Feb 23, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Humanities

  
  • HU 411J - Japanese II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 410J . During the Japanese II course, students further develop the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Also, to a smaller extent, students are exposed to Japanese culture, examining the connections between the language and the beliefs and values of that culture. (prereq: HU 410J  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Read, write, listen, and speak basic Japanese words with ease
    • Demonstrate an understanding of elementary Japanese grammar
    • Converse in some everyday situations
    • Demonstrate an appreciation for Japanese cultural features through the language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • KATAKANA writing
    • Numerals: telling time, and days of the week
    • Polite/plain verb/adjective forms
    • Particles, pre/suffixes
    • Tenses: verbs and adjectives
    • Adverbs and their locations
    • Nouns and counters
    • Compound/complex sentences and conjunctions
    • Comparisons
    • Elementary KANJI
    • Language in culture
    • Exams

    Laboratory Topics
    • Listening to the audio for the textbook is expected
    • Drill work in class is analogous to laboratory

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 411S - Spanish II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 410S  Spanish I. (prereq: HU 410S  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical and fundamental skills of Spanish presented in this course in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with emphasis on communication
    • Use the target language both in and out of class
    • Demonstrate insights into the cultures of Spanish-speaking people and hopefully, a greater understanding of the world and our place in it

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Vocabulary: clothes
    • Expressions with tener
    • The weather, months, and seasons
    • The present progressive
    • The possessives
    • Reading: Hispanics/Latinos in the United States
    • Vocabulary: The city
    • The preterit tense of regular verbs
    • Preterit tense: stem-changing verbs
    • Affirmative and negative words
    • Numbers (100 and up)
    • What is the date
    • Reading: Spain
    • Vocabulary: The countryside and nature
    • Preterit tense: irregular verbs ser, ir, and dar
    • Preterit tense: other irregular verbs
    • Prepositions
    • The prepositions por and para
    • Pronouns that are objects of prepositions
    • Reading: The Spanish Character
    • Vocabulary: The home
    • The imperfect tense
    • Preterit vs. imperfect
    • Hacer in expressions of time
    • Demonstratives
    • Reading: Mexico

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • HU 412CH - Chinese III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 411CH , Chinese II. (prereq: HU 411CH  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Read, write, listen and speak elevated level of Chinese words and sentences
    • Demonstrate an understanding of intermediate level of Chinese grammar
    • Converse in everyday situations
    • Demonstrate an appreciation for Chinese culture features through the language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 412F - French III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course, a continuation of French II, will provide the students with the remaining major grammar aspects of the language. These aspects include reflexive verbs, irregular verbs, the imperfect, subjunctive, conditional and future tenses, as well as possessive and demonstrative pronouns. In terms of vocabulary, the students will have a chance to read short excerpts from French newspapers and magazines. The spoken aspect of the language will be enhanced by television news programs from Paris and more of the course being conducted in French. The cultural aspects will be complemented by videos and film, and short incursions into art and literature. (prereq: HU 411F  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the French language grammatically
    • Write short, correct sentences in sequence on a given topic
    • Translate with ease simple sentences from French to English
    • Describe the French way of life and culture

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Verbs
    • Pronouns
    • Prepositions
    • Cultural aspects
    • Readings
    • Reviews
    • Tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 412G - German III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 411G  German II. (prereq: HU 411G  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of German grammar and pronunciation
    • Strengthen their understanding of German grammar
    • Strengthen their conversational skills in German

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 412I - Italian III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 411I  Italian II. (prereq: HU 411I  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical and fundamental skills of Italian presented in this course in reading, writing, listening, and speaking
    • Use practically and creatively the target language both in and out of class
    • Have insights into the cultures of Italian-speaking people and hopefully, greater understanding of the world and our place

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 412J - Japanese III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 411J  Japanese II. During the Japanese III course, students will achieve communicative competence of the Japanese language in four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. A large part of the time will be devoted to class exercises. (prereq: HU 411J  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Read, write, listen and speak elevated level of Japanese words and sentences
    • Demonstrate an understanding intermediate level of Japanese grammar
    • Converse in everyday situations
    • Demonstrate appreciation for Japanese culture features through the language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Comparisons
    • Formation of the “–n desu” construction
    • Making a request, using the “–te” form + “kudasai”
    • Nouns and Counters
    • Abbreviations verbal expressions, using “desu”
    • Expressing decision and purpose
    • Making verbal ending forms of inviting and responding
    • Describing a resultant state
    • Making noun-modifying (adjectival) clauses
    • Compound/complex sentences and conjunctions
    • Expressing past experiences and hearsay
    • Elementary KANJI (along with classes)
    • Language in culture (along with every class)
    • Exams

    Laboratory Topics
    • Listening to the audio for textbook and workbook is expected
    • Drill work in class is analogous to laboratory work

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 412S - Spanish III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 411S  Spanish II. (prereq: HU 411S  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical and fundamental skills of Spanish presented in this course in reading, writing, listening, and speaking
    • Use the target language both in and out of class
    • Describe insights into the cultures of Spanish-speaking people and hopefully, greater understanding of the world and our place

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Vocabulary: mail and banking
    • Direct-object pronouns
    • Indirect-object pronouns
    • Indirect and direct object pronouns with the verb
    • Formation of adverbs
    • Reading: The Mexican Voice-Artistic and Personal Expression
    • Vocabulary: The student residence and daily life
    • Reflexive pronouns and verbs
    • The impersonal se
    • The present perfect tense
    • The past perfect tense
    • Passive voice
    • Reading: Central America and the Antilles
    • Vocabulary: The railroad station and telephone calls
    • The future tense
    • The conditional
    • Comparisons
    • The tu command forms
    • Reading; South American
    • Vocabulary: The highway
    • The present subjunctive formation
    • The usted, ustedes, and nostros commands
    • The subjunctive in indirect commands
    • The subjunctive with expressions of emotions
    • The subjunctive with expressions of doubt, denial, and disbelief
    • Reading: South American voices

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • HU 413G - German IV

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This conversation and composition course is taught primarily in German. Grammar is reviewed as needed. Vocabulary review and expansion is addressed through the reading material. Course grades are determined by short quizzes, weekly writing assignments, class participation, and a midterm and final exam. (prereq: HU 412G  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrated improved German speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills
    • Demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of German grammar and vocabulary

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 413S - Spanish IV

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 412S  Spanish III. (prereq: HU 412S  or consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical and fundamental skills of Spanish presented in this course in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with emphasis on communication
    • Use the target language both in and out of class
    • Describe insights into the cultures of Spanish-speaking people and hopefully, a greater understanding of the world and our place in it

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Vocabulary: mail and telephoning
    • Answering the phone
    • Conversation: Violeta goes to the post office
    • The subjunctive after conjunctions of finality and condition
    • The future tense
    • Vocabulary: In the future
    • The subjunctive after conjunctions of time
    • Formats for courtesy in letters
    • Writing business and personal letters
    • Reading: The countries of the southern cone: Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay
    • Vocabulary: today’s world
    • Conversation: The environment
    • The conditional tense
    • The imperfect subjunctive tense
    • Cultural notes: student protests
    • Hypothetical situations: “If” clauses and “ojala”
    • Emphasis with “-isimo”
    • Reading: Our world

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • HU 414G - German V

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 413G  German IV. (prereq: HU 413G , consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate advanced German speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills
    • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of German grammar and vocabulary

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 414S - Spanish V

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 413S  Spanish IV. (prereq: HU 413S  or four years of high school Spanish, consent of instructor or department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical and fundamental skills of Spanish presented in this course in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with emphasis on communication
    • Use the target language both in and out of class
    • Describe insights into the cultures of Spanish-speaking people and hopefully, a greater understanding of the world and our place on it
    • Demonstrate a greater understanding of and appreciation for the art of translation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Una carta a Dios-short story
    • Cognates/false cognates
    • Uses of the imperfect
    • Composition
    • Un dia de estos-short story
    • Nouns derived from stem-changing verbs
    • Progressive actions
    • Discussion of themes
    • Cajas de carton–short story
    • Diminutives
    • Imperfect vs. Preterit
    • Future tense
    • Technical translation
    • Translation exercise
    • La ciudad y los perros-a movie
    • Cultural report

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • HU 419S - Special Topics in Spanish Speaking World

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers timely topics that affect the Spanish speaking world or specialized subjects that reflect the expertise/interest of current Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department faculty.  The course is taught in Spanish. (prereq: HU 414S )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies by instructor and topic

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • HU 420 - Classical Derivatives

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course aims to help the student better appreciate the classical heritage of the English language. It is a comprehensive study of the basic Greek and Latin word elements - roots, prefixes, and suffixes - that underlie modern English usage. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with a systematic method for increasing his/her vocabulary. Exercises will illustrate practical application. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Display a greater appreciation of the philosophy of language development and word meanings
    • Demonstrate greater linguistic knowledge
    • Demonstrate an increase in English vocabulary and improvement in spelling English words
    • Demonstrate an appreciation of the terminology of their technical course

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • History of Latin’s impact on English
    • The dictionary/definition/Latin bases
    • Latin prefixes
    • Combination of bases
    • Latin suffixes
    • Latinisms/uncommon meanings
    • Latin words and phrases in English
    • The Greek alphabet/words from Greek mythology, history, and philosophy
    • Greek bases/combination of bases
    • Greek prefixes
    • Greek suffixes
    • The law/literary terms/terms from various occupations
    • Scientific language
    • Animals/colors
    • Meteorology/minerals
    • Tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 421 - Literary Genres

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the conventions of the novel, short story, poetry, and drama and to provide them with the tools they need in order to interpret, evaluate, and appreciate quality literature. By providing students with a richly diverse menu of selections, which balance the classic with the contemporary, it is hoped that they will develop a habit of reading quality literature because it holds their interest, helps them reflect on and understand the human condition better, and affords them much pleasure. The course focuses on class discussions involving the analysis and interpretation of many selections in each genre, but also considers, at times, historical, political, and social forces which may impact on a writer’s vision. It also considers major approaches to literary criticism. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize the characteristics of a drama, short story, or poem and understand the structure of the work
    • Analyze and interpret a given drama, short story, or poem
    • Recognize the difference between popular and quality literature
    • Appreciate the contributions of specific authors to the body of literature
    • Understand and apply the main critical theories used to analyze and interpret literature

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No previous literature course is required; however, it is expected that students will apply and build on the learned knowledge from previous literature courses and language skills learned from their GS 1001  and GS 1003  and courses in their class discussions and writing. Examples of such skills are the recognition of figurative language and their understanding of character and plot as well as their ability to articulate their responses to the selections they read

    Course Topics
    • Discussion of drama and terms used in drama
    • Specific dramas, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Beckett
    • Live theatre experience
    • Discussion of terms used in the short story
    • Discussion of critical theories
    • Discussion of short stories
    • Discussion of poetry and terms used in poetry
    • Discussion of specific poems by the following authors
    • Critical essays
    • Tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 422 - British Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course acquaints students with a significant range of British literature beginning with the Middle Ages and continuing through the 21st century. Students learn of the social, historical, political, religious, and economic factors which influenced writers of each period. The course covers poetry, essays, short stories, drama, and a novel. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify characteristics of major periods including: The Anglo-Saxon, The Medieval, The Elizabethan, The Age of Reason, Victorian, Modern
    • Identify important authors of each period
    • Identify representative selections of literature from each period
    • Identify the structure and characteristics of poetry, the essay, the short story, the novel, and drama
    • Identify primary components of literature such as: character, plot, setting, conflict, point of view, persona, figurative language, prosody, sonnet, epic, pastoral, the unities of time, place, and action

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No prerequisites; however, it is expected that the student will apply language arts skills learned in GS 1001  and speaking skills learned in GS 1003 . An example of language arts skills would be the ability to analyze figurative language and sentence structure. An example of speaking skills would be the ability to participate in a group discussion on a particular work and/or author

    Course Topics
    • The Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods
    • The Renaissance (Elizabethan) Period
    • Shakespearean Drama
    • The Age of Reason Drama
    • The Romantic Period
    • Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
    • The Victorian Period
    • The Modern Period
    • Tests
    • Panel discussion
    • Films

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 423 - American Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to acquaint students with representative selections from the main periods in American literature, beginning with the Native-American oral traditions (pre-colonization) and continuing through the 21st century. The various movements in American literature are explained and discussed, as are the various social, political, religious, historical, and economic conditions which helped to produce them. Students read the works of a variety of different writers in each period, and they read essays, poetry, and short stories as well as a novel and a play. It is hoped that, as a result of their reading, students will come to appreciate how American literature has evolved to its present status as a world-class literature. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify philosophical beliefs giving rise to major periods including Calvinism, Realism, Transcendentalism. Naturalism, Romanticism, Harlem Renaissance
    • Identify important authors of each period
    • Identify representative selections of literature from each period
    • Identify the structure and characteristics of poetry, the essay, the short story, the novel, a drama
    • Identify primary components of literature such as character, figurative language, plot, prosody, setting, persona, conflict, point of view
    • Identify characteristics of American literature that make it uniquely American
    • Identify characteristics of American literature that make it a world-class literature

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No previous literature courses are necessary; however, it is expected that the student will apply language arts skills learned in GS 1001  and speaking skills learned in GS 1003 . An example of language arts skills required would be the ability to analyze figurative language and sentence structure. An example of speaking skills required would be the ability to participate in a group discussion on a particular work and or author

    Course Topics
    • Discussion of Native-American oral tradition
    • Short stories, tales, myths
    • Essays and speeches
    • Poetry
    • Novel
    • Drama
    • Specific movements in American Literature
    • Test and quizzes

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 424 - Science Fiction

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The goal of this course is to, through various theoretical approaches, teach students the necessary analytical skills required to read below the surface of a text. By learning to semiotically read cyberpunk texts the students will be able to apply their knowledge to any form of literature. Using short fiction alongside novels and some cyber-text (i.e. fan fiction), we can see how the different forms inform one another and also analyze each form’s shortcomings and strengths with regard to the subject matter. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify key components and literary terms
    • Examine and understand how literature reflects current political, social, religious, and economic climates
    • Analyze and synthesize works in longer papers
    • Examine and understand how literature reflects current political, social, religious, and economic climates
    • Understand the interplay between various genres and mediums and how a work is necessarily altered or transformed during the process of translation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to science fiction, its history and its importance in literature
    • Introduction to literary theory, approaches to reading and interpretation
    • Short stories
    • Novels
    • Internet/movie
    • Mid-term

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 424H - Science Fiction

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The goal of this course is to, through various theoretical approaches, teach students the necessary analytical skills required to read below the surface of a text. By learning to semiotically read cyberpunk texts the students will be able to apply their knowledge to any form of literature. Using short fiction alongside novels and some cyber-text (i.e. fan fiction), we can see how the different forms inform one another and also analyze each form’s shortcomings and strengths with regard to the subject matter. The course also explores how works of science fiction have created concepts of space/place that influenced the broader culture. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify key components and literary terms
    • Examine and understand how literature reflects current political, social, religious, and economic climates
    • Analyze and synthesize works in longer papers
    • Examine and understand how literature reflects current political, social, religious, and economic climates
    • Understand the interplay between various genres and mediums and how a work is necessarily altered or transformed during the process of translation
    • Synthesize and analyze the power of place through the lens of Science Fiction

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to science fiction, its history and its importance in literature
    • Introduction to literary theory, approaches to reading and interpretation
    • Short stories
    • Novels
    • Internet/movie
    • Mid-term

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 425 - Contemporary Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the best of literature published within the past few years in order to enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of modern literary forms, as well as to explore important human concerns in contemporary life. Readings may be drawn from contemporary poetry, novels, plays, short stories, and essays. Films may also be used to give students visual reference to what has been studied. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify specific contemporary authors and literary texts
    • Identify elements of short stories, novels and drama
    • Identify primary analytical components of literature: character, plot, setting, language
    • Identify political, social, religious, and aesthetics themes that are characteristics of contemporary literature

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No previous literature courses required; however, it is expected that the student will apply language arts skills learned in GS 1001  and speaking skills learned in GS 1003  

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to literary theory, approaches to reading and interpretation
    • Short stories
    • Poetry
    • Literary nonfiction
    • Novel
    • Play
    • Quizzes and tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 426 - Survey of Developing World Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course acquaints students with a variety of modern works by authors from developing world countries. As a result, students learn about the literature as well as the social, philosophical, and religious themes which concern writers in developing nations. Films may be used to give the students visual reference to what has been studied. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify specific authors and texts from Latin America, India, Africa, and the Middle East
    • Identify elements of short stories, novels and drama
    • Identify primary analytical components of literature: character, plot, setting, language
    • Identify emerging political, social, religious themes that particularly affect developing world countries

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • No previous literature courses required; however, it is expected that the students will apply language arts skills learned in GS 1001  and speaking skills learned in GS 1003 .

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to comparative literature
    • Introduction to literary theory
    • Latin-American literature
    • African literature
    • Indian literature
    • Pacific Rim literature

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 427 - Classics in Eastern Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course acquaints students with classic literature of China, India, Japan, Korea, and the Middle East. Students will read and learn about some of the literary masterpieces of the Eastern world. Films may be used to give students visual reference to what has been studied. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Skillfully read, interpret, and critically analyze great works of the Eastern literary tradition
    • Read and discuss literary works in order to more deeply understand human experience
    • Successfully write essays analyzing and responding to literary works

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. David Howell
  
  • HU 428 - Classics in Literature

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the development of major periods in literature, starting with the first writings that evolved out of the ancient oral tradition and continuing into the Renaissance. The course concentrates on well-known writings that represent the early social and literary evolution of the Mediterranean Basin and Western civilization. The course will be divided into three major divisions: Ancient literature (Gilgamesh, Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Virgil, etc.), Middle Ages literature (Beowulf, Dante, Chaucer, etc.), and Renaissance literature (Petrarch, Erasmus, Machiavelli, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Milton, etc.). In addition to the reading done as a group, students are required to conduct an individual research project. The individual projects will demonstrate a thorough investigation (secondary research and personal insight) of a specific piece of pre-Renaissance literature (preferably something not discussed as a class). (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Skillfully read, interpret and critically analyze great works of the Western literary tradition
    • Read and discuss literary works in order to more deeply understand human experience
    • Successfully write essays analyzing and responding to literary works

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The course will be equally divided into the three literary periods mentioned. The exact titles that the class covers will be determined by student input and interest, and the only criteria are that the selections must either be in the textbook or be easily available, and they must be representative of the era that the class is studying at the time

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 429 - Literature of American Minorities

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course acquaints students with a broad range of literature by American writers from minority ethnic backgrounds, from colonial American poetry to contemporary poetry, novels, plays, short stories, and essays. The works read are placed into historical and cultural perspectives, and film may also be used to give students visual references to what has been studied. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify specific authors and texts from American ethnic minority groups
    • Identify elements of short stories, novels and drama
    • Identify primary analytical components of literature: character, plot, setting, language
    • Identify political, social and religious themes that, in particular, affect members of American ethnic minority groups

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to ethnic literature
    • Introduction to literary theory
    • African American literature
    • Asian American literature
    • Latino literature
    • Readings from authors in other ethnic minority groups
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 430 - Epistemology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Epistemology, also known as the theory of knowledge, together with metaphysics, constitutes the traditional core of philosophy. What is knowledge, and how does it differ from mere belief? How do I know that I know anything? Is certainty even a reasonable objective? Among the topics within epistemology’s ambit are the challenge of skepticism, the justification of belief, belief in an external world, the nature of perceptual knowledge, memory, the justification for belief in other minds, the difference between “knowledge that” and “knowledge how,” theories of truth, and the ethics of belief. Both historical and contemporary texts will be used. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of the theory of knowledge
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the essential problems of epistemology: the nature of knowledge and belief, the justification of knowledge claims, the nature of perception, the nature of truth, the possibility of knowledge independent of experience, the existence of other minds, memory, and the ethics of belief

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction: the possibility of (and criteria for) knowledge
    • Skepticism
    • Perception
    • Challenges to knowledge
    • Foundationalism and Contextualism
    • Externalist theories
    • Empirical dogmas
    • The problem of induction
    • Models of scientific explanation
    • Science as myth
    • The rejection of epistemology
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 431A - Formal Logic

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Logic is the theory of argument. Formal logic is principally the study of symbolic systems by which arguments are expressed, and is fundamental to such disciplines as computer science, artificial intelligence, linguistics, and mathematics. The course begins with an examination of the concepts of argument, validity, and soundness. The relation of the notions of semantics and syntax is stressed as elements of formal systems for sentential and quantificational deduction are introduced. Activities emphasize acquiring skill in the translation of English expressions into symbolic notation, and proof construction. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of argument, validity, soundness, deduction and induction
    • Translate sentences from English into the language of first-order-logic
    • Prove the validity of truth-functional and quantificational arguments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Atomic sentences
    • Boolean connectives
    • Proof for Boolean logic
    • Conditionals
    • Quantification
    • Multiple quantifiers
    • Proof for quantification

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 431B - Informal Logic

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The study of informal logic emphasizes critical analysis, clarity of language, formulation and evaluation of arguments, and the recognition of fallacies or mistakes in reasoning. The first part of the course covers the relationship between philosophy and logic, the history of logic, and recognizing and evaluating arguments. The second part of the course covers the recognition of fallacies, the role and importance of language, and reasoning used in the news media, science, and other areas of contemporary concern. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop the ability to question, to think critically, and to utilize philosophical methods
    • Think and express ideas more clearly
    • Improve the skills involved in structuring and understanding arguments

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Philosophy and logic
    • History of logic (1 class)
    • Recognizing arguments–claims and grounds, Warrants and backing, and modal qualifiers and rebuttals
    • Fallacies
    • Language and reasoning
    • Special fields of reasoning
    • Existential thinking and reasoning
    • Reviews and tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Andrew McAninch
  
  • HU 432 - Ethics for Professional Managers and Engineers

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines and evaluates the meaning of ethics and professional conduct. A guiding theme is the human search or quest for values and ethical direction in terms of professional and/or personal conduct and our daily life relationships with others. We will articulate and evaluate our own ethical principles and values and their foundations. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply the ethical concepts relevant to resolving moral issues in business, industry, and other relevant areas of concern
    • Articulate and defend with good reasons his/her own ethical point of view pertaining to specific problem areas in business, industry, and related areas

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • The nature of ethics
    • Ethical development and responsibility
    • The search for ethical principles and values
    • Divine command views
    • Human nature and values
    • Utilitarianism
    • Kantian ethics and rights
    • Justice
    • Ethical obligations to the public
    • Ethics - Employer and employee relationships
    • Job discrimination and affirmative action
    • Ethics - the environment and technology
    • Exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 433 - Philosophy

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the nature of philosophical enterprise in both an historical and thematic way. The Socratic idea of the value of the examined life and its role in our search for better understanding of who we are and what genuinely matters is a guiding theme in the course. Some topics discussed are the nature of human beings, knowledge, free choice, friendship/love, questions of meaning and value of life, and the human search for sense of belonging and home in the world. As these topics are discussed, the student will develop his/her own philosophical positions regarding these questions. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Critically examine, question, and utilize the philosophical method of inquiry
    • View their knowledge of the sciences as part of a totality of human knowledge and experience and relate the sciences to other areas of human experience
    • Develop and evaluate a philosophy of their own, including criteria for solving particular personal problems of living

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • The value of philosophy and the philosophical enterprise
    • Socrates and Plato on the quest for meaning and the examined life
    • Aristotle on friendship and happiness
    • Other perspectives: Epicurus (hedonism) and Epictetus
    • Medieval philosophy: the bridge between ancient and modern philosophy
    • Nietzsche: The search for meaning and place
    • Camus: Questions of absurdity, meaning, and life direction
    • Satire, Barnes, and Tolstoy
    • Jonathon Livingston Seagull

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 434 - Existentialism

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Existentialism may be viewed more as a collection of diverse philosophical attitudes toward life and the human condition than a specific school of philosophical thought. In this course, students will study and critically evaluate the positions of selected writers and philosophers that are often called “existentialist”. Some topics that will be explored are questions of meaning and value in life, freedom and responsibility, issues of an “authentic existence” and similar existential themes in literature, drama, and philosophy. Students will be encouraged to explore their own personal and philosophical positions on the questions and issues. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of and critically evaluate the philosophical movement of existentialism
    • Develop and critically evaluate his or her own philosophical positions on existential themes and issues
    • Apply his or her evaluations and conclusions to his or her own professional and personal life

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Philosophy and existentialism
    • Forerunners of existentialism
    • Kierkegaard and Nietzsche
    • Heidegger
    • Sartre and de Beauvoir
    • Marcel and Buber
    • Camus
    • Future directions of existentialism
    • Midterm
    • Final exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 435 - Philosophy of Religion

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The objectives of this course are to explore and reflect upon the human search for meaning, purpose, and value in life. The first part of the course covers the nature of philosophy and religion, various views concerning the origin of religion, world religions, arguments and questions concerning the existence of God. The second part of the course covers the problem of evil and suffering, death and immortality, and issues connected with the nature of faith and the search for ultimate meaning. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Question, think critically, and utilize philosophic methods of inquiry
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the place and possible limits of both science and philosophy in the search for ultimate meaning
    • Respond to the important, perennial and personal questions of spirituality by examining classical and contemporary arguments for and against God’s existence and related topics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Philosophy and philosophy of religion
    • Origins of religion
    • World religions
    • Arguments for the existence of God
    • Problem of evil
    • Death and immortality
    • Sam Keen and the Spiritual Quest
    • Siddhartha’s Search for Meaning and Purpose
    • Taoism, philosophy or religion, and related issues
    • The Human Journey and Search reconsidered

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 436 - Metaphysics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Metaphysics is the philosophical study of basic problems of existence. It considers such issues as why there is something rather than nothing, what kinds of things exist, and how they are related. Metaphysical thought attempts to clarify the use of concepts of existence, identity, property, external world, universal and particular, mind and body and causality, among others. The course emphasizes topics of particular importance to an understanding of what we are and what we do. Topics to be considered include time, the mind/body problem, personal identity and freedom, and determinism. Both historical and contemporary sources will be used. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Produce arguments for and against the reality of time
    • Identify the main theories of the relationship between mind and body
    • Describe several leading theories of personal identity
    • Distinguish between metaphysical and scientific questions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction
    • Time
    • Identity
    • Personal identity
    • Mind-body problem
    • Minds and computers
    • Freedom and determinism
    • Metaphysics and science
    • Review and exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 437 - Praxiology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Praxiology is the normative study of effective action. The course takes a philosophical perspective on the field and aims at an increased understanding of concepts used in reflection upon our practical interaction with the world. Description of action is stressed, and the transparency of habitual action is considered as the main methodological obstacle. Topics considered include the central importance of the hand, G. H. Mead’s theory of action, the Alexander Technique, and the Lakoff-Johnson theory of metaphor. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the relation between thought and action
    • Distinguish intellectual activity specific to observation from that specific to action
    • Acquire and describe a perspective on the intellectual foundations of engineering and management

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The problems of praxiology
    • The philosophical analysis of action
    • Discussion of Peter Caw’s “Praxis and Techne”
    • The technique of phonological reduction
    • G.H Mead on action
    • The Takoff-Johnson theory of metaphor
    • David Sudnow’s description of improved conduct
    • Frank Wilson
    • The Alexander Technique

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 438 - Aesthetics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Aesthetics is often identified with its major component, the philosophy of art. And while beauty is the aesthetic property most often associated with thinking in aesthetics, our experience of awe, humor, horror and disgust are also of considerable interest. The course begins with an examination of the notion of aesthetic experience in its relation to nature and art. Other topics include imagination and creation; aesthetic evaluation and criticism; copies, forgeries and imitations; objects and performances; the presentation of art to the public; and aesthetics, morality and censorship. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Reflect on philosophical issues raised by artistic phenomena and the possibility of aesthetic experience
    • Consider definitions of art, the function of museums, public art, and standards of taste and evaluation
    • Analyze the ontological status of art works, reproductions and digital art, depiction, horror and sublimity, and somaesthetics

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction and theories of art
    • Dewey, Danto and Dutton
    • Parker and Stolnitz
    • Melchionne, Hein, et al.
    • Hume, Leddy and Brand
    • Bourdieu and Cohen
    • Plato, Bass et al.
    • Carroll, Gadamer, and MacKenzie
    • Benjamin and Shusterman
    • Videos
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 439 - Philosophy of Technology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will examine the nature, history, and impact of modern technology upon ourselves, our lives, and the world we share with other living beings, both human and non-human. Students will study and evaluate various views toward technology and from this basis develop their own philosophical and ethical positions regarding the impact, purpose, and direction for technology. One of the aims here is to question, explore, and evaluate much of what we may take for granted about modern technology. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and critically evaluate the impact technology has upon our lives and world
    • Understand and evaluate various attitudes and values people have toward technology
    • Ask critical questions about the future directions of technology and explore whether any ethical vision guides the development of technology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Philosophy of technology
    • History of technology
    • Developing a philosophy of technology
    • Rethinking technology
    • Brave New World
    • Future of technology
    • Midterm exam
    • Final exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 440 - Global History I–The World to 1500

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course aims to analyze the essential characteristics and experiences of the major world regions and to consider those forces that had a worldwide impact. Topics to be considered: the ancient, classical, and medieval civilizations of Eurasia; the Confucian, Muslim and non-European worlds on the eve of Europe’s expansion; and the roots of European expansion. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of Western and non-Western cultures
    • Compare and contrast the problems of both past and present generations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Schools of history/characteristics of civilizations
    • Paleolithic and Neolithic societies
    • Ancient civilizations
    • History of the Hebrews
    • Classical civilizations
    • Rise of Christianity
    • Medieval civilizations
    • Non-Eurasian World
    • Late Islamic states and empires
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 441 - Global History II–World since 1500

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of global history from the year 1500 to the present. The major civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas are examined as are the interactions between these civilizations over the last five centuries. The course aims to analyze the essential characteristics and experiences of the major world regions and to consider those forces that had a worldwide impact. Topics to be considered include European expansion; European domination of the globe; the non-Western world’s reaction against Europe’s hegemony; and the development of liberalism, nationalism, and other Western ideologies and their manifestations. Global History I is not a prerequisite. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of Western and non-Western cultures and compare and contrast the problems of both past and present generations
    • Describe the development of today’s institutions, ideas, and patterns of living
    • Demonstrate an understanding of both the meaning and the responsibilities of being citizens in the world community

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • European Renaissance
    • European Reformation
    • European exploration and discovery
    • European Scientific Revolution
    • European Industrial Revolution
    • European political revolutions
    • Imperialism in the non-Western world
    • European intellectual development
    • World War I
    • Middle East during World War I
    • World War II
    • Nationalist uprisings in the colonial world
    • Rise of Communism and Fascism
    • World War II
    • Decolonization of the non-Western world
    • The Cold War
    • Middle East since World War II

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 442 - Modern European History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the political, economic, and social history of Europe since the Congress of Vienna, 1815. It deals with the history of Europe and European civilization as a unit, and in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries it attempts to tell the story of an integrated, or at least interconnected, world. Emphasis falls on those situations and movements–nationalism, socialism, liberalism, imperialism and militarism–that are international in scope and that have confronted and occupied Europeans and their descendants in common. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the revolutions of the 19th century and the Russian Revolution of the 20th century as an extension of the ideas of the French Revolution of 1789
    • Describe the rise and manifestation of various ideologies including liberalism, nationalism, Marxism, fascism, and totalitarianism
    • Analyze the future of European existence and the importance that lies in a “United States of Europe”

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Europe before and after the Congress of Vienna
    • Romanticism and other European intellectual trends after 1815
    • Industrial Revolution
    • Revolutions of 1824-184
    • Crimean War and the balance of power in Europe
    • Unification of Italy and Germany
    • Britain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia, 1815-1871
    • Intellectual
    • European intellectual trends after 1848
    • European Imperialism
    • Europe: Domestic concerns and culture after 1848
    • Europe: Foreign policy, 1871-1914
    • World War I and the peace settlements
    • Bolshevik Revolution
    • European intellectual trends after 1914
    • Stalin and the Soviet Union
    • Rise of Fascism in Italy and Germany
    • World economic crisis
    • The road to war in Europe, 1933-1939
    • World War II in Europe
    • The origins of Cold War in Europe
    • Political shifts in post-war Europe
    • The end of European empires
    • Unrest in East Europe
    • Collapse of Communist empires, the rise of the EU, and Thatcher
    • Tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 443 - Russian History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will introduce the student to Russia through both a geographic and an ethnic analysis of the country. The course will cover the 1917 Revolution and its causes, the establishment of the Communist dictatorship, the formation of Russia, the Stalinist years, and the aftermath of Stalin. The last part of the course will deal with Russian foreign policy and international Communism, with particular emphasis on the Sino-Soviet conflict and its implications. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the difference in meaning between Russia and Soviet Union
    • Evaluate the impact of geography on both Russian and Soviet history
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the history, development, and nature of Communism in the former Soviet Union
    • Interpret today’s happenings in Russia and the former Soviet Union

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Russian geography/Survey of the Russian republics
    • Survey of Russian history to 1900
    • Principles of Marxism and of Leninism
    • Rise of revolutionary political parties
    • Russo-Japanese War, 1904-1905
    • Revolution of 1905
    • The Constitutional Experiment
    • World War I
    • The Revolutions of 1917
    • Civil War
    • New Economic Policy
    • Foreign policy in the 1920s
    • Creation of the USSR/Lenin’s death
    • Lenin/Trotsky controversy
    • The Five-Year Plans, Stalin’s consolidation of Totalitarianism
    • Education/religion
    • Russian foreign policy under Stalin
    • World War II
    • Aftermath of World War II and Cold War
    • Death of Stalin and rise of Khrushchev
    • Soviet Union under Khrushchev
    • Soviet Union under Brezhnev
    • Gorbachev, Perestroika, and Glasnost
    • Collapse of the Soviet Union, Commonwealth of Independent States

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 444 - United States History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents a synopsis of American history highlighting the significant events which have shaped our heritage. Special detail is paid to the U.S. Civil War as an event which almost resulted in the dissolution of the Union. Successive historical periods are covered with fields of politics, culture, and economics. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the development of sectional communities in its early colonial history
    • Explain the sectional rivalry that erupts in the American Civil War
    • Explain the expansion of federal power domestically since the end of the Civil War
    • Describe the growing international role the United States has played since the end of the Civil War
    • Analyze the causes and effects of the American Revolution, the Civil War, and the two World Wars

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Origins of American colonial communities
    • Colonial society in the 18th century
    • American Revolution
    • Constitution and Early Republic
    • Origins and consequences of sectional issues
    • Development of the Second America Party System
    • Civil War
    • Reconstruction
    • Gilded Age
    • International events in the late 19th and early 20th centuries
    • Progressive Age
    • New Deal
    • America in World War II
    • The Early Cold War
    • The 1960s and Vietnam
    • America since the 1970s

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 445 - United States History I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course presents a synopsis of American history from the period of the earliest English settlement up through the United States Civil War. The course examines significant political, social, and constitutional events that have shaped our national heritage during this period. The principal focus of the course is upon the development of sectional communities and the conflicts between those sections that ultimately led to the Civil War. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe a framework for better understanding the forces that have been active in shaping the American heritage
    • Explain the particular importance of the history of the nature of the federal union prior to and up through the Civil War

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 446 - United States History II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course presents a synopsis of American history from the period of Reconstruction following the United States Civil War to the present. The course examines significant political, social, and constitutional events that have shaped our national heritage during this period. The principal focus of the course is upon the growth of the federal government and federal power in both the domestic and international spheres. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe a framework for better understanding the forces that have been active in shaping the history of the United States since the Civil War
    • Explain the importance of the history of the growth of federal power in the domestic and international arenas since the Civil War, particularly during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 447 - History of the Middle East

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a general survey of the history of the Middle East from ancient times to the present with an emphasis on the period after 1700. The course examines the various cultures of the Middle East and how those cultures have interacted. Of particular importance will be the rise of Islam, the effect of western influence upon the Middle East after 1700, and the Arab-Israeli conflict of the twentieth century. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the Middle East from ancient times to the present
    • Describe the origins of Islam and the colonial history of the Middle East
    • Explain the key theme that the Arab people have developed a progressively stronger sense of identity
    • Describe the obstacles that have prevented the Arab people from realizing their goal of a single Arab nation state

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 448 - World War II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a general survey of the history of the causes, course, and consequences of World War II. The course focuses upon the diplomatic, political, and military facets of the war and those ideological forces that gave rise to the war. Topics that will be covered include the final diplomatic settlement of World War I, the rise of communism and fascism in Europe, the march to war in Europe and Asia, the European and Pacific Theaters of Operation, the Holocaust, and the origins of the Cold War. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the events that caused World War II
    • Describe the events that comprised the course of World War II
    • Describe how World War II was largely a clash between the ideologies of fascism and communism
    • Describe ideological and racial origins of the “second holocaust” against the millions of Soviet soldiers made prisoner by the Nazis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 449 - German History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a survey of German history from classical times through the present day. The course will focus upon the growth of Germany, particularly its establishment as a nation-state and the role that it played in European history from 1870 to the present. The course will also examine the political, social, economic, and foreign policy trends that have shaped Germany and its people. Finally, the course will examine the historiographical trends that have emerged from the study of German history. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the history of Germany from classic times to the present
    • Describe the general development of German culture
    • Explain whether Germany had a unique historical development when compared to other European cultures
    • Analyze the “sonderweg” or the “peculiar path” of historical development

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 484 - Art History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The course provides a general overview of art history in the Western world from the age of Classical Greece to the present. The course will cover the technical terminology used to evaluate art and will examine the major periods of art history including Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Neo-Classical, Academic, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Fauvism and Expressionism, Abstract Expressionism, and art in the Western world since the 1960s. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the periods within the history of Western art from the Classical Age to the twentieth century
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic vocabulary of technical terms used to describe art including formal elements (line, value, color, and texture), compositional elements (balance, proportion, rhythm, and scale), space (perspective and foreshortening), and content (representation art, abstract art, nonrepresentational art, context, and iconography)
    • Apply the knowledge of the history of Western art and the knowledge of technical terms used to describe art to an analysis of the works of art in the Grohmann Museum or similar collection

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Thinking and talking about art
    • Form and formal elements in art
    • Composition and space
    • Content, context, and iconography
    • The art of Classical Greece
    • The art of Rome
    • The art of the Middle Ages
    • The art of Europe 1200-1400
    • The Italian Renaissance
    • The Northern Renaissance
    • Baroque art and architecture
    • Rococo and Neo-Classical
    • Romantic era art
    • Academic art, photography, and realism
    • Impressionism
    • Post-Impressionism and Modernism
    • Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, and Dadaism
    • Modern art 1919-1945
    • Post World War II art

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 485 - Fine Arts

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course studies the fine arts including visual arts, music, theater and dance through classroom and actual experience. Attendance at concerts, a play, and visits to art galleries will be an essential part of the course. Slides, films and recordings in the classroom will support these pursuits. The emphasis will be on how to enjoy aspects of each with an overview of the creative process. Analytical written reports will be required. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the source elements of creativity and how they apply to the Fine Arts and themselves
    • Describe the sensual elements involved in the Arts including basic vocabulary and media
    • Explain work in its historical context
    • Realize and describe how one is already involved in the arts
    • Describe the interrelatedness of all the various specialties in the fine arts
    • Be aware of and describe each person’s relationship and involvement in the arts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • What is fine art?
    • Orchestra composition
    • History of classical music
    • Historical tree of your favorite music
    • Themes and purposes of art
    • The visual elements
    • Artist interview
    • Media
    • Fine arts in history
    • The twentieth century
    • Trends of contemporary art
    • Quizzes/tests
    • Final exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 486 - Theatre Arts

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Enjoyment of theatre is increased by experiencing it, by understanding the range of its forms and its history. This is a survey course in theatre history and appreciation. Where appropriate, we will build in occasional “experiential” elements to help students better understand some of the principles of the subject. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the rich and long history of theatre
    • Become familiar with and explain the different genres within theatre
    • Describe the influence of famous playwrights, actors, and directors
    • Interpret theatre as a form of cultural expression

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • General introduction to the course
    • The theatre of Greece and Rome
    • Theatre in the Middle Ages
    • The Renaissance and Neoclassical Eras
    • Theatre and reform
    • Theatre into the new millennium
    • The business of theatre and the role of audience
    • How to read and see a play
    • Making theatre today
    • Playwrights, actors, and directors
    • Designers and technicians
    • Exams
    • Student projects and presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 487 - Visual Arts

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course studies the visual arts through history from the primitive to the present. Emphasis is placed on definition, context, purpose, and personal significance. The design is for the non-art student and displays the effects of art on the everyday life of all people. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the relevance of visual arts throughout history to humankind
    • Describe tools and methods of making art
    • Articulate student’s personal involvement and interest in the arts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Living with art
    • What is art?
    • Themes and purposes of art
    • The visual elements
    • Principles of design
    • Two-dimensional media
    • Three-dimensional media
    • Arts in time and history
    • The twentieth century
    • Trends of contemporary art
    • Quizzes/tests
    • Final exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • HU 488 - Music History & Appreciation

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will give the student an opportunity to deepen their understanding of “what makes music great”, and to appreciate those elements that combine to cause music to uniquely touch human beings. Adult professionals in the field trained at our university must have social and cultural sophistication in their lives in order to fit readily into the corporate or medical world. This class is designed to make you a better professional by teaching you a “non-musicians” appreciation for the beauty and complexity of music and by introducing you to some of the remarkable musical eras that have produced the modern musical world. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the history of modern popular music
    • Describe the evolution of popular music in three genres–country, jazz, and punk rock–throughout the twentieth century
    • Understand the issues, ideas, and environments that helped give birth to musical forms
    • Recognize that music is more than simply the sum of its notes: it is about how we live our lives

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Listening to reason: learning to study music (3 classes)
    • The creation of modern country music (3 classes)
    • Country music comes of age (3 classes)
    • The birth of the cool: jazz in America (3 classes)
    • The cool goes global: Monk in France–and beyond (3 classes)
    • From jazz to–what? The legacy of an American art form (3 classes)
    • The return of the 70s (3 classes)
    • The rise of punk rock (3 classes)
    • The fall(?) of punk rock (3 classes)
    • The current landscape of American popular music (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  • HU 489 - Film and Media Studies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the technique and principles of film as an artistic medium.  Topics include basic elements of film studies (narrative, mise-en-scène, composition and image, sound); film production (film structure, role of director, role of producer, cinematography, acting, editing); film genres and approaches to film criticism.  A history of film and media includes thematic, visual, sound, and technical milestones, and places that history within the context of American culture and society. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe basic elements of film making, both technical and artistic
    • Explain film theory and major film movements in the history of the field
    • Examine the relationship of film to other art forms and media
    • Perform analysis and interpretation of films and media using vocabulary of the field and placing discussion of meaning within the context of both individual viewers and the larger culture of society

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 489H - Film and Media Studies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the technique and principles of film as an artistic medium.  Topics include basic elements of film studies (narrative, mise-en-scène, composition and image, sound); film production (film structure, role of director, role of producer, cinematography, acting, editing); film genres and approaches to film criticism.  A history of film and media includes thematic, visual, sound, and technical milestones, and places that history within the context of American culture and society.  This course will pay close attention to the ways that the power of place is represented in the cinematic realm.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe basic elements of film making, both technical and artistic
    • Explain film theory and major film movements in the history of the field
    • Examine the relationship of film to other art forms and media
    • Perform analysis and interpretation of films and media using vocabulary of the field and placing discussion of meaning within the context of both individual viewers and the larger culture of society
    • Synthesize and analyze the power of place through the lens of film and media 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • HU 490 - Creative Nonfiction

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    Literary nonfiction borrows from fiction: strong character development, well-developed, nuanced scenes, and a tangible narrative arc. It also bears the hallmarks of good journalism: thorough secondary and primary research, live reporting, and a writer’s intelligent stance. This course meets directly at the intersection of fiction’s energy and journalism’s integrity. The course is also designed to introduce the techniques of storytelling to nonfiction prose pieces, including personal essays, features, commentaries, reviews, reports, journal entries, and memoirs. Together, the instructor and the students offer support and critical feedback about each student’s work. Weekly class discussions and writing assignments focus on story principles-such as plot, tension, scene, and dialogue-that increase the readability of the work and form the students’ material into publishable pieces. (prereq: GS 1001  or GS 1010H , GS 1002  or GS 1020H , and junior standing)

     


    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Display the discipline of the daily writing process
    • Describe the difference and overlap between fiction and nonfiction
    • Produce a significant amount of original work
    • Demonstrate how to edit on macro and micro levels
    • Practice reading, annotating, and discussing the work of their peers
    • Describe the vocabulary and critical skills necessary for revising creative nonfiction
    • Explain how to publish nonfiction prose

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the genre of creative nonfiction
    • Generating ideas
    • The difference between fiction and nonfiction
    • Writing about what is true
    • Developing a written voice
    • Finding an audience based on voice
    • Learning to write both qualitatively and quantitatively
    • Dealing with obstacles such as writer’s block, writer’s discipline, and writer’s doubt
    • Stretching authorial limits
    • Macro-editing
    • Micro-editing
    • Revising, editing, and proofreading
    • Appling feedback
    • Knowing when it’s finished
    • The publication process

    Coordinator
    Dr. David Howell

  
  • HU 494 - Creative Thinking

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The subject seeks a deeper understanding of the creative process by examining the nature of creativity and various competing and complimentary theories which seek to explain the nature of creativity and its origins. The course provides instruction beyond the scientific method and traditional problem solving, aiming for greater fluency in generating ideas, increased sensitivity to problems, greater intellectual flexibility, and the gaining of a broader range of new insights through an enhanced “openness to experience.” (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and discuss at least three competing theories which outline the origins of creative thought
    • Demonstrate flexibility in defining problems
    • Approach the solution to any problem with several different methodologies
    • Perform a patent search to confirm the originality of their idea
    • Compare and contrast problem solving, critical thinking, and creative thinking
    • Apply theoretical and pragmatic approaches toward the completion of a final, genuinely original and unique, project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction/class management
    • Criteria for judging creativity and the creative person
    • The creative process
    • Problem definition
    • Psychological models for creativity
    • Distinctions between creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving
    • Traditional and contemporary management of/for creative responses
    • Pragmatic creativity
    • Conception through production
    • Oral presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  • HU 495 - Humanities Selected Studies

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers timely topics in the humanities or specialized subjects that reflect the expertise/interest of current Humanities, Social Science, and Communication Department faculty. This class is limited to 15 students. (prereq: consent of course instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies by course

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Varies by course

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 499 - Independent Study

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This selection allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature survey, analysis, design, or laboratory study. (prereq: senior standing and consent of faculty advisor and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Determined by instructor for each student

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Alicia Domack
  
  • HU 4200 - Linguistics: Scientific Study of Language

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to fundamental topics in the study of language. In addition, this course explores several interdisciplinary areas of linguistic research (e.g., the origins of language, language and the brain, language acquisition, language and gender, language and writing, language in society, and language and electronic communication). Students are expected to think about possible implications and applications of the course material to their college studies, personal lives, and future careers. The course assumes no prior knowledge in linguistics. The only requirement for the course is that students have an interest in language and are open to a wide range of ideas on the subject. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of linguistics as a traditional discipline of language study as well as an interdisciplinary field
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the key concepts and theories of language
    • Demonstrate a familiarity with linguistic terminology as well as tools of linguistic analysis
    • Demonstrate an application of linguistic knowledge to academic, professional, and personal situations through language problem-solving situations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Basic aspects of language
    • Evolution of language
    • Language in society
    • Language and culture
    • Language and writing
    • Language and the brain
    • Language acquisition
    • Language in electronic and multimedia communication
    • Midterm quiz
    • History of the English language
    • Final quiz

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  • HU 4300 - Philosophy of Education

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    As sustained reflection on the nature and aims of education, the philosophy of education has traditionally been part of the preparation of teachers. Its broader significance has risen with increased recognition of the bearing of questions of education on multiple domains of social concern. The course will consider questions of more general interest than those encountered in the professional education of teachers. Topics include: the relation of education to schooling, the tension between preparation for work and preparation for citizenship, the boundaries of educational authority, educational access, and grading and testing. Special Topics may include issues peculiar to higher education and instructional and communication technology. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze the nature and goals of education
    • Describe the relation of education to schooling, the tension between education for work and for citizenship, educational access, concepts of teaching, and the nature of grading and testing

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction and classical thinker
    • Rousseau, Dewey and Peters
    • Freire, Aristotle and Rousseau
    • Dewey and Sen
    • Hoffe, Feinberg and Callan
    • Mill and Gutmann
    • Howell, Strike and Friedman
    • Crouch, Brighouse and Green
    • Gutmann, Jencks and Kupperman
    • McGlaughlin, Wolff and Curren
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 4301 - Philosophy of Mind and Artificial Intelligence

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    The primary objective of this class is to engage in the philosophical study of the human mind by exploring the possibility of designing artificial intelligent systems. The project of artificial intelligence, or AI, can be seen as aiming in two directions. On the one hand, the goal is to use our philosophical understanding of the nature of mind to test the limits of implementing intelligence and mentality in a machine, an artifact. On the other hand, the goal is to test-or at least reflect upon-our understanding of the nature of mind by attempting to design one ourselves. Our own goal in this class will be to explore and assess attempts to meet both of these aims.

      (prereq: none)


    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of some of the history and philosophical foundations of the study of mind and AI 
    • Analyze and apply some of the key philosophical themes and concepts concerning the relationship between philosophy of mind and AI 
    • Anticipate and evaluate some of the applications, social implications, and future directions of the study of mind and AI

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Week 1: History of the study of mind and origins of AI
    • Week 2: GOFAI (“good old-fashioned artificial intelligence”), computationalism, functionalism
    • Week 3: Fodor’s Representational Theory of the Mind, Dennett’s Intentional Strategy
    • Week 4: Some challenges to GOFAI, Part I: Consciousness, intentionality, and understanding
    • Week 5: Some challenges to GOFAI, Part II: The Frame Problem, Dreyfus’s Critique
    • Week 6: NFAI (“new-fangled artificial intelligence”), Part I: Connectionism
    • Week 7: NFAI Part II: embedded and embodied AI
    • Week 8: Beyond intelligence: emotions, free will, and moral agency
    • Week 9: Social implications of AI: Human-AI interaction, AI and human labor, “Superintelligence”
    • Week 10: Wild card week: Student-selected topics, recent AI news and case studies, or guest lectures 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Andrew McAninch

  
  • HU 4321 - Ethics of Digital Technologies and AI

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits


    Course Description
    As digital technologies make their way deeper and wider into human life, their ethical ramifications have become harder to ignore. Although all technologies have ethical impacts, digital technologies are distinctive in several ways. First, they operate by processing information. On the one hand, this simply means that computers manipulate formal symbols by following rules for moving from one state of information to another. On the other hand, these symbols represent meaningful information to us, sometimes information about us. The explosion of information in the digital age raises novel concerns about the value and meaning of privacy and the threat that digital technologies may pose to it. Second, digital technologies have changed human social dynamics in new ways-see Facebook, Twitter-which raises questions about the value and meaning of our social relationships, civic life, and political institutions. Third, digital technologies are increasingly autonomous, raising questions about humanity’s changing place in a world where machines occupy an ever-greater role in executing both basic and advanced functions.

    The third point speaks to the special importance of artificial intelligence, or AI, in the conversation about the ethics of digital technologies. AI comprises a diverse field of views and projects predicated on the idea that artifacts or artificial systems-often computers-can exhibit intelligent behavior. Today AI stands as a flashpoint for some of the most pressing questions concerning the relationship between technology and society. Of course, science fiction has long traded in such questions: Are truly intelligent computers akin to persons? Must we treat them with equal respect and consideration? Will the failure to do so provoke a “robot revolution?” But with the advance of increasingly powerful tools within AI-including so-called “deep learning”-similar questions have taken on a more realistic tenor: Will the capacities of AI systems surpass our ability to understand them? Do increasingly intelligent systems throw into question the value or dignity of human work and cognitive achievement? (prereq: sophomore standing)


    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify some of the philosophical bases for ethical concerns surrounding digital technologies
    • Apply practical tools for approaching these challenges in their professional lives in thoughtful and responsible ways

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to ethics and its application to digital technologies and AI
    • Ethics of information, part I: privacy and transparency
    • Ethics of information, part II: intellectual property, individual liberties, and human rights
    • Design ethics and user experience
    • Human-computer interaction and relationships
    • Digital technologies, psycho-social well-being, and democratic values
    • AI and human work
    • AI and social justice
    • Artificial moral agency, part I: theoretical approaches
    • Artificial moral agency, part II: applications
    • Ethical problem-solving: student presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Andrew McAninch

  
  • HU 4331 - Introduction to Eastern Philosophy

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    To study Eastern philosophical thought involves opening one’s perspective to the ways that Eastern thinkers address the same types of ethical dilemmas as Western philosophers: questions about the nature of reality, what counts as knowledge, the nature of suffering, and so on. Eastern philosophy often appears contradictory and intentionally opaque, especially in Buddhism and Taoism, where poetic and narrative writing inspire a deeper depth of understanding. The study of Eastern philosophy does not solely take place for its poetic or other aesthetic values, but to comprehend propositions and to assess them in a process of developing coherent and defensible criticisms and positions. Introduction to Eastern Philosophy focuses on the arguments either explicit or implicit in Eastern philosophical texts and emphasizes careful reading of these texts. Careful reading involves constructing interpretations or expositions of the texts, followed by systematic comparisons between them in order to disclose the meaning(s) of the works studied. It also involves developing criticisms of the four philosophical traditions.  (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the significant features of the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical theories discussed in or illustrated by the texts
    • Explain how those theories can be justified
    • Identify the ethical principles that the central Eastern philosophers argue should guide action and to examine those principles in light of the different views encountered in the course
    • Explain how particular actions and situations would be judged by those who hold to the principles and theories that are discussed
    • Identify the various forms of arguments used by the different philosophers
    • Critically assess each philosopher’s reasoning and position
    • Recognize how ways of formulating ideas and arguments affect or influence our understanding or acceptance of ideas
    • Identify problems associated with interpretation by comparing and critically assessing various interpretations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to Eastern philosophy
    • The poetic and aesthetic values of Eastern philosophy
    • The opaque nature of Eastern Philosophy
    • How to read Eastern philosophical texts
    • Literary criticism and Eastern philosophical texts
    • Epistemologies
    • Metaphysics
    • Hinduism
    • Taoism
    • Confucianism
    • The second stage of Confucianism
    • Buddhism
    • Zen Buddhism and 20th century Zen Buddhism

    Coordinator
    Dr. David Howell
  
  • HU 4370 - Political and Social Philosophy

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Social and political philosophy most broadly addresses the relation between the individual and the state. It comprises two general areas of inquiry: the nature and legitimacy of various forms of social arrangement, and particular moral issues of a broadly social character. Representative issues of the second sort include privacy, property, punishment, family, and compulsory education. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the continuous history of philosophical writers concerned with the same problems as their predecessors
    • Explain the tradition of thought while demonstrating its relevance for understanding a number of contemporary issues
    • Describe the recurring theme of the encounter of liberalism and communitarianism

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Plato
    • Aristotle
    • Hobbes and Rousseau
    • Aristotle, Hobbes, and Locke
    • Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau
    • Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, and Mill
    • Aristotle, Hobbes, Rawls, and Nozick
    • Plato and Machiavelli
    • Locke et al.
    • Taylor, Foucault, and Habermas
    • Exams

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jon Borowicz
  
  • HU 4410 - History of Urban Agriculture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In the early twenty-first century, the city of Milwaukee has emerged as a global leader in the urban agriculture movement. This class will work to uncover the history that informs this current moment. Using monographs, films, television programs, journalistic accounts, and guest speakers, this course places Milwaukee within a broader narrative of urban agriculture, one that examines similar developments both across the United States and around the world. Close attention will be paid to the technologies and engineering strategies that undergird urban agricultural endeavors. Such an emphasis will inform the course’s commitment to servant-leadership. We will be getting out of the classroom and working with a number of urban agriculture practitioners on real-world projects. Through such servant-leadership projects, students will come to see how the present is truly shaped by the past. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Synthesize the local, national, and global histories behind urban agriculture
    • Describe the technology that has driven advancements in urban agriculture
    • Connect broader historical narratives with the topic of urban agriculture
    • Apply lessons learned through an examination of these histories to a class-based servant-leadership project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The history of urban agriculture, national
    • The history of urban agriculture, local
    • The history of urban agriculture, global
    • The technology of urban agriculture
    • Servant-leadership

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  • HU 4420 - History of the Civil War & Reconstruction

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the development of sectional identities in the United States from the period of the early republic and the social, political, economic, and cultural differences between the North and South that ultimately led to the Civil War from 1861 to 1865.  Also examined are the causes of the North’s victory in the Civil War, the rise of the Republican Party as a consequence of the debate over slavery, and the attempt by the Republicans to reshape the South after the Civil War during the period of Reconstruction. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe how slavery created regional differences that ultimately led to the Civil War
    • Explain the economic, social, and military advantages that allowed the North to win the war
    • Explain how the Emancipation Proclamation and the post-war Reconstruction amendments established the idea of civil rights and equality in the Constitution

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 4480 - American Revolution

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the American Revolution by focusing upon the development of an American identity in the eighteenth century, the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, the responses of various groups (particularly Patriots, Loyalists, American Indians, slaves, and women) to the American Revolution, the development of the Constitution, and the establishment and development of the American republic to 1800. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the idea of Republicanism and how it was central to the American Revolution
    • Explain the nature of the British Empire and why its ambiguities caused the American Revolution
    • Explain the reasons why some Americans remained loyal to the British Empire and how this affected the outcome of the American Revolution
    • Explain the various ideologies concerning government that shaped the writing of the United States Constitution
    • Explain how the various debates and crises of the Early Republic resulted in the First American Party System

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • HU 4495 - Latin American History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course aims to provide an honest, historical assessment of a region of the world often marked by misunderstanding, unrest, and violence. While close attention will be paid to Guatemala, this class will also take into account countries such as El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Venezuela, and Cuba - and the relationship between these nations and the United States. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the broad narrative of Latin American history
    • Critically assess the place of Guatemala within Latin American history
    • Understand the relationships between Latin America, Guatemala, and the United States
    • Explain the ways that race, class, and ethnicity work in both Latin America and Guatemala
    • Research and write about Latin American history - and Guatemala’s place in such a narrative

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  • HU 4495A - African History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will use the country of Kenya as a lens through which to view the broader history of Africa. Close attention will be paid to the country’s recent political history, as we discuss such topics as the colonial movement, the anti-colonial movement, the struggle for independence, and post-colonial politics. At the same time, issues of economic development will also be covered. The people of Kenya will remain center stage throughout the quarter, as will the ways such individuals navigated the worlds of ethnicity, political violence, and civil war. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Critically engage with the history of Africa
    • Describe the role of Kenya in African history
    • Navigate the complicated relationship between past and present in Africa
    • Produce scholarly research on various topics associated with African history
    • Present research findings through written and oral means

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  • HU 4495C - Cuban History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will introduce the student to the broad history of modern Cuba. Close attention will be paid to the country’s recent political history, as we discuss such topics as imperialism and life under colonial rule, the anti-colonial movement, the struggle for independence, the Revolutionary movement, and post-revolution politics. At the same time, issues of economic development will also be covered. The people of Cuba will remain center stage throughout the quarter, as will the ways such individuals navigated the worlds of race/ethnicity, political violence, the Cold War, and the contemporary War on Terror in Cuba. While based in the field of history, this course will employ an interdisciplinary approach that will draw liberally from such disciplines as sociology, economics, anthropology, and contemporary journalism in an effort to address the development and evolution of modern Cuba. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the broad history of modern Cuba
    • Apply the knowledge of modern Cuban history to make sense of contemporary issues in Cuba
    • Analyze literature, film, and architecture associated with Cuba
    • Directly engage with a culture outside of the United States
    • Critically assess such cultural engagement

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Michael Carriere
  
  • HU 4800 - Music I

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course offers performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. This course will provide students with organized performance opportunities to build onto their passion for music. A diverse array of discussion topics and projects will help students build strong foundations in music while participating in their performance ensemble of choice. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Display strong foundations in performance and music theory
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of public venues
    • Perform in small chamber or jazz ensembles and larger orchestral, wind, brass, and jazz ensembles

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4801 - Music II

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 4800  from the fall quarter. This course will continue to offer performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. The course will provide a diverse array of discussion topics and performance opportunities that will help students build strong foundations in music while participating in their performance ensemble of choice. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Acquire strong foundations in performance and music appreciation
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of different styles.
    • Demonstrate strong foundations in performance practices and music theory
    • Perform in small chamber ensembles or larger orchestral, wind, choral, and jazz ensembles

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4802 - Music III

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 4801  and will be offered in the spring quarter. This course offers performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. The course will provide a diverse array of discussion topics and performance opportunities, including Spring Concert and Commencement, and allow students to build strong foundations in music while participating in their performance ensemble of choice. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Acquire strong foundations in performance and music appreciation
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of different styles
    • Demonstrate strong foundations in performance practices and music theory
    • Perform in small chamber ensembles or larger orchestral, wind, choral, and jazz ensembles

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4803 - Music IV

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    The course is a continuation of HU 4802  and is offered in the fall. This course offers performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. The course will provide a diverse array of performance opportunities including the fall concert and other community events. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Acquire strong foundations in performance and music appreciation
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of public venues
    • Perform in small chamber or jazz ensembles and larger orchestral, wind, brass, and jazz ensembles at the fall concert
    • Demonstrate technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression on the principal instrument or voice
    • Sight read at a skill level appropriate to professional standards

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4804 - Music V

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 4803  and will be offered in the winter quarter. This course offers performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. The course will provide a diverse array of performance opportunities. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Acquire strong foundations in performance and music appreciation
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of public venues
    • Perform in small chamber or jazz ensembles and larger orchestral, wind, choral, and jazz ensembles at the winter concert.
    • Demonstrate technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression on their principal instrument or voice
    • Sight read at a skill level appropriate to professional standards

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4805 - Music VI

    1 lecture hours 2 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of HU 4804  and is offered in the spring. This course offers performers an exciting environment in which to develop their talents in the performance and appreciation of music. The course will provide a diverse array of discussion topics and performance opportunities, including Spring Concert and Commencement, and allow students to build strong foundations in music while participating in their performance ensemble of choice. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Acquire strong foundations in performance and music appreciation
    • Demonstrate their talents and skills in solo performance and ensemble playing in a variety of public venues
    • Perform in small chamber or jazz ensembles and larger orchestral, wind, choral, and jazz ensembles at concerts
    • Demonstrate technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression on their principal instrument or voice
    • Sight read at a skill level appropriate to professional standards

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Andrew Slembarski
  
  • HU 4841 - German Art History

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the history of visual art (with an emphasis upon German art) from the Renaissance through the late twentieth century.  The major periods and styles of European and German art will be examined, including Renaissance art, Baroque art, Neo-Classical and Romantic art, Biedermeier art, Realism and Impressionism, Expressionism, Nazi era art, and post-World War II German art.  Emphasis is placed upon the definition of concepts inherent in art; the various social, political, and economic forces that have shaped art; the specific social, political, and economic forces that have shaped German art since the Renaissance; and the purposes that artists possess when producing art.  This course includes a short-term study abroad component in Munich, Germany. The course is designed for the non-art student. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the aesthetic principles used to produce and define art
    • Explain the social, cultural, political, and economic contexts that shape art, particularly German art since the Renaissance
    • Examine and describe in writing works of art, particularly the subject matter, media, and aesthetic principles that are inherent in those artworks
    • Examine and describe in writing the various contexts that shape works of art, as well as the purpose or purposes of the artists who produced those works of art

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung

Industrial Engineering

  
  • IE 312 - Research Methods

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    An introduction to scientific research methods for students interested in academic research, research and development (R & D), or analyzing and evaluating open-ended problems in business and industry. Topics covered include planning a research study, gathering data, analyzing data, and presenting results, as well as development of interviews and surveys, reliability and validity, and quantitative and qualitative measurement methods. (prereq: junior standing in an engineering program)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Summarize the major steps involved in conducting scientific research
    • Give examples of different types of research
    • Plan a research study
    • Give examples of the different types of data that can be collected (quantitative and qualitative) and identify corresponding data collection techniques
    • Give examples of the different types of analysis that can be done
    • Describe critical issues related to the development of interviews and surveys
    • Explain reliability, validity, and research limitations
    • Appraise and criticize others’ research through a peer review process
    • Discuss substantive issues related to a research topic
    • Present results from a research study in a written report and an oral presentation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Overview of scientific research and research methods
    • Literature review
    • Experimental research
    • Interviews, surveys, and human subjects
    • Collection and analysis of data
    • Limitations of research and reporting results
    • Peer review
    • Publications and funding proposals
    • Corporate R&D
    • Presentation of student research projects

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 336 - Contemporary Manufacturing Systems

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Contemporary manufacturing is viewed as an integrated system designed for maximum flexibility and rapid responsiveness. This course presents topics related to the design and analysis of manufacturing systems, including system improvement initiatives such as Lean and Quick Response Manufacturing. Laboratory exercises are included to enable students to practice techniques and analyze how various changes impact overall manufacturing system effectiveness. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe historic and contemporary perspectives of manufacturing systems
    • Compare and contrast manufacturing systems
    • Compare and contrast contemporary manufacturing system improvement philosophies
    • Identify and analyze important issues and decisions related to contemporary manufacturing systems
    • Generate alternative potential improvements within a specific manufacturing context
    • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary manufacturing systems by analyzing a realistic case study
    • Examine the long-term costs and consequences associated with proposed changes to manufacturing systems, including considerations of sustainability
    • Demonstrate written and graphical communication skills

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Manufacturing strategy and history
    • Manufacturing system fundamentals
    • Lean manufacturing and value stream mapping
    • Quick response manufacturing
    • Concurrent engineering and design for assembly
    • Mass customization
    • Global and environmental issues
    • Case study and exams

    Laboratory Topics
    • A weekly 2-hour lab is used for physical and computer simulations, demonstrations, and exercises that reinforce the course topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 340 - Project Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will enable the student to gain an understanding of the mechanics of guiding an engineering project from the initiation phase through project implementation and, finally, termination. The class will focus on the application of project management tools to engineering oriented projects, including the role of technology and the balance between cost, schedule, and technical performance. (prereq: MA 262  or equivalent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the general issues related to the management of engineering-oriented projects
    • Plan and develop the project objectives, scope and boundaries of a project with regard to the triple constraint of technical performance, cost, and schedule
    • Use the Critical Path Method (CPM) and Activity on Node (AON) in the development of the project schedule
    • Identify and develop project metrics and deliverables
    • Define the project by creating the work breakdown structure, responsibility matrix, and communication plan
    • Develop the project budget and understand how resources are allocated to a project
    • Understand how to monitor, control, evaluate, and terminate the project
    • Better understand the various roles one may assume on an engineering team, including the responsibilities of the project manager

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of probability and statistics

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to project management in an engineering context and the characteristics of an effective project manager (PM) including PM’s roles and responsibilities
    • Planning the project - project charter, project initiation (including objective, scope, boundaries, triple constraint, stakeholders, project metrics and deliverables), communication plan
    • Defining the project - work breakdown structure, responsibility matrix, and project accountability
    • Budgeting the project
    • Scheduling the project, including Critical Path Method (CPM) and Activity on Node (AON)
    • Allocating resources to the project, monitoring and controlling the project, evaluating and terminating the project
    • Leadership and motivation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 348 - Quality Assurance (SPC)

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Improved quality has been identified as one of the most critical issues facing business today, essential to assuring competitiveness in a global economy. While emphasis is placed upon the techniques of statistical process control and acceptance sampling, the course also details other graphical tools of quality analysis, explicitly connecting quality to productivity and costs. The course is intended to present quality concepts, tools and techniques in sufficient breadth so as to be applicable to both manufacturing and the service sector. (prereq: MA 262  and IE 2030 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and describe the components of quality
    • Understand the roles of quality in organizations
    • Discuss the importance of quality improvement as a strategic management issue
    • List fundamental concepts and techniques advanced by Deming, Juran, Fiegenbaum, and Crosby
    • Successfully characterize and evaluate process capability
    • Specify, create, implement, and interpret fundamental variables and attributes control charts
    • Utilize graphical methods for efficient data analysis and problem solving
    • Develop acceptance sampling plan OC curves
    • Specify and interpret basic acceptance sampling systems such as ANSI/ASQC Z1.4
    • Design appropriate quality control systems
    • Understand basics of design of experiments and how to design, implement and analyze the results
    • Apply QA techniques to both manufacturing and service sectors
    • Improve communications skills
    • Understand the importance of and be able to implement a Measurement System Analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Good understanding of statistical distributions, variability, and using software to do hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and conduct and interpret other statistical tests

    Course Topics
    • What is quality?
    • How is quality defined
    • Quality improvement
    • The DMAIC process
    • Methods and philosophy of SPC
    • Control charts for variables
    • Control charts for attributes
    • System capability analysis
    • Measurement System Analysis
    • Acceptance sampling

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 377 - Safety in Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to prepare the student for a leadership role in management to proactively and aggressively apply basic principles of safety in order to protect the occupational health of the workforce and the general public while improving the company’s bottom line. (prereq: IE 3621  or SS 464 , junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify a variety of occupational hazards
    • Apply analytical tools to define occupational hazards
    • Apply intervention strategies for ameliorating occupational hazards
    • Find information and other resources regarding occupational hazards
    • Understand how to solve problems related to safety and occupational health, and how to present aforementioned information
    • Better understand the critical value of lifelong learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to safety, historical background, trends in safety engineering, safety roles (organization, employees, regulation)
    • Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) legislation
    • Worker’s compensation, economic aspects of OSH
    • Accident causation
    • Record keeping and analysis
    • Hazard analysis
    • Risk perception, human error, and reliability
    • Safety inspections
    • Mechanical and other hazards, hazardous substances, materials handling
    • Cumulative trauma and other ergonomic issues
    • Employee training, motivation and attitudes, developing a successful safety program

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 381 - Deterministic Modeling and Optimization

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Modeling requires building a logical or mathematical representation of a system and using the model to assist the decision-making process. This course examines modeling techniques for systems in which the variables influencing performance are deterministic (non-random). These techniques include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, inventory models, and network analysis. Case studies and computer algorithms are utilized. (prereq: MA 2314  or MA 231 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand, develop, and apply deterministic (non-random) mathematical models to engineering and operational problems
    • Use these models to assist the decision-making process
    • Develop an understanding of how these methods impact business and industry
    • Use computer software to solve these engineering problems
    • Improve problem-solving skills
    • Improve communications skills

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College algebra
    • Mathematical procedures for solving systems of linear equations

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to quantitative management
    • Graphical solution of linear programming LP problems
    • Applications of LP
    • Computer solutions to LP problems
    • LP sensitivity, duality
    • Transportations & assignments algorithms
    • Network analysis algorithms
    • Inventory control models
    • Introduction to integer and goal programming
    • Dynamic programming and meta-heuristic optimization

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 383 - Simulation

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Focusing on discrete-event systems, this course incorporates spreadsheets, simulation languages, and simulation software to analyze, design, and improve production and service systems. The simulation process and statistical analysis of input and output are addressed. A strong emphasis is placed on decision making and design. (prereq: IE 3820  and IE 1190 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Perform simulations of basic manufacturing and service systems
    • Select, analyze, and/or design processes using simulation
    • Improve problem solving skills
    • Improve communication skills

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understanding of probability distributions
    • Queuing theory
    • Computer programming
    • Statistics

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to discrete event simulation
    • Simulation theory and techniques
    • Random number generation
    • Logic of single-queue, single-server systems
    • Basic nodes and control statements
    • Resources and gates
    • Logic and decision nodes
    • Statistical analysis
    • Simio software
    • Simulation with Excel
    • MPX dynamic modeling
    • Applications

    Laboratory Topics
    • To gain familiarity with simulation using Excel and Simio
    • A design project may be conducted as a portion of the lab
    • Also, visits to companies and guest speakers who use simulation may be scheduled

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 391 - Industrial Engineering Junior Project

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is intended to serve as an opportunity for third-year students to apply subjects they have learned thus far to a real-world engineering problem. These problems are sponsored by business/industry and require some choices as to the specific engineering tools that will be used. Following tool selection, data gathering, and analysis, the students are required to reach a recommended solution. Students work in teams under the supervision of a faculty member who leads the students through this problem-solving process. This course is intended to serve as a precursor to the Capstone Engineering Design project courses (IE 4901  and IE 4902 ) scheduled in the senior year. (prereq: junior standing, IE 423 , three of the following: IE 2450 , IE 336 , IE 3621 IE 381  or IE 3470 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Select tools, gather data, build models, and analyze processes used in projects in business and industry
    • Exhibit professional behaviors in dealing with external clients
    • Demonstrate competence in planning and scheduling methods
    • Demonstrate professional written and verbal presentation techniques

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Cost justification techniques
    • Must have some knowledge of specific industrial engineering techniques that are likely to relate to the course project
    • Need to have three of the following five prerequisites: ergonomics, work methods, contemporary manufacturing systems, deterministic modeling and optimization, or facilities design
    • Must also have already taken engineering economy

    Course Topics
    • Working with clients
    • Project definition, proposal writing, deliverables
    • Teamwork and leadership styles
    • Library research
    • Professional behavior
    • Planning and scheduling
    • Data gathering
    • Tool selection
    • Model building
    • Written and verbal presentation techniques

    Laboratory Topics
    • All laboratory work will be done at the sponsor site or in an MSOE lab, as needed by a particular project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 423 - Engineering Economy

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject is intended to provide the fundamental techniques for quantifying engineering and business decisions, especially those in which the time value of money is significant. It deals with cost, value, and work concepts and emphasizes the applications of funds invested in capital assets and facilities and the returns on such investments. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze and evaluate financial alternatives by determining the worth of systems, products and services in relation to cost
    • Correctly apply discounted cash-flow analysis to evaluate proposed capital investments
    • Acquire, analyze and interpret project data
    • Recognize, formulate and analyze cash-flow models
    • Determine economic feasibility when evaluating alternatives
    • Apply sensitivity analysis to economic decision making
    • Explain the results of the cash flow models to managers and others not versed in engineering economic analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College algebra

    Course Topics
    • Why engineering economy?
    • Interest and interest rate
    • Rate of return
    • Equivalence
    • Engineering economics terminology
    • Minimum Attractive (or Acceptable) Rate of Return (MARR)
    • Cash flows
    • Single-payment factors
    • Uniform series present worth factor and capital recovery factor
    • Sinking fund factor and uniform series compound amount factor
    • Interpolation
    • Arithmetic gradient factors
    • Geometric gradient series factors
    • Determination of an unknown interest rate
    • Determination of an unknown number of years
    • Combining factors
    • Nominal and effective interest rates; interest rates varying over time
    • Present worth analysis
    • Annual worth analysis
    • Rate of return analysis
    • Benefit-cost ratio analysis
    • Breakeven and sensitivity analysis
    • Payback period analysis

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 426 - Materials and Manufacturing Processes

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The properties of materials and transformation of materials into fabricated components and finished goods are the focus of this course. Manufacturing processes studied include bulk deformation, sheet metal processes, plastics processes, metal casting, welding, and others. The course emphasizes the relative advantages and disadvantages of various processing techniques, including economic considerations. (prereq: ME 207  or ME 2004 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Distinguish important capabilities and limitations for the following types of manufacturing processes: heat treatment, machining, bulk deformation, metal casting, plastics processes, welding, mechanical assembly, and others as time permits
    • Select an appropriate manufacturing process given part design and relevant parameters
    • Understand how material properties influence choice of and are affected by manufacturing processes
    • Develop a manufacturing process plan for a discrete part using one or more of the processes listed in the first bullet (above) that meets acceptable levels of cost and quality
    • Display part geometry using multiple 2-dimensional views
    • Present technical information in a formal written report

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic chemistry
    • Mechanics of materials

    Course Topics
    • Materials and heat treatment
    • Measurement and surfaces
    • Sheet metal processes
    • Metal casting
    • Machining
    • Bulk deformation
    • Polymers and plastics processes
    • Welding
    • Mechanical assembly
    • Other topics as time permits such as: integrated circuit and electronics manufacturing; non-traditional processes and/or micro- and nano-fabrication

    Laboratory Topics
    • Sand casting
    • Machining
    • Welding
    • Materials testing (tensile strength, hardness, roughness)
    • Plastics
    • Plant tour(s)
    • Process selection and project work

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 431 - Six Sigma Methods

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Six Sigma incorporates statistical tools and a continuous improvement philosophy to provide a powerful methodology for eliminating waste, improving processes and ultimately, increasing the financial performance of an organization. This course introduces the student to the basic Six Sigma methodology including the statistical techniques necessary to implement and complete a Six Sigma project. Students will be expected to complete a project and may earn a Six Sigma green belt certification upon successful completion of the course. (prereq: junior standing, MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and define Six Sigma terminology
    • Understand and perform the five steps of the Six Sigma methodology (DMAIC)
    • Complete a team-based project involving the design, construction, testing, and improvement of a small system
    • Develop an understanding of how these methods impact business and industry
    • Use computer software to solve engineering problems
    • Improve problem solving skills
    • Improve communications skills by writing a formal report and working together as a team

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of probability, statistical distributions, and analysis of variance

    Course Topics
    • Define stage
    • Measure stage
    • Analyze stage
    • Improve stage
    • Control stage

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 440 - Team Leadership/Facilitation

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the role of the industrial engineer as a team leader and facilitator. Identification of personal strengths and weaknesses with respect to leadership and facilitation will be addressed. The students will develop skills through leadership and facilitation opportunities as presented in class and during class projects. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe what facilitation is and what shaped it as a profession
    • Identify critical planning techniques (e.g. agendas, logistics)
    • Be in a position to give/receive constructive feedback
    • Describe strategies for managing through conflict in groups
    • Facilitate a brainstorming session
    • Understand how and when to use flipcharts
    • Describe and utilize strategies to help groups make decisions
    • Assist a team in overcoming decision deadlock
    • Understand the ethics of facilitation and how to make ethical decisions
    • Understand how different leadership skills impact team/group performance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • History of facilitation/facilitation basics
    • Effective meetings
    • Team conflict/group dynamics
    • Brainstorming and critical thinking
    • Asking questions/active listening
    • Group decision making
    • Self-awareness
    • Ethics
    • Team leadership

    Laboratory Topics
    • This class is structured such that it allows for more experiential, active learning
    • Observing group process
    • Team goals, roles, milestones
    • Effective meetings
    • Conflict exercise
    • Team project work
    • Divergence/convergence practice on team project
    • Active listening lab
    • Group Styles Inventory simulation and debrief
    • Personal leadership brand

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 449 - Quality Management

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course addresses the strategic role of quality in business and industry. It focuses on management’s role in achieving quality excellence, the structures and systems needed to support a total quality strategy, and the main statistical and analytical tools for achieving quality improvement and control. The focus of this course is global and includes applications and examples ranging from high-tech companies to service industries such as health care, insurance, and distribution. (prereq: IE 348 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the importance of quality as a corporate-wide system, rather than a separate function within the organization
    • Know how quality impacts companies in the manufacturing and service sectors
    • Understand the cost of quality and what contributes to a high cost of quality
    • Be familiar with the ISO-9000 series of standards, how these are managed and implemented within a company, and the auditing/certification process
    • Utilize various analytical and documentation techniques for problem solving, defining customer requirements, and ensuring compliance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Good understanding of statistical process control, acceptance sampling, and quality improvement tools

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to quality management, business approaches to quality, and cost of quality
    • ISO 9000 and related quality standards
    • Analytical techniques for problem solving, defining customer requirements, and ensuring compliance
    • Project/research work

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 460 - Design for Quality

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers the basic approaches to statistically designed experiments including hypothesis testing by the use of ANOVA, Analysis of Means, Student t, F, Chi-square and Z tests, and decision making by use of statistics and factorial methods. (prereq: MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize applicability of experimental design techniques
    • Plan and conduct a designed experiment
    • Analyze experimental data, draw conclusions, and make recommendations regarding process improvements

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of probability, statistical distributions, calculating means and standard deviations, continuous statistical tests, central limit theorem, and hypothesis testing

    Course Topics
    • Review of statistics
    • Hypothesis testing
    • Analysis of means
    • Applications of factorial designs
    • One-way and Two-way, ANOVA
    • Fractional factorial designs
    • Blocking and use of counterpoints

    Coordinator
    Dr. Doug Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 470 - Topics in Industrial Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course considers subject matter in several of the newer, emerging areas of industrial engineering and management theory and practice. Thus, the content changes regularly. (prereq: junior standing and consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Depends on course topic(s)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Topics that have been previously covered in this course include regression analysis, supply chain management, applying IE techniques to healthcare, quick response manufacturing, and advanced human factors.

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 483 - Advanced Simulation Modeling

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the material presented in IE 383  (Simulation) and focuses on statistical concerns. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the statistical nature of simulation. Probability distributions are examined for appropriateness and data fit. Run length is determined for appropriateness and confidence intervals are used to describe the output. (prereq: IE 383 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use intermediate simulation modeling techniques
    • Incorporate transporters and conveyors into models
    • Build and test a random number generator
    • Generate random variates
    • Model discrete/continuous systems
    • Perform steady-state analysis of simulation models
    • Employ variance reduction techniques in models
    • Conduct a comprehensive simulation study, including a final presentation and technical paper

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic knowledge of discrete-event simulation modeling

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to simulation
    • Simulation language and modeling construct review
    • Intermediate modeling and steady-state analysis
    • Verification & validation and entity transfer
    • Transporters and conveyors
    • Discrete/continuous systems
    • Random number generation
    • Output variance reduction
    • Designing and conducting simulation experiments
    • Project reports

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows the student, with faculty guidance, to concentrate on an approved subject of special interest not covered in regularly scheduled courses. This may take the form of individual or small group supervised study, literature review, analysis, design, or laboratory study. (prereq: senior standing; consent of faculty advisor and program director)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Depends on course topic(s)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Agreed upon by student, faculty advisor, and program director

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 1000 - Introduction to Industrial Engineering Profession

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the field of Industrial Engineering (IE). The course introduces students to terminology, methodologies, and software tools used in IE, as well as expectations for professionalism and ethical behavior (prereq: none) 
     
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Defining IE; historic and contemporary views of IE
    • Engineering ethics and professionalism
    • Quality, data analysis and descriptive statistics
    • Process improvement fundamentals & flowcharts
    • Work measurement and ergonomics
    • Manufacturing
    • Operations research and logistics
    • Healthcare
    • Consulting
    • Leadership and storytelling
    • Motivation
    • Project work

    Course Topics
    • Defining industrial engineering
    • Engineering ethics and professionalism
    • Quality, data analysis, and descriptive statistics
    • Process improvement fundamentals and flowcharts
    • Work measurement and ergonomics
    • Manufacturing  
    • Leadership and storytelling
    • Motivation 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 1003 - Industrial Engineering Profession

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the field of Industrial Engineering (IE) for students switching from other majors. The course introduces students to a broad array of career paths in IE, such as management engineering, quality, logistics, manufacturing process improvement, etc.  This course will also present historical and current perspectives on IE, as well as contemporary IE improvement methodologies.  Note:  Enrollment in this course is restricted to students who have switched to IE from another major. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Give examples of career opportunities in industrial engineering
    • Have an awareness of historic and contemporary perspectives of industrial engineering
    • Have an awareness of contemporary industrial engineering improvement methodologies 

    Course Topics
    • Historic and contemporary views of IE
    • Contemporary IE improvement methodologies
    • Quality
    • Ergonomics
    • Operations research and logistics
    • Healthcare
    • Manufacturing
    • Consulting 

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 1190 - Computer Applications in Industrial Engineering

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides basic familiarization, instruction, and competence with common computer applications used in the field of Industrial Engineering. The purpose of the course is to provide a student with expertise in using computational tools. These tools will be used in multiple subsequent courses and throughout the student’s career. The course will provide instruction in the use of these tools and laboratory time to practice their use while deepening understanding and expertise. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Facilitate the development of process flow documentation including traditional flow charts, pseudo-code, and hierarchical charts, and effectively communicate them
    • Demonstrate spreadsheet skills including complex calculations, descriptive statistics, analysis tools, lookup functions, and iterative structures
    • Be proficient at programming including macro recording, logic and conditional operators, procedures and subroutines, object models, strings, loops, forms, and error handling
    • Use and develop databases in a functional way including integrating them with spreadsheets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College freshman status
    • Advanced algebra

    Course Topics
    • Spreadsheet use, graphing, analysis, data management, and programming
    • General programming
    • Database structures, programming, and integration with spreadsheets

    Laboratory Topics
    • A weekly two-hour lab will use defined projects to exercise student skills as defined in the Course Learning Outcomes section

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 2030 - Applications of Statistics in Industrial Engineering

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course emphasizes the importance and relevance of probability and statistics, as well as research methods in the field of Industrial Engineering.  The purpose of the course is to further student understanding of the applications of probability and statistics in engineering.  The course will concentrate on data collection, data mining, as well as analysis and inference using statistical methods.  The course is also aimed at broadening statistical skills by having students use a state-of-the-art statistics package (e.g. Minitab, R, etc.) so that meaningful problems can be addressed. (prereq: MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe and define basic statistical terminology  
    • Create histograms and identify probability distributions 
    • Identify and evaluate the clarity of a hypothesis statement  
    • Identify the specific research question under investigation through clear hypothesis formation
    • Perform statistical analyses including working with probability distributions 
    • Draw inferences from data obtained by testing components and systems, using regression analysis as well as other applicable statistical tests
    • Improve communication skills, both written and verbal   
    • Understand inverse cumulative distribution functions and their role in random number generation   

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Good understanding of probability, statistical distributions, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance

    Course Topics
    • Minitab, R, or other statistics software
    • Methods of inquiry
    • Probability distributions
    • Measurement error and propagation
    • Confidence intervals
    • Descriptive and inferential statistics
    • Hypothesis testing
    • Correlation and linear regression
    • Multiple regression 
    • Experimental design 
    • Statistical report from mined data

    Laboratory Topics
    • A weekly two-hour lab will use defined projects to exercise student skills as defined in the Course Outcomes section

    Coordinator
    Dr. Douglas Grabenstetter
  
  • IE 2450 - Work Planning and Methods Development

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the principles and techniques associated with work planning, methods analysis, and job design, including time studies, predetermined time systems, work sampling, and standards development. (prereq: MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Conduct methods, time, and motion studies utilizing a variety of techniques including graphical analysis tools, traditional stop-watch time studies, predetermined time systems, and work sampling
    • Develop work standards
    • Describe the advantages and limitations associated with standard data systems
    • Identify improvement opportunities based on work methods analysis and work measurement
    • Understand how labor reporting and incentive systems relate to methods analysis and work measurement

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of statistical distributions and variability

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to work methods and work methods improvement
    • Graphical analysis tools
    • Time studies
    • Standard data systems
    • Predetermined time systems
    • Work sampling
    • Physiological work measurement
    • Labor reporting
    • Incentives
    • Increasing productivity

    Laboratory Topics
    • A weekly two-hour lab will give time for multiple lab exercises aimed at giving students hands-on experience with analysis of work methods and work measurement, including time studies, predetermined time systems, physiological work measurement, and the effects of incentives

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
  
  • IE 3310 - Production Planning and Inventory Control

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    Many businesses, including those in manufacturing, retail, and logistics, rely on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems for production control. This course provides a comprehensive review of the material planning and production control modules within an ERP system. Topics include forecasting, operations planning, master scheduling, and inventory control. It introduces students to ERP software and compare both “push” and “pull” approaches. (prereq: MA 262  and junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define and explain common terminology related to production planning and control
    • Utilize common forecasting techniques to predict future demand
    • Understand inventory management systems, ABC analysis and methods of maintaining inventory accuracy
    • Understand the EOQ model and trade-offs between lot size and other parameters (capacity, utilization, lead time)
    • Manually apply the MRP algorithm with various lot sizing rules to generate planned order releases
    • Perform rough-cut capacity planning and calculate relevant system parameters such as capacity, utilization, and efficiency
    • Describe the difference between push and pull production systems and explain how various pull systems operate (kanban, conwip, POLCA)
    • Relate the Theory of Constraints to production planning and control activities
    • Utilize ERP software to analyze data from a sample company and perform common production control transactions
    • Describe supply chain management and compare how DRP structures differ from their MRP counterparts

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic understanding of statistics, variability, and linear regression

    Course Topics
    • Overview of production planning and inventory control
    • Overview of ERP software packages
    • Forecasting
    • Sales and operations planning
    • Master scheduling
    • Inventory management and MRP
    • Capacity management
    • Production activity control
    • Lean manufacturing
    • Theory of constraints
    • Supply chain management
    • Distribution requirements planning

    Laboratory Topics
    • Two-hour laboratory covering ERP software (e.g., SAP & ERPSim)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 3470 - Facilities Design

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers facility layout planning methods, as well as the inter-relationships between physical layouts (of facilities, departments, or work cells), process flows, and material handling systems. Students learn techniques for generating and evaluating facility layout solutions, creating final layouts using 2D CAD software, and are introduced to analysis methods and decision factors for selecting a facility location. (prereq: IE 336 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Generate and evaluate solutions to facilities layout problems using both analytical and qualitative techniques 
    • Generate and evaluate detailed layouts for manufacturing cells 
    • Utilize the simplified systematic layout planning or systematic planning of manufacturing cells techniques on a real-world facility design project 
    • Present 2-dimensional detailed layouts using CAD software 
    • Understand both analytical and qualitative solution approaches to facilities location problems, as well as significant criteria to be considered 
    • Present facility design project information orally and verbally in class presentations and a formal technical report

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understanding of manufacturing systems concepts, including bottlenecks, utilization, lead time, cycle time, throughput, work in process, setup time, batches, and transfer batches

    Course Topics
    • Overview of facilities design and introduction to course project
    • Simplified systematic layout planning
    • Manufacturing cells and systematic planning of cells
    • Equipment and flow analysis 
    • Cell layout planning and detailed cell plans
    • Project planning and implementation
    • Personnel requirements and infrastructure systems
    • Warehouse layouts
    • Facility location models and site selection
    • Use of 2-dimensional CAD software for facility layouts Project work and class presentations

    Laboratory Topics
    • A weekly 2-hour lab is used primarily for learning CAD software and working on the course project, which is typically development of a facility layout for an industry client. The project lab time is used for client visits, team meetings, and preparation of the project deliverables

    Coordinator
    Dr. Aaron Armstrong
  
  • IE 3621 - Ergonomics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the capabilities and limitations of humans and how that relates to product and job design. Includes physical and cognitive aspects of work, as well as micro- and macro- ergonomics concerns. (Students enrolling in this class may not enroll in SS 464 ). (prereq: MA 262 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand how people fit into technological systems
    • Recognize the capabilities and limitations of human perceptual-motor capabilities
    • Recognize the capabilities and limitations of human cognitive functioning and why people make errors
    • Explain the negative effects that poor work system design and poor product design have on humans
    • Recognize the human indicators of fatigue and stress
    • Appreciate the importance of organization and job design factors for performance and satisfaction
    • Define the ethical application of human factors in designing products and processes
    • Recognize ergonomic deficiencies in different environments (i.e., office, manufacturing, and classrooms)
    • Evaluate and generate ergonomic solutions to the aforementioned ergonomic deficiencies
    • Present project information during class presentations as well as in a formal technical report
    • Write reports that describe human performance

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to and history of human factors and ergonomics, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of ergonomics, human factors investigations
    • Human information processing and usability; vision and visual display design; auditory and olfactory display design; touch and tactile displays and controls
    • Basic anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics; physical workload, heat stress, and cold stress
    • Anthropometry and design, work posture and design
    • Manual materials handling and design; repetitive motion injuries and hand tool design; vibration; automation
    • Ergonomics of computer workstations, design of manufacturing environments and maintenance programs
    • Training and cognitive task analysis; task, organization, and job analysis; shift work
    • Accidents, human error, and safety
    • Macro-ergonomics: job and organization design; engineering ethics

    Laboratory Topics
    • The course includes a two-hour lab each week where the students will be engaged in demonstrating their understanding of the lecture topics.
    • Lab time will also be used to work on the course project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Leah Newman
 

Page: 1 <- 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12