDM networks and lag
    • Scheduling pre-construction activities
    • Linear activity scheduling
    • Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT)
    • Project control issues (linked to CM 3013 )

    Laboratory Topics
    • Gantt chart preparation
    • AoA network preparation
    • Early start schedule preparation and resource summary
    • AoN network preparation
    • Scheduling software capabilities and applications

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3250 - Construction Estimating

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course teaches the methodology, procedures and organizational techniques involved in preparing a competitive bid. Detailed estimates for each major construction discipline are prepared, based upon real construction project documents. Ethical considerations in budgeting and estimating are discussed. The final project is the preparation of a formal competitive bid on a project (ABET Design Course). (prereq: CM 2200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know the various types of estimating required
    • Know the bidding process
    • Know how to prepare a quantity survey
    • Know how to interpret drawings and specifications
    • Know the various costs of work
    • Know how to qualify subcontractor quotes
    • Know how to develop bidding strategies
    • Know the ethical implications of the budgeting, bidding, estimating process
    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods

    Course Topics
    • Construction estimating
    • Planning and administration
    • The quantity survey
    • Cost of work
    • Finalizing, recapping and submitting the bid
    • Post bid follow-up and using the construction estimate
    • Labor management
    • Bid rigging and bid shopping
    • Contractor management
    • Quality assurance
    • Safety
    • Project closeout
    • Ethical issues to consider in the bidding, budgeting, estimating process
    Laboratory Topics
    • Types of estimates
    • Estimating procedures
    • Quantity takeoffs
    • On Screen take-off Software
    • Accuracy in estimating
    • Checks and balances
    • Competitive bid
    • CostWorks estimating software
    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3417 - Construction Equipment Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a working knowledge of powered equipment types and other jobsite systems commonly applied in methods of building construction. Internal rental rate compilation, buy-lease-rent and repair-replace decisions, maintenance management, detailed determination of costs and schedule relating to building foundation construction and to crane lifting operations are some of the topics introduced. Equipment operations for horizontal construction are only briefly included. (prereq: CM 2200 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a working knowledge of common building construction equipment types and operations
    • Develop a working knowledge of project- and enterprise-level equipment management concerns
    • Develop a working knowledge of internal rental rate and production unit-cost calculations
    • Develop a working knowledge of equipment maintenance management imperatives and techniques
    • Develop a working knowledge of equipment cost estimating and scheduling techniques
    • Develop a working knowledge of equipment selection based on the type and amount of work to be accomplished

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Time-value of money
    • Common construction methods
    • Soil properties

    Course Topics
    • Internal rental rate
    • Buy-lease-rent and repair-replace decisions
    • Maintenance management
    • Equipment application sequences for common excavation and lifting requirements

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 3612 - Building Electrical and Communication Systems for CM

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Students will develop a working knowledge of building electrical and communication systems components and their functioning, to enable effective installation planning, scheduling and cost estimation by the construction manager. Students will study the basic design principles of power and lighting systems as well and completing basic load calculations. Lab activities will revolve around load calculations, basic installation methods of power and lighting systems, and estimating/scheduling activities for electrical systems (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic principles of electrical power systems in buildings
    • Understand the basic principles of lighting systems in buildings
    • Develop basic calculations for power loads in a building
    • Identify and define the different components of an electrical system
    • Develop take-offs and estimates for electrical systems in buildings
    • Develop a schedule that incorporates electrical systems into a schedule for a general contractor

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Physics of electricity and magnetism
    • Basic power loads and calculations
    • Basic lighting loads and calculations
    • Electrical quantities
    • Voltage systems
    • Electrical distribution and grounding systems
    • Specifications, shop drawings and submittals for electrical
    • Low voltage systems
    • Lighting sources and fixtures
    • Basic estimating for electrical systems
    • Code issues for electrical
    • Ethics for subcontractors
    • Sustainability for electrical

    Laboratory Topics
    • Physics of electricity
    • Physics of magnetism
    • Power load calculations
    • Lighting load calculations
    • Basic wiring lab
    • Tour of generic facility
    • Power systems take-off and estimating
    • Lighting systems take-off and estimating
    • Shop drawings and submittals
    • Tour of MSOE Kern Center

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4311 - Construction Project Management I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Course emphasizes construction phase activities, building on learning of previous courses and preparing CM students for requirements during later assignments of senior project. Construction project management software is introduced. (prereq: CM 2200 , junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop working knowledge of electronic project administration, to include project management software applications
    • Develop working knowledge of modifying a standard design-build contract to better meet the needs of the project
    • Develop a working knowledge of how best to respond to a request for proposal (RFP) or a request for qualifications (RFQ)
    • Develop working knowledge of preparing a project information management plan for a client
    • Develop a working knowledge of documentation typically required to administer construction phase operations, to include preparation of clear, concise, and complete records, reports, correspondence, and submittals
    • Develop a working knowledge of suitable scheduling, attendees, and content for meetings typically needed to properly administer construction phase operations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Elements of the total construction project cycle and processes
    • Risk management, project delivery methods, and contracts
    • Roles and responsibilities of typical project team members
    • Value engineering and constructability in the design process
    • Project planning process, scheduling, and the role of estimating
    • Information management and documentation principles
    • Construction project record keeping and controls
    • Quality in the constructed project
    • Safety management
    • Partnering, contract enforcement and dispute resolution
    • Project closeout

    Course Topics
    • Electronic project administration
    • Meetings and negotiations
    • Project reports and records
    • Preconstruction operations
    • Construction operations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Prepare a written response to RFQ
    • Prepare a written response to RFP
    • Supplement a standard design-build contract for a set of notional project circumstances and requirements
    • Electronic project administration
    • Meeting organization and execution
    • Start a Project Management Plan

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4321 - Construction Project Management II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Course further develops skills and knowledge necessary for effective management of construction phase activities. Exercises require application of software to reinforce integration of detailed estimating, bidding, and scheduling skills. Ethical imperatives are discussed. (prereq: CM 4311 , CM 3013 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a working knowledge of applying construction project planning principles to a particular site and specific contract documents
    • Develop a working knowledge of possible ethical dilemmas that can erupt during construction operations and how they should be solved
    • Reinforce knowledge of detailed estimating, bidding, and scheduling, as will be required for CM 4731  CM Senior Project III
    • Develop a working knowledge of construction contract modification administration and control

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electronic project administration
    • Meetings and negotiations
    • Project reports and records
    • Preconstruction operations
    • Construction operations

    Course Topics
    • Planning for construction
    • Detailed construction estimating procedures
    • Construction scheduling procedures
    • Changes and extra work
    • Ethical dilemmas in construction

    Laboratory Topics
    • Development and application of a suitable detailed work breakdown structure (WBS), using the CSI UniFormat and MasterFormat
    • Detailed construction estimating procedures
    • Construction scheduling procedures

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4512 - Construction Safety Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a working knowledge of OSHA standard as they relate to the construction Industry. Safety requirements, public protection, insurance issues and contract language responsibilities are some of the topics introduced. Students who attend all of the classes and pass the final exam have the opportunity to earn an OSHA 30-hour certification. (prereq: CM 2200 , junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a working knowledge of OSHA standards pertaining to common building construction operations
    • Develop a working knowledge of project- and enterprise-level safety management concerns
    • Develop a working knowledge of how safety costs affect the construction estimate
    • Develop a working knowledge of safety responsibilities on the site as they are spelled out in the contracts
    • Earn certification and acquire an OSHA 30-hour training card

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • The OSHA Act and how it pertains to construction
    • Personal protective equipment
    • Hazard communication
    • Excavation safety
    • Fall protection
    • Scaffold and ladder safety
    • Material and tool safety
    • Setting up a safety program
    • Safety, insurance and the contract

    Coordinator
    Daniel Burazin
  
  • CM 4712 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project I

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the first part of a three-part series in designing a building for a real-life client using the design build project delivery method. The course concentrates on preparing and developing the required “program” a designer must complete in order to understand the client’s building and design goals and requirements. The students must understand spatial relationships, building users, building codes and budget constraints in the development of the final program. The program is then used in the other senior project courses, AE 4721 /CM 4721  and AE 4731 /CM 4731 , as a basis of the design for the building. Other topics include team organization, team building, client interviewing skills, LEED and sustainable development, space analysis, building code review, building type research, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and CAD. Note: BSAE students should register for AE 4712  in their fourth year and CM-4712 in their fifth year. BSCM students should register for CM 4712; five-year two-degree BSAE/BSCM students should register for AE 4712  in their fourth year and CM 4712 in their fifth year. Students must take this course in consecutive terms with AE 4721 /CM 4721 , followed by AE 4731 /CM 4731 . (prereq: CM 3210 , and CM 325 or CM 3250 , major GPA greater than 2.0, senior standing or fifth year standing in BSAE/BSCM five-year program) (coreq: AE 4311 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Formulate the space requirements of a building based on client interviews and research
    • Generate appropriate plans based on the required spatial relationships
    • Identify appropriate LEED and sustainable design features
    • Determine appropriate Building Code regulations that apply to their project
    • Analyze budget constraints
    • Research appropriate building type examples for their project
    • Facilitate team organization and team building

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Speech
    • Sketching ability
    • Architectural graphic skills
    • Understanding of all building systems
    • Building type and associated construction costs

    Course Topics
    • Team building
    • Design Build Delivery System
    • Programming
    • Space analysis
    • Research and data collection
    • Commissioning
    • Value engineering
    • Interviewing
    • Building Code review
    • Conceptual estimating

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4721 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project II

    1 lecture hours 3 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of the three-part senior project series. This is a team-taught course, taught by architects, structural engineers, HVAC engineers, plumbing and fire protection engineers, building electrical power distribution engineers, and construction managers. It continues to emphasize the design-build process and requires an interdisciplinary team of students to utilize their respective engineering design specialty courses or construction management expertise as they design a building and plan for its construction by using estimating, scheduling, budgeting and construction project management techniques. The following phases will be completed: (1) site analysis; (2) preliminary architectural drawings and presentations; (3) architectural design development drawings; (4) preliminary engineering (structural, environmental, electrical) systems analysis; (5) preliminary budget analysis; (6) project scheduling and (7) ongoing project management responsibilities; (8) presentation to clients and other professionals. Note: Four-year BSAE students must register for AE 4721 ; four-year BSCM students must register for CM 4721; five-year BASE/BSCM two-degree students must register for AE 4721  in their fourth year and for CM 4721 in their fifth year. The three-course sequence 4711/4721/4731 must be taken in consecutive quarters during the same academic year. (prereq: senior standing, CM 4712 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how to develop a conceptual estimate from the client program
    • Understand the element of a preconstruction schedule
    • Understand how to assemble a project pro forma
    • Understand how to develop a Management Information Systems (MIS) plan
    • Understand the key steps in the value engineering and constructability analysis of the project design

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Estimating
    • Scheduling
    • MIS
    • Value engineering
    • Constructability
    • Pro forma and project financing feasibility
    • Presentations
    • Model building

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4731 - Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Design-Build Senior Project III

    1 lecture hours 3 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is the final course in the senior project series, a continuation of the team-taught senior project. Emphasis is on the design-build process and the interdisciplinary team of students to utilize their respective engineering design specialty courses or construction management expertise. This course emphasizes the engineering design and construction project management work begun in AE 4721 /CM 4721 . The topics in this course include (1) analysis and calculations for all engineering systems; (2) continued constructability analysis and value engineering; (3) life cycle cost analysis; (4) construction quality control systems; (5) project scheduling, estimating; (6) ongoing project management; and (7) project startup procedures. Students also make a presentation to industrialists in defense of their engineering design or CM project analysis. Four-year BSAE students must register for AE 4731; four-year BSCM students must register for CM 4731; five-year BSAE/BSCM two-degree students must register for AE 4731 in year four and for CM 4731 in year five of their programs. The three-course sequence, 4711/4721/4731, must be taken in consecutive quarters during the same academic year. (prereq: senior standing, CM 4721 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Design and develop a detailed estimate from the project drawings
    • Design and develop a detailed project schedule
    • Design and develop a site-specific safety process
    • Design and develop a quality assurance/quality control process
    • Understand the key steps in the value engineering and constructability analysis of the project design
    • Present the project plan in both written and oral form to a jury of outside industry professionals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Estimating 
    • Scheduling
    • Site logistics plans
    • General conditions
    • Quality assurance
    • Quality control
    • Manpower loading and analysis
    • BIM clash detection

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 4980 - Special Topics in Construction Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers topics in Construction Management that are not covered in other classes. Topics and structure may vary depending on the mutual interest of faculty and students. (prereq: Depends on topics chosen)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies depending on topics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies depending on topics

    Course Topics
    • Varies depending on topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 5020 - Project Acquisitions and Business Development

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students gain a working knowledge of project acquisition of new work in the construction industry. The student is exposed to an overview of organizational theory, strategic planning and business planning in the construction industry as well as acquisition procedures including response techniques for complex requests for proposals and understanding the final concepts of sales and marketing, backlog, and business development budgeting in construction. (prereq: graduate standing, open to undergraduate students with permission of course program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and identify the project acquisition process
    • Identify projects for acquisition using a go-no-go matrix
    • Develop a prequalification submittal
    • Identify their company’s competitive advantage
    • Generate a planning process for estimating
    • Produce proposals using current marketing strategies
    • Identify risk in evaluating construction contracts
    • Present their project proposals in both written and oral form
    • Develop a handoff meeting agenda and understand how the handoff meeting functions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods
    • Construction project management
    • Construction estimating

    Course Topics
    • Project acquisition process
    • Requests for proposal
    • Prequalification packets
    • Determining your competitive advantage
    • Identifying clients and their decision-making process
    • Legal issues in acquisition
    • Written proposal strategies
    • Bidding strategies
    • Handoff meetings
    • Documentation and tracking strategies
    • Presentation techniques

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 5040 - Construction Operations and Management Strategies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Theory and case studies related to the executive-focused management of construction business operations; investigation of current business practices employed by construction firms, executive-level decision-making processes, case studies. (prereq: graduate standing, open to undergraduate students with permission of course program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand basic strategies for starting a construction company
    • Effectively manage and control the marketing aspect of a construction company
    • Manage, control, and utilize the financial aspects and controls of a construction company
    • Understand and manage the operations component of a construction company
    • Manage all risks associated with running a construction company, including safety issues
    • Understand the human resources component of a construction company

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods
    • Construction project management

    Course Topics
    • The business of contracting
    • Construction company process analysis and improvement
    • Starting a new company
    • The acquire work process
    • The build work process
    • Controlling the marketing process
    • Controlling the operations aspect of the business
    • Differing methods in securing work in good and bad economies
    • The keep track process
    • Managing the financials of a construction firm
    • Job cost guidelines for a construction firm
    • Managing people in construction
    • Best practices in management
    • Human resources in construction
    • Desired attributes of a construction company’s personnel
    • Future directions of the construction industry

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 5045 - Lean Construction and Resource Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Lean construction applications, advanced construction materials and processes from conception to completion; alternative construction delivery processes; codes, municipal approval processes and standards; various contemporary/innovative building systems; managing complex projects; means and methods variations; identification and analysis of the factors affecting resources of the construction industry on a local, national or international level; materials, products and equipment procurement utilizing supply chain management; procurement cycle using Internet-based applications. (prereq: graduate standing, open to undergraduate students with permission of the course program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the key elements of construction management as it relates to lean production and lean construction practices
    • Critically evaluate alternative approaches to resource and knowledge management in construction management
    • Critically evaluate alternative approaches to project delivery in construction management

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods
    • Construction project management

    Course Topics
    • Lean construction
    • Lean construction’s connection to IPD
    • Lean construction’s connection to BIM
    • Construction knowledge management 
    • Modern construction practices
    • Waste management
    • Recycling in construction

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 5520 - 21st Century Leadership in Construction

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will introduce the student to various styles and theories of leading others to accomplish a common goal.  Students will participate in self-examination to discover their natural tendencies for communication and leadership.  The course will explore theories of human motivation, communication, and problem solving.  Examples and issues will revolve around the construction industry and will be relevant for Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering and Construction Management students. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe and observe various leadership trait theories
    • Understand theories of human motivation
    • Practice situational leadership
    • Gain knowledge of communication strategies and time management
    • Apply Choosing by Advantages for making decisions
    • Read and analyze corporate financial statements

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Definition of leadership and how it differs from management
    • Starting with why and understanding the power of vision casting
    • Leadership trait theories
    • Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Successful People
    • Writing a personal mission statement
    • Discovering your personal communication style and how to interact with others
    • Motivational theories of Maslow, Herzberg and Deming
    • Understanding of servant leadership
    • Communication strategies and handling crucial conversations
    • Time management techniques
    • Choosing by advantages for sound decision making
    • Presentation skill enhancement
    • Understanding financial statements

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 7005 - Sustainable Built Environment

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents how sustainable construction materials and methods contribute to meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs; identifies and analyzes those international, national and local programs promoting sustainable construction; characterizes the components of successful sustainable construction projects; analyzes design as well as construction aspects of Green Building and LEED certification; identifies project strategies to achieve LEED certification; explores industrial ecology; and reviews construction environment impact studies. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Become familiar with many worldwide as well as national green programs
    • Understand how meeting various goals and certifications in the green world contributes to the advancement of society and the wellbeing of our world
    • Understand and manage the green efforts in both the design and construction industries
    • Isolate and determine costs associated with building green projects
    • Educate others in the construction industry as to green issues

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction methods
    • Construction project management
    • Sustainable construction
    • Construction estimating

    Course Topics
    • Greening of the construction industry
    • International, national, and local green programs
    • Project strategies to achieve LEED design
    • Green management plan
    • Green product standards
    • Ongoing green building operations
    • Life Cycle costs
    • Green contract issues
    • Costs of green construction
    • Sustainability and BIM
    • Selling green services
    • Green marketing
    • Industrial ecology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan
  
  • CM 7050 - Construction Data and Information Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of information systems and data communication within the construction industry; data transmissions and network-based technologies employed in the design, implementation, and management of construction communication networks; Building Information Modeling; advanced computer and information systems applied in the construction industry; mobile and cloud systems; imaging; independent projects; research. (prereq: graduate standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the increased importance of data and information management techniques in construction management practices and the basic concepts and theories concerning the use of information technology
    • Apply the knowledge and skills to critically evaluate alternative approaches for using information technology for construction management
    • Use hands-on experience in the use of a well-known and widely used information technologies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Construction project management
    • Building information modeling

    Course Topics
    • Interoperability
    • IT for construction
    • IT for facility management
    • Building Information Modeling (BIM)
    • Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jera Sullivan

Computer Science

  
  • CS 421 - Advanced Computer Graphics

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students explore the field of interactive 3-D computer graphics. Lecture topics provide theoretical and practical knowledge of common 3-D graphics algorithms and techniques. Laboratory exercises focus on the creation of interactive 3-D applications using existing software libraries. The course culminates in a student-chosen design project implementing various aspects of 3-D graphics. (prereq: SE 2811  or CS 321X)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply 3-D graphics algorithms related to transformations, illumination, texturing, etc. with the aid of software libraries
    • Understand the issues relevant to computer animation
    • Develop interactive applications using 3-D graphics
    • Investigate and apply software libraries for 3-D graphics and related software needs

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic 2-D and 3-D graphics algorithms and concepts
    • Object-oriented language programming

    Course Topics
    • Tests and reviews
    • OpenGL, programmable pipeline, vertex and fragment shaders
    • Transformations
    • Illumination
    • Optimization
    • Animation
    • Texture
    • Shading
    • Ray tracing
    • Curves
    • Fractals

    Laboratory Topics
    • Software library introduction
    • Interactive presentation graphics
    • Illumination
    • Animation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • CS 1011 - Software Development I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to object-oriented software development using the Java programming language. Emphasis is placed on translating written problem descriptions into robust software solutions. Topics covered include Java program structure, algorithmic problem solving and modularization, I/O statements, control constructs, looping techniques, class libraries, user-defined classes and methods, arrays, and ArrayLists. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Design and document an algorithmic solution for a given problem statement
    • Create and interpret complex expressions that use relational and Boolean operators
    • Select the appropriate selection control statement for a given task
    • Use while/do-while/for statements to control repetition in algorithmic solutions
    • Select the appropriate repetition control statement for a given task
    • Translate UML class diagrams into Java code
    • Design and implement simple classes
    • Design and implement class and object methods
    • Use existing Java class libraries
    • Design and implement simple Java programs
    • Declare and use collections of primitive and object data using arrays
    • Declare and use collections of object data using ArrayLists

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Algorithm development
    • Arithmetic operations
    • String and primitive data types
    • Java development basics
    • Selection
    • Iteration
    • Standard Java classes
    • Math library
    • UML class/sequence diagrams
    • OO programming
    • Methods and arguments
    • Class implementation
    • Arrays
    • ArrayLists
    • Review

    Laboratory Topics
    • Java development environment
    • Conditionals
    • Iteration
    • Standard Java classes
    • Class implementation
    • Arrays
    • Array lists

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 1021 - Software Development II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the study of objected-oriented software development using the Java programming language. Students design, document and implement software classes and incorporate these classes into larger applications. Topics covered include abstraction, encapsulation, declaring and implementing abstract data types, interfaces, inheritance, polymorphism, graphical user interfaces, simple event-driven programming, exception handling, and file I/O. (prereq: CS 1011  or SE1011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the rationale for object-oriented design and programming
    • Translate UML class and sequence diagrams into Java code
    • Apply composition, inheritance, and interfaces
    • Distinguish between extending a class (inheritance) and implementing an interface
    • Define polymorphism
    • Design and implement simple Java classes and packages
    • Document the implementation of small software systems
    • Make appropriate use of exception handling
    • Use classes from the Java standard library to read and write files on disk
    • Use the Java API specification (javadoc) to determine correct use of standard library classes

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Selection and iteration statements
    • Simple Java programs
    • Simple Java classes
    • UML class diagrams into Java code
    • Arrays and ArrayLists

    Course Topics
    • Java fundamentals
    • GUI
    • Event-driven programming
    • Aggregation, composition, generalization, and realization in UML class diagrams
    • Inheritance and polymorphism
    • Interfaces/Abstract classes
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O

    Laboratory Topics
    • ArrayLists
    • Inheritance
    • Interfaces
    • GUI
    • Event handling
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 2040 - Programming in C and C++

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course introduces students to additional scripted, procedural, and object-oriented programming languages including C and C++. Students are introduced to the concepts of compilation, memory management, linking, low-level types, efficient implementation of objects, and the Standard Template Library. Students may not receive credit for both CS 3210  and CS 2040. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Write procedural C programs
    • Write procedural and object-oriented C++ programs
    • Make use of C++ operator overloading
    • Make use of C++ polymorphism, particularly virtual vs. non-virtual methods
    • Create and make use of C++ namespaces
    • Create and make use of C++ templates
    • Make use of the C++ Standard Library
    • Make use of C and C++ memory management tools
    • Make use of C/C++ compiler pre-processor directives
    • Distinguish and make use of argument passing by value, reference, and address
    • Discuss how typing systems influence efficiency, readability, and reliability
    • Write procedural and object-oriented programs in a scripting language
    • Be familiar with functional programming

     


    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Object-oriented programming
    • Java
    • Data structures

    Course Topics
    • Procedural, object-oriented programming in a scripting language
    • Procedural, object-oriented C++ programming
    • Memory management in C++
    • Standard Template Library
    • Procedural programming in C
    • Functional programming concepts

    Laboratory Topics
    • Scripting languages
    • C++
    • C

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker

  
  • CS 2300 - Computational Science

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    An introduction to the science of computation and data including tools, languages, and methods to support artificial intelligence. Topics include applying the scientific method for data-driven computational problems, analysis, data preparation, and visualization.  (prereq: CS 1021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Learn and apply the scientific method to data analysis and inference
    • Clean and manage data using functional programming libraries such as pandas
    • Use matrices and software libraries to structure data for analysis and manipulation
    • Manipulate models of real-world problems based on data
    • Predict the runtime and memory utilization of algorithms based on complexity analysis methods
    • Communicate data interpretations including generating meaningful data visualizations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • CS 2400 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of artificially intelligent systems. Topics covered include knowledge representation, problem solving using search, and the agent framework.  The role of AI in engineering and computing systems is presented, and students complete exercises that develop skills in applying AI tools and languages to real-world problems.  (prereq: CS 2852 , CS 2300 , and one of MA 2310  or MA 1830)  
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand what constitutes artificial intelligence and be able to identify such systems as well as their limitations
    • Solve problems, including game play problems, through decision trees and search
    • Apply propositional and first-order logic to planning problems
    • Train neural networks for classification
    • Solve problems using reinforcement Q-learning
    • Understand machine learning concepts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understand and apply complex data structures and algorithms
    • Use appropriate algorithms (and associated data structures) to design and build working software systems
    • Understand the use of recursion in problem solving
    • Predict the runtime and memory utilization of algorithms based on complexity analysis methods
    • An ability to construct Python solutions to programming problems
    • Understand and apply mathematical functions, relations, and sets as well as the associated operations
    • Ability to form logic proofs using symbolic propositional logic
    • Understand and apply symbolic predicate logic

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to AI, Turing Test, learning
    • Decision trees, search, BFS, DFS
    • A*, heuristics
    • Game playing
    • Planning
    • Propositional and first-order logic
    • Neural networks
    • Genetic algorithms
    • Reinforcement Q-learning

    Laboratory Topics
    • Dungeon crawling
    • A*
    • Game playing
    • STRIPS planning
    • Implementations of a simple game
    • Implementation of a neural network with an application to classification
    • Group presentations on additional AI topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • CS 2550 - Concepts of Data Structures and Algorithms

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the organization of data and the algorithms that act upon them. The fundamentals of how to store, retrieve, and process data efficiently is covered. Emphasis is placed on fundamental data structures and algorithms for search, sorting, and dynamic programming. The topics of stacks, queues, trees, sets, and hash maps are introduced. Fundamentals of algorithm performance are introduced with an emphasis placed on computational time and space complexity analysis. Laboratory activities include the application of data structures and algorithms from standard libraries using scripting and high-level, object-oriented languages. (prereq: BE 2200  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Select appropriate abstract data type (ADT), data structure, and algorithm for an application
    • Use variations of standard data structures and algorithms and understand how changes affect correctness and time complexity
    • Introduction into algorithm design
    • Quickly determine how efficient an algorithm or data structure will be

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Event-driven programming in a high-level language
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O
    • Arrays
    • Interfaces/abstract classes

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to data structures and algorithms
    • The role of algorithms in the problem-solving process
    • Divide and conquer problem-solving strategies
    • Abstract data types (ADT) including interfaces and inheritance
    • Java collections framework and Array based lists
    • Computational time complexity
    • Computational space complexity
    • Introduction to sorting algorithms, insertion sort, bubble sort
    • Quick sort
    • Queues
    • Stacks
    • Linked lists
    • Hash tables
    • Recursion
    • Trees, tree traversal, tree implementation strategies
    • Breadth-first search (BSF)
    • Introduction to graphs
    • Graph algorithms and implementation strategies
    • Strategies for choosing and implementing the right data structure, algorithm
    • Comparison and analysis of existing resources

    Laboratory Topics
    • Problem solving with algorithms
    • Java Collections for reading, sorting, and displaying data
    • Algorithmic analysis and benchmarking - mystery sort
    • Design and analysis of ADTs, data structures, and algorithms for sorting applications
    • Linked lists, stacks, queues, and hash tables comparison and analysis
    • Tree traversal and search application
    • Graph-based representation and search of biological data

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 2711 - Computer Organization

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students with an introduction to the structure of computer hardware, including the components of a modern computer system as well as the tradeoffs necessary to construct such a system. Specific course topics include Boolean Algebra, basic combinatorial logic, basic sequential logic, numeric systems, the role of performance in designing computer systems, Amdahl’s Law, instruction formats, addressing modes, computer arithmetic with both fixed and floating point numbers, single cycle and multi-cycle data-path design, pipelining, the memory hierarchy, and caching. Students will develop small, assembly language programs on a simulator as a means of exploring instruction formats and data-path operation. (prereq: CS 1011  or SE 1011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use Boolean algebra to simplify logic statements
    • Construct simple combinatorial and sequential logic designs to solve basic problems
    • Understand the relationship between input, output, memory, the processor, the data path, and the control path within a computer
    • Explain how signed and unsigned numbers and floating point numbers are represented within a computer
    • Perform signed, unsigned, and floating point mathematical operations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
    • Explain the memory hierarchy within a computer and quantify its impact on computer performance
    • Explain how variables are allocated in memory and the relationship between variables and pointers
    • Compute performance related metrics for a computer-based system or implemented program
    • Critique the design and implementation of a processor based upon design parameters
    • Write simple assembly language routines using MIPS assembly language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Simple procedural programming
    • Primitive data types and sizes
    • Fundamental understanding of arrays

    Course Topics
    • Truth tables
    • Boolean algebra
    • Circuit design
    • Karnaugh maps
    • Computer parts
    • Electrical power
    • Computing performance
    • Computer operations
    • Signed and unsigned numbers
    • Representing programs in memory
    • Logical operations
    • Procedures and functions
    • Communicating with users
    • Exam review
    • Midterm exam
    • Adders and subtractors
    • Comparators
    • Addition and subtraction
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Floating point numbers
    • Latches, flip-flops, and registers
    • The processor
    • Datapath design
    • Pipelining
    • Branch prediction
    • Memory technology
    • Caching
    • Caching performance
    • Multicore introduction / emerging topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • CS 2852 - Data Structures

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the organization of data and the algorithms that act upon them. The topics of arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, sets, and hash tables are introduced. Fundamentals of algorithm performance are also introduced, with an emphasis placed on time complexity analysis. Laboratory activities include implementation of data structures as well as the application of data structures from standard libraries. (prereq: CS 1021  or SE 1021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply complex data structures and algorithms
    • Use appropriate algorithms (and associated data structures) to solve problems
    • Have a thorough understanding of commonly used library data structures
    • Analyze the time complexity of algorithms
    • Understand the use of recursion in problem solving
    • Use data structures in software design and implementation
    • Apply standard library data structures in software design
    • Select appropriate data structures for a given application

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Java GUI
    • Event-driven programming
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O
    • ArrayList
    • Interfaces/abstract classes

    Course Topics
    • Introduction
    • Java collections framework
    • Array based lists
    • Iterators
    • Deep vs Shallow Copies
    • Linked lists
    • Asymptotic algorithm analysis
    • Stacks and queues
    • Recursion
    • Generics
    • Trees
    • Binary search trees
    • Insertion sort
    • TreeMap and TreeSet
    • Hash tables
    • HashMap and HashSet
    • Review

    Laboratory Topics
    • Benchmarking
    • Algorthim analysis
    • ArrayList/linked lists
    • Recursive algorithms
    • Stack/queue
    • Tree
    • Hash table

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 2911 - Network Protocols

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of computer networking with emphasis on the Internet and related protocols, including HTTP, POP, IMAP, SMTP, DNS, UDP, and TCP/IP with a focus on the application, transport, and network layers. The course also introduces the structure, components, and functionality of network architectures including packet switching, error control, flow control, and congestion control. Security topics introduced include encryption and public key infrastructure.   Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on interpreting byte- and bit-level encoding of network protocols. (prereq: CS 1011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Encode and decode binary and hexadecimal numbers
    • Understand what a network protocol is and how it is specified
    • Describe the purpose and operation of key application and transport protocols, including HTTP, POP, IMAP, SMTP, DNS, UDP, and TCP
    • Describe the operation of the network layer and IP protocol.
    • Describe network security concepts, security threats, and risks related to security breaches
    • Describe important uses of cryptography in network security
    • Write applications using socket connections
    • Design procedural algorithms requiring several helper methods
    • Design and implement a simple web server and email client
    • Implement and break RSA public-key encryption and a public-key-signing infrastructure
    • Use a monitoring tool to view and interpret network communication

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Ability to design and implement small-scale software components and system

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to networking terminology, layering, and basic concepts
    • Binary and hexadecimal number systems
    • Python
    • Procedural design
    • Network applications 
    • HTTP, SMTP, and DNS protocols
    • Socket programming
    • Transport layer, UDP and TCP protocols
    • Network layer, packet switching, datagrams
    • Link layer, Ethernet
    • Network security, cryptography, SSL/TLS protocols, public key infrastructure

    Laboratory Topics
    • Network monitoring tool use
    • Network communication using socket connections
    • Design and implementation of software using web and email protocols
    • Implement and break example encryption algorithms and infrastructures

    Coordinator
    James Lembke
  
  • CS 3040 - Programming Languages and Translators

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course studies programming languages and their implementations. This includes discussions of data types, storage management, syntax, BNF descriptions, domain-specific languages, semantics, lexical analysis, parsing, and compilation. Traditional and more modern programming languages are used as examples. Students use a functional programming language to construct interpreters and translators for multiple, domain-specific languages. (prereq: CS 2040 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Specify regular and context free languages
    • Write moderately sized programs in Haskell
    • Apply regular expressions to construct programming language tokenizers
    • Use recursive descent and parser generators to build parsers, interpreters, and translators for simple languages
    • Give a formal specification of a type system and compare various systems
    • Construct an operational semantics for a simple programming language
    • Discuss storage and data management, including binding, scope, lifetime, and automated garbage collection
    • Build a domain-specific language along with tools to process that language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Procedural and object-oriented programming in a scripting language
    • Procedural and object-oriented programming in C and C++
    • The impact of typing systems on efficiency, readability, and reliability

    Course Topics
    • Implementing a recognizer for a small domain-specific language
    • Regular expressions and their translation to finite state machines
    • Constructing an abstract syntax tree
    • Interpreting and compiling simple computer programs
    • Specifying context-free grammars
    • Operational semantics
    • Specifying type systems
    • Variable binding, scope, lifetime, and storage management
    • Functional programming

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • CS 3210 - Computer Graphics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces computer graphics with implementation in C++ on the Linux platform, reinforcing the object-oriented programming concepts of inheritance and polymorphism. Algorithms, data structures, graphics primitives, and graphics standards are discussed in addition to hardware aspects of computer graphics. Topics such as 2-D and 3-D transformations, graphics libraries, and clipping algorithms are presented. Laboratory exercises provide opportunities for students to develop graphics algorithms and interactive applications. Students may not receive credit for both CS 3210 and CS 2040 . (prereq: CE 2812 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Give examples of and discuss computer graphics hardware
    • Define and use two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphic object representations
    • Apply and appraise several scan-conversion algorithms
    • Understand and apply two-dimension and three-dimension transformations
    • Discuss and apply concepts of object-oriented programming, inheritance, polymorphism, and event-driven systems
    • Describe C++ and STL concepts, including classes and constructors, operator overloading, STL vector class, dynamic memory with new and delete
    • Apply data structures to the management of computer graphics entities
    • Compile and execute C++ programs on the Linux platform

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Programming in C
    • Function pointers
    • Designing and writing C functions
    • Designing modular applications by use of multiple files

    Course Topics
    • Overview of computer graphics
    • Computer graphics input and output hardware
    • Mathematical background
    • Lines and line generation
    • Polygons and filling
    • Two-dimensional transformations
    • Windowing and clipping
    • Three-dimensional objects
    • Three-dimensional transformations
    • Projections and depth
    • Graphical user interfaces
    • Examinations and reviews

    Laboratory Topics
    • C++ classes
    • STL containers
    • Scan-conversion
    • Event-driven programming
    • 2-D Graphics
    • 3-D Graphics

    Coordinator
    Deborah Varnell
  
  • CS 3300 - Data Science

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to applied data science including data preparation, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, statistical testing, and predictive modeling.  Emphasis will be placed on extracting information from data sets that can be turned into actionable insights or interventions.  Problems and data sets are selected from a broad range of disciplines of interest to students, faculty, and industry partners. (prereq: CS 3400  and MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic process of data science and exploratory data analysis including modes of inquiry (hypothesis driven, data driven, and methods driven)
    • Identify, access, load, and prepare (clean) a data set for a given problem
    • Select, apply, and interpret appropriate visual and statistical methods to analyze distributions of individual variables and relationships between pairs of variables
    • Communicate findings through generated data visualizations and reports
    • Apply and interpret unsupervised learning models for exploratory data analysis
    • Generate appropriate supervised learning problem descriptions
    • Determine and apply appropriate experimental setup, evaluation metrics, and models for supervised learning problems
    • Engineer features for machine learning tasks
    • Perform and interpret feature selection to identify relationships between features and predicted variables
    • Apply methods to real-world data sets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in at least one programming language
    • Familiarity with common data structures (e.g., lists, maps, and sets)
    • Familiarity with Python, Pandas, and visualization libraries
    • Basic probability and statistics, including statistical testing
    • Basic linear algebra

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald J. Nowling
  
  • CS 3310 - Data Science Practicum

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students the experience of working in a team on large-scale data analysis projects using extensive data sets provided by industry, academic researchers, and the government. Students are given access to data sets and directed questions, and the students apply the theory and practices from previous courses to propose hypotheses and evaluate those hypotheses. Projects end with teams presenting their results to their client both verbally and in written form. Includes discussions of principles for effective data visualization. (prereq: CS 3300 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work with a team to identify customer requirements and collaborate on solutions
    • Apply data science practices and techniques to analyze extensive data sets
    • Develop and evaluate hypotheses for real-world problems
    • Communicate project methods and results in written and oral form
    • Collaborate with team members through agile practices, versioning systems, and project tracking software
    • Discuss principles for effective data visualization and apply those principles to real-world problems
    • Apply ethical data collection standards to scenarios and discuss responses

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Experience with data preparation, data analysis, factor analysis, statistical inference, predictive modeling, and data visualization
    • Data manipulation and analytics using scripting languages and interactive methods

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • CS 3400 - Machine Learning

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a broad introduction to machine learning. Machine learning explores the study and construction of algorithms that can learn from and make predictions on data. Such algorithms operate by building a model from example inputs in order to make data-driven predictions or decisions, rather than following strictly static program instructions. Topic categories include optimization and both supervised and unsupervised methods. Students will reinforce their learning of machine learning algorithms with hands-on, tutorial-oriented laboratory exercises for development of representative applications. (prereq: MA 383  and (CS 2300  or CS 2852 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic process of machine learning
    • Understand the concepts of learning theory, i.e., what is learnable, bias, variance, overfitting
    • Understand the concepts and application of supervised and unsupervised learning
    • Analyze and implement basic machine learning algorithms
    • Understand the role of optimization in machine learning
    • Assess the quality of predictions and inferences
    • Apply methods to real world data sets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Linear algebra
    • Derivative calculus

    Coordinator
    Dr. John Bukowy
  
  • CS 3450 - Deep Learning

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an in-depth introduction to the foundations of deep learning. Students will learn how to architect, train, and evaluate deep neural networks. Students will gain experience with backpropagation, a variety of network structures, and a variety of options for training networks. Practical applications will be covered such as healthcare, object recognition and tracking, natural language processing, and art. (prereq: CS 3400 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the process of backpropagation and its role in training deep networks
    • Compare options for training deep neural networks, for example, optimization methods, generalization methods, normalization, initialization methods
    • Apply transfer learning to leverage pre-trained models
    • Compare various modern network architectures, for example, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), encoder-decoders, generative adversarial networks (GANs), or transformers. Emphasis on topics can vary depending on the instructor’s specialties
    • Evaluate training methods and alternative architectures based on model accuracy, constraints, and training performance
    • Apply deep neural networks in the context of real-world applications such as healthcare, object recognition and tracking, natural language processing, and art
    • Discuss the ethical implications of deep neural network applications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • An ability to train a machine learning model on a provided dataset using a framework such as Keras or Pytorch
    • An ability to assess the quality of a machine learning model
    • Understand the concepts and application of supervised and unsupervised learning
    • Understand the role of optimization in machine learning
    • Understand overfitting
    • Be familiar with basic linear algebra such as matrix multiplication
    • Be familiar with multivariate calculus such as partial derivatives

    Coordinator
    Dr. Josiah Yoder
  
  • CS 3840 - Operating Systems

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the design and implementation of modern operating systems. Topics covered include the history of operating systems, process synchronization and scheduling, deadlock detection and avoidance, memory management, file systems, protection and security, and input/output systems. Students will be exposed to the POSIX interface through lecture and homework assignments. Students will see the construction of a simple operating system executing on a small microprocessor. Students will construct simple shell scripts to run in a UNIX shell. (prereq: (CS 2711  or CE 1921 ) and (CS 2040  or CS 3210 ))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify the components of operating system process management
    • Recognize issues related to concurrent processes and synchronization techniques
    • Discuss and illustrate several approaches to operating system memory management
    • Analyze the usage of memory management systems experimentally
    • Discuss and illustrate commonly used scheduling algorithms
    • Describe input/output handling in operating systems
    • Illustrate file system interfaces and implementation
    • Apply POSIX system calls
    • Construct and execute simple shell scripts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • C/C++ programming experience (including memory management, C/C++ compilation model, structures/unions)
    • RISC Assembly Language programming

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction
    • Operating systems overview
    • Operating systems architecture and design
    • Processes
    • Context switching
    • Interprocess communication
    • Threads
    • Scheduling
    • Synchronization
    • Deadlocks
    • Swapping
    • Virtual memory
    • Page replacement algorithms and performance
    • File systems introduction
    • Access control
    • File allocation schemes
    • DMA
    • Security
    • Shell scripting
    • Developing OS topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • CS 3841 - Design of Operating Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course introduces the design and implementation of modern operating systems, as well as the implementation of C programs in a hosted environment. Topics covered include the multiprocess programming, multithreaded programming, synchronization and scheduling, deadlock detection and avoidance, memory management, file systems, and input/output systems. Laboratory projects provide experience in using operating system facilities available on a Linux virtual machine. (prereq: CE 2812 , CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the core concepts and terminology associated with operating systems
    • Communicate effectively using proper grammar and technical writing in lab reports and assignments
    • Develop and implement programs in C in a hosted environment
    • Develop and use dynamic memory in a software application
    • Develop and manage concurrency and synchronization in a software application
    • Analyze scheduling problems for performance criteria
    • Use files in a C-based system in multiple fashions
    • Properly comment source code for effective communication

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in programming in C, including standard C library functions (character processing, string processing, memory functions, mathematical functions)
    • Familiarity with digital logic design, memory organization, processor registers, and interrupt handling mechanisms
    • Familiarity with basic data structures, such as arrays, lists, queues, and stacks
    • Ability to construct basic data structures, including linked list and queues, in Java
    • Familiarity with configuration management tools and disciplined software development
    • Ability to debug C source code using an IDE

    Course Topics
    • C compilation model and building C code
    • Operating systems introduction
    • Operating systems structure and components
    • Virtual machines
    • OS processes
    • Interprocess communications (shared memory, pipes, sockets, RPC)
    • Example OS implementations of major constructs (task switching, synchronization, etc.)
    • Threading
    • Signal handling
    • Scheduling and scheduling algorithms
    • Synchronization and critical sections
    • Deadlocks and deadlock prevention
    • Virtual memory and paging
    • File Systems implementation
    • Physical devices and hard drive implementation
    • Exam review

     


    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction to UNIX system calls, debugging, and developing hosted applications
    • Construction of a fundamental data structure in C using dynamic memory
    • Construction of UNIX software using high level file system access (fopen, fread, fwrite, etc.) and integrating data structures
    • Construction of a software application using multiple processes and interprocess communications
    • Construction of a multithreaded software application with appropriate thread synchronization
    • Design and implementation of a memory debugging system
    • Design and implementation of a dynamic memory manager

    Coordinator
    Dr. Darrin Rothe

  
  • CS 3851 - Algorithms

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course extends the study of algorithms introduced in CS 2852. Common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, data structures, and modeling techniques used in the design and analysis of algorithms are covered. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming and includes multiple formal techniques for analyzing computational complexity. Students will identify or state a non-trivial computational problem, design and/or select an algorithm that solves the problem, choose among competing algorithms, and justify their decision based on computational complexity.  Laboratory activities include the implementation and comparison of problem specific algorithms. (prereq: CS 2852 , MA 262 , MA 3320 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Compare and contrast formal (e.g., proofs) and empirical (e.g., tests, benchmarks) methods for analyzing algorithms
    • Interpret the formal statement of a computational problem
    • Identify use of and apply algorithm design techniques such as divide and conquer and dynamic programming
    • Construct correctness proofs for algorithms
    • Model asymptotic time and space complexity using techniques such as recurrence relations
    • Apply asymptotic complexity analysis to choose among competing algorithms
    • Implement, test, and benchmark algorithms in software
    • Apply algorithms involving graph and tree structures
    • Describe the implications of demonstrating that a particular algorithm is NP complete
    • List at least three engineering applications of algorithmic design and analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Big-O notation
    • Java programming
    • Set theory
    • Recursion
    • Methods of proof
    • Graphs
    • Trees

    Course Topics
    • Algorithmic analysis
    • Mathematic tools
    • Divide and conquer algorithms
    • Greedy algorithms
    • Dynamic programming algorithms
    • Graph algorithms such as breadth-first and depth-first search
    • NP completeness

    Laboratory Topics
    • Algorithmic analysis
    • Divide and conquer algorithms (e.g., sorting algorithms), including writing and solving recurrence relations
    • Greedy algorithms
    • Dynamic programming algorithms
    • Graph algorithms
    • Independent research presentation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Ronald J. Nowling
  
  • CS 3860 - Database Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the theory and practice of database design and application, with an emphasis on relational models. Dimensional, non-relational, and other topical data models are introduced. Topics include SQL, database design using entity-relation modeling and normalization techniques, database application programming, object to relational mapping, authentication and access control, concurrency, and performance optimization. Lab assignments reinforce the lecture material. (prereq: CS 2852 , MA 2310 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Design database models using entity-relationship modeling, relational modeling, and normalization techniques
    • Use standard database languages (e.g. SQL) for querying, manipulating, and basic management of databases
    • Design relational database applications
    • Document database designs
    • Describe the purposes and typical mechanisms for maintaining security and confidentiality
    • Understand basic database integrity properties of atomicity, concurrency, isolation, and durability
    • Understand CAP Theorem concepts of consistency, availability, and partitioning
    • Understand and be able to apply transaction processing and integrity constraints
    • Understand fundamentals of query processing and query performance optimization
    • Be aware of modern trends in the area of database systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understand and apply data structures and algorithms
    • Use appropriate algorithms (and associated data structures) to solve complex problems
    • Analyze the time complexity of algorithms, both sequential and recursive
    • Use data structures in software design and implementation

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and prerequisite review
    • Entity-relationship model and relational model
    • Relational model
    • SQL
    • Functional dependencies, normalization, relational design, and query optimization
    • Relational algebra and calculus, data definition and manipulation languages (SQL), aggregates, and updates
    • Record storage, index structures, transactions, and concurrency
    • Stored procedures, triggers, recovery, security, and database administration
    • Advanced database topics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Database introduction
    • Data modeling
    • SQL
    • Application integration
    • Design project design and implementation
    • Design project demonstration

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jonathon Magaña
  
  • CS 4210 - Advanced Computer Graphics

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students explore the field of interactive 3-D computer graphics. Lecture topics provide theoretical and practical knowledge of common 3-D graphics algorithms and techniques. Laboratory exercises focus on the creation of interactive 3-D applications using existing software libraries. The course culminates in a student-chosen design project implementing various aspects of 3-D graphics. (prereq: SE 2811  or CS 3210 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and apply 3-D graphics algorithms related to transformations, illumination, texturing, etc., with the aid of software libraries
    • Understand the issues relevant to computer animation
    • Develop interactive applications using 3-D graphics
    • Investigate and apply software libraries for 3-D graphics and related software needs

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic 2-D and 3-D graphics algorithms and concepts
    • Object-oriented language programming

    Course Topics
    • Tests and reviews
    • OpenGL, programmable pipeline, vertex and fragment shaders
    • Transformations
    • Illumination
    • Optimization
    • Animation
    • Texture
    • Shading
    • Ray tracing
    • Curves
    • Fractals
    • Student presentations

    Laboratory Topics
    • Software library introduction
    • Interactive presentation graphics
    • Illumination
    • Animation
    • Term project
    • Project presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • CS 4230 - Distributed and Cloud Computing

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the concepts, architecture, and programming techniques in high-performance distributed computing environments. An emphasis is placed on scalable web services applications. Topics include cloud computing, data processing in large clusters, distributed and parallel data processing, distributed storage systems, virtualization, and secure distributed computing. Students will study state-of-the-art solutions developed by Google, Amazon, VMWare, Yahoo, Microsoft, Sun/Oracle, and the research community. Topics may vary to reflect the current state-of-the-art and student interest. Students will apply what they learn in a series of introductory lab exercises and complete a final project using a distributed computing platform. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the basic concepts, architecture, and programming techniques in parallel and distributed computing environments
    • Understand how to select an appropriate distributed system architecture for a given application scenario
    • Understand how to design, develop, and deploy a basic distributed application

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction 
    • Introduction to cloud and distributed computing
    • Virtual machine monitors
    • Autoscaling computing clusters
    • Developing and deploying clustered Web applications
    • Distributed file systems 
    • Non-relational database systems 
    • Midterm
    • Data intensive processing in large clusters. Google’s MapReduce. Apache’s Hadoop 
    • Warehouse scale computing architecture
    • Map reduce and DFS applications
    • Map reduce and databases 
    • Map reduce graph processing and PageRank 
    • Distributed retrieval and data mining

    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction to Amazon Web Services - Launching an EC2 Machine Instance 
    • Creating an Amazon Machine Image (AMI)
    • Elastic load balancing and autoscaling
    • Deploying a web application
    • Non-relational database application
    • SimpleDB
    • MapReduce
    • Final project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 4830 - Computer Vision

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This class provides a survey of modern computer vision topics and a computer vision design experience. After a brief introduction to the array representation of images and classical low-level algorithms, this course lays the foundation for modern computer vision on the foundational concepts of camera geometry, feature extraction, and machine learning. Students will implement a modern computer vision algorithm in a series of structured labs, after which they will implement a computer vision algorithm in a project experience. This class is intended for students with a strong programming background. (prereq: junior standing in CE or SE program, MA 231  or MA 2314  and MA 383  or instructor consent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Interpret gray-scale and color images encoded as MATLAB arrays
    • Implement simple computer vision algorithms by operating on raw pixel values
    • Compute projections and back-projections using the pinhole camera model
    • Stitch panoramas using homographies and RANSAC
    • Interpret machine learning algorithms as partitions of multi-dimensional space
    • Implement features and describe their role in vision
    • Understand the value of real-world and synthetic testing for computer vision algorithms
    • Design and implement a computer vision algorithm

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Matrix multiplication
    • Eigenvectors/Eigenvalues
    • Procedural programming
    • Partial derivatives

    Coordinator
    Dr. Josiah Yoder
  
  • CS 4850 - Machine Learning

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a broad introduction to machine learning. Machine learning explores the study and construction of algorithms that can learn from and make predictions on data. Such algorithms operate by building a model from example inputs in order to make data-driven predictions or decisions, rather than following strictly static program instructions. Topic categories include supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning. Students will reinforce their learning of machine learning algorithms with hands-on, tutorial-oriented laboratory exercises for development of representative applications. (prereq: MA 262  and CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concepts of learning theory, i.e., what is learnable, bias, variance, overfitting
    • Understand the concepts and application of supervised, unsupervised, semi-supervised, and reinforcement learning
    • Understand the application of learned models to problems in classification, prediction, clustering, regression analysis, time-series, game play, and web-scale data

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Probability and statistics
    • Algorithms
    • Programming maturity

    Course Topics
    • Machine learning theory and applications
    • Variance, bias, overfitting
    • Learning categories:
      • supervised learning
      • unsupervised learning
      • reinforcement learning
    • Representative algorithms from each learning category will be covered:
      • gradient descent
      • linear regression
      • logistic regression
      • decision trees
      • clustering
      • support vector machines
      • neural networks for deep learning

    Laboratory Topics
    • Gradient descent
    • Linear regression
    • Logistic regression
    • Decision trees
    • Clustering
    • Neural networks for deep learning

    Coordinator
    Dr. John Bukowy
  
  • CS 4860 - C# and Program Language Design

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course explores programming language design in the context of the C# programming language. Topics covered include C# fundamentals, multi-threaded programming techniques, LINQ, IEnumerable, IQueryable, expression trees, Rx, and IObservable. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have a better appreciation for the design of programming languages
    • Compare and contrast programming language concepts
    • Understand the tradeoffs of programming language features
    • Develop tools for learning and evaluating programming languages
    • Learn C# both as it compares to Java and as it compares with functional programming languages
    • Have experience writing one moderately sized program using Microsoft development environments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in a programming language
    • Basic threading

    Course Topics
    • Programming language fundamentals
    • C# fundamentals
    • Multi-threaded programming
    • LINQ and IEnumerable
    • IQueryable and expression trees
    • Rx
    • IObservable

    Laboratory Topics
    • C# fundamentals
    • Language design exploration
    • Events
    • LINQ
    • Asynchronous programming

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 4881 - Artificial Intelligence

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of artificially intelligent systems. Topics covered include knowledge representation, search strategies and machine learning. The course introduces modern machine learning techniques for supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning and describes the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in engineering and computing systems. Practical exercises permit students to apply AI tools and languages to suitable problems. (prereq: CS 2852 , MA 2310 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of formal logic including propositional and first order logic
    • Conduct proofs of correctness in reasoning systems using the methods of unification and resolution
    • Understand the techniques involved with reasoning in the presence of uncertainty
    • Address the problems related to search, and its application to intelligent systems, including game playing, decision making, and adversarial search
    • Understand and apply modern machine learning techniques for supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • A fundamental understanding of structured programming languages
    • A fundamental understanding of data structures and algorithms
    • A fundamental understanding of probability and statistics

    Course Topics
    • Problem solving, uninformed search
    • A* search and heuristic functions
    • Constraint satisfaction
    • Game playing
    • Logical agents, propositional logic
    • Forward chaining, backward chaining, knowledge agents
    • First order logic
    • Knowledge representation
    • Acting under uncertainty, axioms of probability, inference using joint distributions
    • Supervised machine learning: Naive Bayes, decision trees, and neural networks
    • Unsupervised machine learning: clustering with K-Means, K-Medoids, and hierarchical agglomerative clustering
    • Collaborative filtering
    • Reinforcement learning
    • Data mining
    • Concept learning and inductive hypothesis

    Laboratory Topics
    • History, defining intelligence, grand challenges, biologically inspired computing
    • Intelligent agents, uninformed search, informed search
    • Knowledge-based agents
    • Machine learning

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • CS 4920 - Information Security

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a survey of computer security, consisting of the business case for security, principles of security, classes of vulnerabilities (e.g., buffer overrun), and the principles of cryptography. Cryptography topics are covered in depth, including secret and public key methods, stream ciphers, and related tools and standards such as Kerberos and PGP. (prereq: CE 2801  or CS 2711  or EE 2905  or EE 2931 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss the business case and the need for an increased focus on computer security, including types of vulnerabilities (social engineering, insecure libraries, etc.) and how current vulnerabilities are disseminated by the software community
    • Analyze computing systems with an awareness of various timely legal issues related to security and privacy
    • Choose appropriate security implementation techniques based on secret and public key cryptography, the use of hashing, and other cryptographic principles
    • Appraise competing tools for common security practices, such as public key encryption, firewalling, and securing network traffic

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Set algebra
    • High-level language/assembly relationship
    • OS and system API based design

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and context
    • Cryptography
    • Authentication
    • Guest Speakers
    • Standards
    • Tools overview
    • x86 stack overruns in C

    Coordinator
    Michael Vieau
  
  • CS 4980 - Topics in Computer Science

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in computer science that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • CS 4981 - Topics in Computer Science with Lab

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in computer science that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. The course includes a laboratory. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Laboratory Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • CS 4999 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    A student enrolled in this course is afforded the opportunity to pursue a specialized topic in his or her chosen field of study. After an approved area of study has been selected, weekly meetings with the course adviser are required. A final report, the format of which is left to the discretion of the adviser, is required at the end of the term. (prereq: junior or senior standing in CE or SE, consent of instructor and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Engage in independent learning on a specialized topic
    • Document research or study results in a technical report

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley

Civil Engineering

  
  • CV 310 - Water Resources Engineering

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Water Resources Engineering is the first applied engineering course in the water area of the civil engineering curriculum. In this course, students learn the fundamentals of hydrology and hydraulics applied to surface and ground water. This course focuses on theoretical fundamentals applicable to municipal water supply and distribution, and sewage collection and management (sanitary and storm).  Upon completion of this course, the student will be prepared for the hydraulics and hydrologic systems portion of the Civil Engineering portion of the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam. The concepts studied in Water Resources Engineering are foundational to all advanced Water Resources Engineering courses and should be familiar to all practicing civil engineers. (prereq: AE 2130 , MA 235 , MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Hydrology
      • Calculate infiltration rates using basic engineering formulas
      • Use an intensity-duration-frequency curve to characterize an observed rainfall or develop a design rainfall depth
      • Calculate runoff using NRCS hydrology and the rational formula
    • Closed Channel Hydraulics
      • Calculate flow through pipes factoring with minor losses and diameter changes using the General Energy equation and the Hazen-Williams and Darcy-Weisbach equations
      • Determine operating point of a pumping system with simply networked discharge piping and multiple pumps
      • Calculate flow in multi-path pipeline system using energy loss and continuity equations
      • Apply the impulse-momentum principle to compute thrust at fittings
    • Open Channel Hydraulics
      • Calculate uniform, steady state flow in open channels including circular and trapezoidal channel shapes using the Manning equation
      • Utilize a specific energy and force theory to analyze critical depth and hydraulic jumps
      • Calculate flow through standard open channel hydraulic control structures such as weirs and flumes
      • Name flow profiles in open channels with gradually varied flow
      • Calculate flow profiles in open channels with gradually varied flow
      • Relate flow depth to rate in standard open channel hydraulic control structures such as weirs and flumes
    • Groundwater
      • Apply Darcy’s Law to compute flow rate in an aquifer in one-dimensional and radial conditions
      • Use a pump test and groundwater flow formulas to determine the hydraulic conductivity of a soil
      • Apply image well theory to assess the impacts of recharge and barrier boundaries

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Ability to apply the general energy equation to the solution of hydraulics problems
    • Ability to apply Manning’s equation to the solution of steady, uniform flow problems in open channels
    • Familiarity with elementary probability and statistics
    • Ability to solve ordinary differential equations

    Course Topics
    • Hydrology: Hydrologic cycle, infiltration, precipitation, time of concentration, NRCS hydrology, rational method
    • Closed channel hydraulics: General Energy equation, Darcy-Weisbach equation, Hazen-Williams equation, minor losses, simple networks, multi-path network analysis, pumping system design, impulse-momentum equation
    • Open channel hydraulics: Manning’s equation, steady-uniform flow, supercritical and subcritical flow, gradually varied flow profiles, rapidly varied flow, hydraulic jumps, hydraulic control structures
    • Storm water management systems: storage routing, storm sewer design
    • Groundwater: Darcy’s law, steady and unsteady 1-D and radial flow in confined and unconfined aquifers, image well theory

    Laboratory Topics
    • Storm water hydrographs
    • Infiltration and soil properties
    • Storage routing
    • Multipath flow
    • Pipe networks
    • Determination of Manning’s n
    • Flow profiles, gradually and rapidly varied flow
    • Steady-state, one-dimensional flow in groundwater
    • Radial groundwater flow
    • Storm water collection system design

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Gonwa
  
  • CV 320 - Environmental Engineering

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Environmental engineering addresses the design and operation of systems for water pollution control, air pollution control, and the management of solid and hazardous (including radioactive) wastes. Topics include environmental mass and energy balances, water and wastewater treatment, air pollution control, solid waste collection, disposal, and recycling, the potential for biogas recovery and utilization at wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste landfills, and an introduction to environmental laws, regulations and the discharge permitting process. (prereq: CH 201 , AE 2121 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Calculate pollutant concentrations and loadings in the common units used in environmental engineering
    • Solve environmental engineering problems requiring the application of basic physical, chemical, and biological principles
    • Perform mass balances on environmental systems
    • Identify contaminants of concern that are removed by environmental unit operations and processes
    • Design single components or processes of environmental systems using simple “rule-of-thumb” design criteria
    • Develop process flow diagrams for simple environmental systems
    • Perform a basic risk assessment
    • Perform a life-cycle cost assessment

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Environmental measurements (1 class)
    • Historical developments, laws, and regulations (2 classes)
    • Chemical processes (3 classes)
    • Biological processes (3 classes)
    • Physical processes; mass balances (3 classes)
    • Risk assessment (3 classes)
    • Municipal water treatment (3 classes)
    • Municipal wastewater treatment (3 classes)
    • Solid waste engineering (3 classes)
    • Air resources engineering (3 classes)
    • Sustainable engineering: LCCA, LEED v. Envision, case studies (3 classes)
    • Wet laboratories: solids, alkalinity, BOD, chemical precipitation (4 labs)
    • Dry laboratories: spreadsheet mass balances, solid waste characterization (2 labs)
    • Midterm exams (2 labs)
    • Guest speaker; final exam review (2 labs)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Francis Mahuta
  
  • CV 322 - Environmental Laboratory

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Emphasizes laboratory methods and interpretation of laboratory results for the physical, chemical, and biological analyses of environmental samples, including those used to characterize water and wastewater treatment operations, surface water systems, and soil and ground water (prereq: CH 201 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe several of the more important water quality parameters used to characterize water quality with respect to potable water and municipal wastewater
    • Conduct experiments and analyze and interpret the experimental data to determine values of selected water quality parameters following Standard Methods procedures
    • Explain the environmental significance of each of the water quality parameters studied

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Standard titrimetric solutions (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Acidity and alkalinity (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Ionic strength (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Hardness; saturation index (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Phosphorus (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Nitrogen (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Chlorine (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Dissolved oxygen; BOD (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • COD (2 classes, 1 lab)
    • Gas chromatography (1 class, 1 lab)
    • Final exam review; course evaluations (1 class)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Lab #1: Preparation of standard solutions for Lab #2
    • Lab #2: Acidity and alkalinity of surface and ground waters
    • Lab #3: Conductivity and TDS
    • Lab #4: Hardness and CaCO3 saturation index
    • Lab #5: Phosphorus by titration and colorimetric methods
    • Lab #6: Ammonia by distillation and ISE methods
    • Lab #7: Chlorine
    • Lab #8: DO by Winkler and DO probe; BOD5
    • Lab #9: COD
    • Lab #10: Gas chromatography (demonstration)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Francis Mahuta
  
  • CV 380 - Transportation Engineering

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The class will give an overview of the characteristics and functions of highway, air, rail and other modes of urban and intercity transportation. The class will concentrate on the design of roadways and intersections. The planning process, the evaluation of costs, benefits and environmental considerations are covered. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have a knowledge of the terms used in transportation engineering and their definitions
    • Understand the steps required for a roadway development project
    • Understand how vehicle and driver characteristics influence the design of various transportation facilities
    • Learn the procedures for horizontal and vertical road alignments
    • Be able to relate traffic flow characteristics, including capacity, speed and safety considerations, to the design of roadways
    • Be able to perform signal timing analysis
    • Understand the transportation needs of persons with mobility disabilities

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Mitzi Dobersek
  
  • CV 415 - Hydraulics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    Hydraulics is the second level of applied engineering course in the water area of the civil engineering curriculum. In this course, students build upon material introduced in CV 310 , going more in depth and covering additional topics in the field of hydraulics. Upon completion of this course, the student will be prepared for hydraulics portions of the Principles and Practice of Engineering Civil Breadth (morning topics V.A and V.B) and Water Resources and Environmental Depth Exam (afternoon topics I and II). (prereq: CV 310 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Open Channel Hydraulics

    • Compute flow profiles in open channels under uniform, gradually varied, and rapidly varied conditions
    • Analyze flow through culverts, underflow gates, and overflow gates
    • Apply physical model similitude principles in open channel situations
    • Analyze unsteady flow in open channels
    • Apply HEC-RAS to analyze steady-state, gradually varied flow and rapidly varied flow in natural and manmade open channels

    Closed-Conduit Hydraulics

    • Apply Reynolds Transport theorem
    • Apply dimensional analysis and Buckingham Pi theorem to establish similarity
    • Calculate minor losses in complex fittings
    • Analyze the performance of an actual pump station with multiple pumps
    • Compute hydraulic transient pressures in a force main
    • Compute thrust forces due to pressure and changes in momentum at fittings

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Laboratory Topics
    • Water surface profiles
    • Flow through underflow and overflow gates
    • Flow through culverts
    • Physical modeling of Eagle Spring Lake spillway
    • Unsteady flow
    • Pump station design drawings and interpretation
    • Field trip to underwood Creek Pump Station
    • Control of hydraulic transients
    • Field trip to Eagle Spring Lake

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Gonwa

  
  • CV 416 - Analysis and Design of Sewerage Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the design and rehabilitation of sewage collection systems, and pump stations/force mains. Topics covered include the development of design flow rates, the analysis and design of gravity sewer systems, sewer network simulation methods using SWMM, pump station and force main design, sewer system rehabilitation, and the structural design of sewers. The goal of this course is to introduce the students to various issues that he or she may encounter in analyzing, designing, or rehabilitating sanitary and combined sewer systems. (prereq: CV 415 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop design discharge rates based upon population forecasts and infiltration and inflow (I/I) rates
    • Apply pipe friction and minor loss equations to calculate flow depth and surcharge levels in wastewater collection system (open/closed channel piping)
    • Model a wastewater collection system to determine flow rates and surcharge levels for design conditions.
    • Identify appropriate appurtenances needed for the proper operation of wastewater collection systems
    • Size pumps, force mains and inverted siphons for use in wastewater collection systems
    • Identify issues involved with major wastewater pump station designs
    • Layout vertical and horizontal alignment of a sanitary sewer
    • Design pipes, backfill, and pipe restraint systems to meet applied structural loads
    • Identify engineering issues related to wastewater collection system degradation (i.e., investigation techniques, corrosion, loss of available capacity, leakage, alternatives to reduce I/I rates, trenchless rehabilitation options)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Gonwa
  
  • CV 418 - Analysis and Design of Water Distribution Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Provides an introduction to the analysis, modeling, and design of potable water distribution systems. Topics include the design and analysis of piping networks, pump stations, water towers, and the use of GIS data in systems analysis; development of design conditions; identification of design standards. (prereq: CV 415 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop design water demand based upon population forecasts and historical usage patterns
    • Apply pipe friction, minor loss equations, and pump characteristics to calculate pressure and flow in water distribution (closed channel) piping
    • Model a water distribution system to determine flow rates and pressures for design conditions
    • Select appropriate pipe material and appurtenances needed for the proper operation of water distribution systems
    • Size required pumps and water storage facilities for water distribution systems
    • Identify surge assessment techniques and mitigation methods
    • Select appropriate cross-connection control devices
    • Identify key elements of water distribution system master plans
    • Describe key issues related to water systems security

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction
    • Water supply and demand
    • Hydraulics review
    • Structural requirements, line and grade, materials of construction
    • Appurtenances, system components, pumping, storage, dual water systems
    • Modeling theory, assembly, and hands-on practice
    • Guest lecturer and/or field trip
    • Master planning and term project
    • Testing water distribution systems
    • SCADA
    • Model calibration
    • Water distribution system design
    • Optimization techniques
    • Modeling customer systems
    • Operations
    • Water systems security
    • Integrating GIS and hydraulic modeling
    • Transients
    • Hydraulic integrity of system and cross-connection control

    Coordinator
    Dr. William Gonwa
  
  • CV 420 - Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Provides an introduction to the planning, design and operation of municipal wastewater treatment plants. Course topics include design of unit operations and processes common to municipal wastewater treatment, solids treatment and disposal, and an introduction to plant operation and control. (prereq: CV 320 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Characterize wastewater flow rates and mass loadings
    • Identify appropriate categorical or water quality-based effluent limitations for wastewater, and application rates for land disposal of biosolids
    • Design major unit operations and processes applicable to preliminary, primary, and secondary wastewater treatment, and solids handling, thickening, stabilization, and dewatering
    • Prepare a preliminary design report for a new WWTP to include process description, process flow diagram, material balances, and major equipment list

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Introduction to environmental engineering

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and regulatory requirements
    • Wastewater characteristics
    • Wastewater characterization for design
    • Flow and load equalization
    • Mixing, coagulation, flocculation, precipitation
    • Preliminary and primary treatment
    • Conventional secondary treatment
    • Nutrient (N and P) removal
    • Anaerobic digestion
    • Disinfection
    • Solids handling and pumping
    • Solids thickening, dewatering, drying, and incineration
    • Land application of biosolids

    Coordinator
    Dr. Francis Mahuta
  
  • CV 430 - Solid Waste Engineering & Design

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Integrated solid waste management systems of the 21st century must address a number of interrelated issues, including source reduction, recycling and reuse, waste collection and transportation, and the disposal of wastes not otherwise recycled or reused. This course addresses the design of systems for the collection, transport, storage, and disposal of solid wastes with a focus on municipal solid waste (MSW). Specific topics include methods of waste characterization, collection systems design, and the design of landfills and emerging thermal processing systems.  (prereq: CV 320 ) (coreq: CV 3500 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the historical development of solid waste management systems
    • Characterize the sources, composition, and engineering properties of typical solid waste streams
    • Estimate solid waste generation rates for new developments
    • Utilize solid waste data to develop concept plans for waste transfer, landfill, and materials recycling facilities
    • Evaluate and design waste transfer, landfill, and materials recovery processing facilities
    • Identify the major local, state, and federal laws and regulations governing solid waste management systems in the U.S.
    • Describe several chemical, biological, and thermal conversion technologies used in solid waste management systems
    • Select the appropriate mix of technologies for solid waste management program development

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Francis Mahuta
  
  • CV 500 - Environmental Chemistry

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Course topics include the following: (1) electroneutrality and its application to water analysis; (2) rates of chemical and biochemical reactions; (3) acid-base reactions and the carbonate system; (4) complexation reactions and chelation; (5) precipitation and dissolution reactions; (6) oxidation-reduction reactions; (7) a survey of organic chemistry and how organic compounds react and behave in the environment; (8) adsorption reactions; and (9) a survey of environmental laboratory procedures and analytical techniques in environmental chemistry. Students will also participate in several labs that will illustrate the course topics, including alkalinity, BOD/COD, lime/soda-ash softening, and carbon adsorption.  (prereq: graduate standing in MSCV program)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the principles underlying the chemical transformations that take place in groundwater, surface water, and in water and wastewater treatment processes 
    • Apply the principles of water chemistry to the design of selected water/wastewater and soil/groundwater remediation processes 
    • Identify the various classes of organic compounds and how organic compounds behave and react in the environment 
    • Understand the field and laboratory procedures involved in the sampling and analysis of water and soil samples

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • One year of general chemistry required

    Coordinator
    Dr. Frank Mahuta
  
  • CV 502 - Environmental Microbiology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the basic morphology, biology and distribution of the major microbial groups: viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and algae. Distribution of pathogenic microorganisms (and their surrogates) in the environment, and the methods used for their quantification and control are examined. Microbial growth and metabolism, and the resultant molecular transformations, are studied. The activities of microbes in specific habitats (i.e., biofilms, rhizobia, aquifers) are explored. Particular attention is given to microbes used to help solve environmental problems and to those that create environmental problems. (prereq: BI 102 , graduate standing)  
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 510 - Storm Water Management Systems Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course applies the hydrologic principles learned in CV 4100 to the analysis and design of systems for the management of storm water runoff. Topics include the design of roadway drainage systems including sewers and ditches, storm water management system design, storm water management plans, construction site erosion control plans, best management practices, water quality modeling of urban developments, regulations, and developing cost estimates. (prereq: CV 4100  or equivalent, senior standing, and consent of program director or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 512 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will cover fundamentals of GIS analysis applied to environmental and engineering-related problems. In this course you will learn to use ArcGIS software, and you will also learn key fundamentals of using geographic information systems (GIS). At the end of the course you will be an informed GIS user, as well as being competent at ArcGIS. Topics include data sources, creating and collecting data into a GIS database, performing spatial analysis, integrating GIS data with other software programs, and conceptualizing and solving spatial problems using GIS. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 516 - Design of Water Distribution and Sewerage Systems

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the analysis, modeling, design and rehabilitation of potable water distribution systems, sewage collection systems, and pump stations/force mains. Topics include the development of design flow rates; identification of design standards; design and analysis of piping networks, pump stations, and water towers; and computer simulation of water distribution and sewage collection systems. The goal of this course is to introduce the students to various issues that they may encounter in analyzing, designing, or expanding water distribution and sewage collection systems. (prereq: TBD)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 518 - Watercourse Design

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will explore tools and analyses used to develop engineering designs for projects within streams, rivers and other natural or semi-natural watercourses. The focus will be the hydrologic and hydraulic aspects of design, establishing the flow conditions that are a primary driver of the ecological, geomorphic and biochemical processes within aquatic systems. Standard modeling techniques will be emphasized (HEC-RAS and HEC-HMS) but the use of more sophisticated analyses will also be introduced. Topics include watercourse system functions and processes, design flow estimation, watercourse hydraulics, scour sediment transport and geomorphology, and habitat design. (prereq: CV 310 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Water resources engineering

    Course Topics
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 522 - Unit Operations and Processes Laboratory

    2 lecture hours 3 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Combination of classroom study and laboratory investigation of unit operations and processes used in water and wastewater treatment. Biological processes include activated sludge and anaerobic digestion; physical/chemical operations and processes include coagulation/flocculation/precipitation, sedimentation, filtration, and adsorption/ion exchange. (prereq: CV 320 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 542 - Design of Air Pollution Control Systems

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Presents strategies for waste minimization and pollution prevention and introduces concepts of air pollution control design and the regulatory and environmental concerns associated with air pollution control. Covers sources of air pollution and available control options, the design process, applications, and case studies. (prereq: CV 320 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 550 - Physical Hydrogeology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Topics include groundwater occurrence, geologic properties of groundwater systems, recharge sources and discharge sinks, Darcy’s Law of groundwater movement, differential equations of groundwater flow, solutions of steady and unsteady groundwater flow equations, pumping test design, groundwater modeling, and groundwater field methods. (prereq: CV 4100 , MA 235 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 552 - Contaminant Hydrogeology and Groundwater Remediation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Topics include identifying sources of groundwater contamination, types and properties of contaminants, advection, dispersion and diffusion contaminant migration mechanisms, contaminant transport equations, contaminant transport modeling, groundwater investigation and monitoring, and remediation of contaminated groundwater to meet risk and regulatory requirements. (prereq: CV 550 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
  
  • CV 554 - Ground Water and Soil Remediation Technologies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents an overview of techniques to be used to clean up existing pollutants in soil, water or air in the vicinity of hazardous waste sites. Emphasis is on the remediation of pre-existing pollution rather than on pollution prevention strategies. Topics to be covered include the following: (1) surface water control strategies such as capping of surface impoundments, floating lagoon covers, grading, revegetation, diversion and collection; (2) groundwater contaminant clean-up and control strategies such as groundwater pumping, subsurface drains, subsurface barriers, and groundwater treatment procedures such as air and steam stripping, carbon absorption, biological treatment, ion exchange absorption, chemical treatments and reverse osmosis; (3) soil remediation procedures such as in-situ bioremediation, chemical remediation, soil flushing and physical treatment techniques; (4) procedures for the control of gas emissions and fugitive dust control from surface impoundments and landfills; (5) waste, soil and sediment disposal techniques; (6) monitoring strategies for remediated sites and leak detection strategies; and (7) remediation of leaking underground storage tanks (LUST). (prereq: graduate standing in MSCV program or consent of department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • See Graduate Catalog

    Coordinator
    See Graduate Catalog
 

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