Jun 17, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Nursing

  
  • NU 3600C - Nursing Care of the Community

    0 lecture hours 6 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the community as client. The emphasis in this course is the use of the nursing process in partnership with communities for improving health. Students apply systems, change, and epidemiological theories to promote health in selected community settings. Students explore political activism as a role of the professional nurse. Issues relevant to population-based nursing care and societal trends that influence community health are discussed. (prereq: NU 390, NU 3200 or NU 3302, NU 3200L or NU 3302L. NU 3600D  must be prereq or taken concurrently)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Incorporate community and population-based theories and frameworks when caring for the community as the client (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Complete a comprehensive community assessment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze the influence of nurses as advocates for development of health policy (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Explore societal trends and ways communities have historically responded to health issues (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Create and conduct a seminar depicting a selected vulnerable population (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Implement the professional nursing roles of advocate, educator, and change agent when delivering nursing care to a selected community (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Differentiate definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing that reflect the community as client (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Collaborate with community partners to promote the health of a selected community (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Apply epidemiological approaches and best practices for population-based health care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Community assessment data
    • Community theory
    • Epidemiology and application to community Health
    • Nursing process: analysis of community assessment data
    • Population centered nursing population-based nursing practice: The intervention wheel
    • Power, policy and politics
    • Public and community health nursing, health care systems, and community finances
    • Health literacy
    • Global health
    • Program management for community health
    • Legal Issues in public health:
    • Communicable disease management
    • Ethical issues and community health
    • Introduction to vulnerability
    • Genomics in public health nursing
    • Change theory
    • Health for all: healthiest Wisconsin
    • Communities in crisis- disaster care
    • Community violence
    • Environmental health

    Coordinator
    Robin Gates
  
  • NU 3600D - Nursing Care of the Community

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the community as client. The emphasis in this course is the use of the nursing process in partnership with communities for improving health. Students apply systems, change, and epidemiological theories to promote health in selected community settings. Students explore political activism as a role of the professional nurse. Issues relevant to population-based nursing care and societal trends that influence community health are discussed. (prereq: NU 390, NU 3200 or NU 3302, NU 3200L or NU 3302L)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Incorporate community and population-based theories and frameworks when caring for the community as the client (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Complete a comprehensive community assessment (Level 3, Nursing Care)
    • Analyze the influence of nurses as advocates for development of health policy (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Explore societal trends and ways communities have historically responded to health issues (Level 3, Critical Thinking)
    • Display a pattern of personal accountability for one’s own learning while assuming a professional role through acts of integrity and mutual respect (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Create and conduct a seminar depicting a selected vulnerable population (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Implement the professional nursing roles of advocate, educator, and change agent when delivering nursing care to a selected community (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Differentiate definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing that reflect the community as client (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Collaborate with community partners to promote the health of a selected community (Level 3, Collaboration)
    • Apply epidemiological approaches and best practices for population-based health care (Level 3, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Community assessment data
    • Community theory
    • Epidemiology and application to community Health
    • Nursing process: analysis of community assessment data
    • Population centered nursing population-based nursing practice: The intervention wheel
    • Power, policy and politics
    • Public and community health nursing, health care systems, and community finances
    • Health literacy
    • Global health
    • Program management for community health
    • Legal Issues in public health:
    • Communicable disease management
    • Ethical issues and community health
    • Introduction to vulnerability
    • Genomics in public health nursing
    • Change theory
    • Health for all: healthiest Wisconsin
    • Communities in crisis- disaster care
    • Community violence
    • Environmental health

    Coordinator
    Robin Gates
  
  • NU 4600 - Nursing Care of Clients with Mental Health Challenges

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing mental health challenges. Students explore therapeutic use of self. Emphasis is placed on application of therapeutic communication techniques, psychiatric assessment skills, and the nursing process. The impact of the therapeutic environment upon the treatment of specific psychiatric populations across the lifespan are discussed. Students explore legal and ethical issues, mental health research, and current trends in mental health. (prereq: NU 3400 , NU 3600 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Employ a case study approach to construct multidisciplinary treatment plans and apply the nursing process to care for clients experiencing mental health challenges (Level 4, Nursing Care) 
    • Integrate pharmacological principles and clinical standards into the nursing care of clients experiencing mental health challenges (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Incorporate principles of health promotion and health maintenance when using alternative therapies to provide nursing care for clients with mental health challenges (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate self-reflective journaling to increase self-awareness and explore the therapeutic self when applying the nursing process to clients experiencing diverse mental health care challenges (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate legal and ethical issues while exploring stigma reduction and advocacy for clients experiencing mental health challenges (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Retrieve, synthesize, and discuss the evidence from best practices for providing nursing care to clients experiencing mental health challenges (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • The nursing process in psychiatric and mental health nursing              
    • Personality theory- review
    • Recovery theory and application
    • Stress and coping 
    • Anxiety disorders: generalized anxiety disorders, panic disorder 
    • Therapeutic relationship, communication and group therapy
    • Ethical and legal aspects of mental health nursing
    • Psychobiology and psychopharmacology   
    • Schizophrenia -thought disorder
    • Mood disorders: depression and bipolar disorder
    • Personality disorders: borderline personality disorder
    • Substance abuse: detoxification 
    • Military families
    • Eating disorder
    • Child and adolescence
    • Victims of abuse, neglect, rape

    Coordinator
    Catherine Leffler
  
  • NU 4700 - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    3 lecture hours 12 lab hours 7 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq: NU 3400 ) (coreq: NU 4600 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of children with chronic respiratory dysfunction: cystic fibrosis
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and Inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), Arterial/venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Care of children with neuro and neuromuscular dysfunctions (cerebral palsy (CP), spinal cord abnormalities, hydrocephalous)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS.
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: pediatrics, mental health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jessica Barkimer
  
  • NU 4700C - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    0 lecture hours 12 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq: NU 3400 . NU 4700D  must be prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 4600 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of children with chronic respiratory dysfunction: cystic fibrosis
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and Inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), Arterial/venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Care of children with neuro and neuromuscular dysfunctions (cerebral palsy (CP), spinal cord abnormalities, hydrocephalous)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS.
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: pediatrics, mental health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jessica Barkimer
  
  • NU 4700D - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq: NU 3400) (coreq: NU 4600)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of children with chronic respiratory dysfunction: cystic fibrosis
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and Inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), Arterial/venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Care of children with neuro and neuromuscular dysfunctions (cerebral palsy (CP), spinal cord abnormalities, hydrocephalous)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS.
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: pediatrics, mental health

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jessica Barkimer
  
  • NU 4702 - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 9 lab hours 7 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq:  NU 3302 , NU 3302L , NU 390 ) (coreq: NU 3600 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Quality of Life (QOL)
    • Living with chronic illness - sexual health
    • Family response and family caregiving related to chronic illness
    • Hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Care of clients with mobility, motor, and cognitive impairments
    • Rehabilitation nursing
    • Chronic pain across the lifespan
    • Altered growth and development (G&D) - ADHD
    • Care of children with neuro, neuromuscular, muscular, musculoskeletal and articular dysfunctions
    • Discharge planning, case management, home care
    • Care of clients with neurological dysfunctions (TIAs, CVA)
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), arterial/ venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (Adults and Children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients with sensory and perceptual alterations
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with chronic respiratory dysfunction: asthma and cystic fibrosis
    • Adherence
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of clients (children and adults) with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2)
    • Clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: acute care: pediatrics or adult
    Coordinator
    Dr. Jane Paige
  
  • NU 4702C - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    0 lecture hours 9 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq:  NU 3302, NU 3302L, NU 390. NU 4702D  must be prereq or taken concurrently) (coreq: NU 3600)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Quality of Life (QOL)
    • Living with chronic illness - sexual health
    • Family response and family caregiving related to chronic illness
    • Hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Care of clients with mobility, motor, and cognitive impairments
    • Rehabilitation nursing
    • Chronic pain across the lifespan
    • Altered growth and development (G&D) - ADHD
    • Care of children with neuro, neuromuscular, muscular, musculoskeletal and articular dysfunctions
    • Discharge planning, case management, home care
    • Care of clients with neurological dysfunctions (TIAs, CVA)
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), arterial/ venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients with sensory and perceptual alterations
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with chronic respiratory dysfunction: asthma and cystic fibrosis
    • Adherence
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of clients (children and adults) with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2)
    • Clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: acute care: pediatrics or adult

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jane Paige
  
  • NU 4702D - Application of Nursing Care Concepts to Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The emphasis of this course is the application of the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing multiple chronic health concerns. Students explore chronicity from a theoretical basis and apply the nursing process to clients and families across the life span. The impact of developmental issues, the cumulative effects of chronic health challenges, and nursing care of clients and families at end-of-life are explored. The role of the professional nurse as coordinator of care is developed. (prereq: NU 3302, NU 3302L, NU 390) (coreq: NU 3600)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care taking into account developmental and cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate critical thinking and reflective practice when applying the nursing process to care of clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication and health education skills when addressing the cumulative effects on clients with multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate ethical dilemmas faced by clients, their families, and healthcare providers and the effect on one’s philosophy of nursing and future practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Develop and analyze personal and professional goals for current and future nursing practice (Level 3, Professional Role)
    • Select, analyze, and use health information technology and biomedical technologies to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Participate in the role of care coordinator with other healthcare team members to advocate for and improve health care outcomes for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from best practices to ensure the quality and safety of nursing care for clients experiencing multiple chronic health concerns (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Quality of Life (QOL)
    • Living with chronic illness - sexual health
    • Family response and family caregiving related to chronic illness
    • Hardiness, resilience, hopelessness, powerlessness, and chronic sorrow
    • Care of clients with mobility, motor, and cognitive impairments
    • Rehabilitation nursing
    • Chronic pain across the lifespan
    • Altered growth and development (G&D) - ADHD
    • Care of children with neuro, neuromuscular, muscular, musculoskeletal and articular dysfunctions
    • Discharge planning, case management, home care
    • Care of clients with neurological dysfunctions (TIAs, CVA)
    • Care of clients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), arterial/ venous and vaso-occlusive disorders
    • Care of clients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure
    • Care of clients with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) and hepatic dysfunction
    • Care of clients (Adults and Children) with chronic gastro-intestinal (GI) obstructive and inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Care of clients with sensory and perceptual alterations
    • Care of adults and children with chronic renal failure
    • Care of clients with chronic respiratory dysfunction: asthma and cystic fibrosis
    • Adherence
    • Care of adults with chronic lung disorders
    • Care of clients (children and adults) with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2)
    • Clients (adults and children) with chronic endocrine disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal disorders)
    • Care of adults and children with cancer
    • End of life (EOL): care of adults, children, and families
    • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)
    • Care of clients (adults and children) with HIV/AIDS
    • Care of clients with chronic degenerative neurological disorders
    • Components of cardiac function, cardiac pharmacology and application, ECG interpretation basics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: skill review
    • Simulations: care of patient with acute coronary syndrome, care of patient with decompensated heart failure, end of life
    • Clinical focus: acute care: pediatrics or adult

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jane Paige
  
  • NU 4710 - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 12 lab hours 8 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4700 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care incorporating clinical nursing standards to prioritize and respond to the fluctuating health conditions experienced by critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Provide nursing care to critically ill clients in a simulated environment and facilitate class discussion on the trajectory of the critical illness and nursing care needed (Level 4, Nursing Care, Critical Thinking)
    • Integrate pharmacological principles into the care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in analyzing the interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors when providing nursing care to critically ill clients (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication skills with critically ill clients and their families (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Discuss how caring for critically ill clients has affected one’s philosophy of nursing and future professional nursing practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, monitor, and evaluate the accuracy of biomedical technologies and the role of the nurse in ensuring quality and safe delivery of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with the interprofessional health care team to provide coordinated care with the goal of improving health care outcomes for critically ill clients (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve, synthesize, and discuss evidence from best practices that support clinical decisions for care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with increased intracranial pressure/head Injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills:
      • Hemodynamic monitoring
      • ICP monitoring
      • Mechanical ventilation
      • Neonatal assessment
    • Simulations:
      • Infant, GI, growth and development focus
      • Care of a client with shock and hemodynamic instability
      • Care of a client with cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress
      • Care of a client with acute pancreatitis and acute kidney injury
      • Care of a client with myocardial infarction and life-threatening dysrhythmia
    • Lab Simulations:
      • Medication administration check-off
      • Hemodynamics
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4710C - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges

    0 lecture hours 12 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4700. NU 4710D  must be prereq or taken concurrently)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care incorporating clinical nursing standards to prioritize and respond to the fluctuating health conditions experienced by critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Provide nursing care to critically ill clients in a simulated environment and facilitate class discussion on the trajectory of the critical illness and nursing care needed (Level 4, Nursing Care, Critical Thinking)
    • Integrate pharmacological principles into the care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in analyzing the interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors when providing nursing care to critically ill clients (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication skills with critically ill clients and their families (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Discuss how caring for critically ill clients has affected one’s philosophy of nursing and future professional nursing practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, monitor, and evaluate the accuracy of biomedical technologies and the role of the nurse in ensuring quality and safe delivery of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with the interprofessional health care team to provide coordinated care with the goal of improving health care outcomes for critically ill clients (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve, synthesize, and discuss evidence from best practices that support clinical decisions for care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with increased intracranial pressure/head Injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills:
      • Hemodynamic monitoring
      • ICP monitoring
      • Mechanical ventilation
      • Neonatal assessment
    • Simulations:
      • Infant, GI, growth and development focus
      • Care of a client with shock and hemodynamic instability
      • Care of a client with cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress
      • Care of a client with acute pancreatitis and acute kidney injury
      • Care of a client with myocardial infarction and life-threatening dysrhythmia
    • Lab Simulations:
      • Medication administration check-off
      • Hemodynamics
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4710D - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4700)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care incorporating clinical nursing standards to prioritize and respond to the fluctuating health conditions experienced by critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Provide nursing care to critically ill clients in a simulated environment and facilitate class discussion on the trajectory of the critical illness and nursing care needed (Level 4, Nursing Care, Critical Thinking)
    • Integrate pharmacological principles into the care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in analyzing the interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors when providing nursing care to critically ill clients (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication skills with critically ill clients and their families (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Discuss how caring for critically ill clients has affected one’s philosophy of nursing and future professional nursing practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, monitor, and evaluate the accuracy of biomedical technologies and the role of the nurse in ensuring quality and safe delivery of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with the interprofessional health care team to provide coordinated care with the goal of improving health care outcomes for critically ill clients (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve, synthesize, and discuss evidence from best practices that support clinical decisions for care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of Client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with increased intracranial pressure/head Injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills:
      • Hemodynamic monitoring
      • ICP monitoring
      • Mechanical ventilation
      • Neonatal assessment
    • Simulations:
      • Infant, GI, growth and development focus
      • Care of a client with shock and hemodynamic instability
      • Care of a client with cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress
      • Care of a client with acute pancreatitis and acute kidney injury
      • Care of a client with myocardial infarction and life-threatening dysrhythmia
    • Lab Simulations:
      • Medication administration check-off
      • Hemodynamics
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4711 - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges (ASD)

    4 lecture hours 15 lab hours 9 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4702 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care incorporating clinical nursing standards to prioritize and respond to the fluctuating health conditions experienced by critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Provide nursing care to critically ill clients in a simulated environment and facilitate class discussion on the trajectory of the critical illness and nursing care needed (Level 4, Nursing Care, Critical Thinking)
    • Integrate pharmacological principles into the care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in analyzing the interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors when providing nursing care to critically ill clients (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Incorporate effective communication skills with critically ill clients and their families (Level 4, Communication)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Discuss how caring for critically ill clients has affected one’s philosophy of nursing and future professional nursing practice (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, monitor, and evaluate the accuracy of biomedical technologies and the role of the nurse in ensuring quality and safe delivery of nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with the interprofessional health care team to provide coordinated care with the goal of improving health care outcomes for critically ill clients (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve, synthesize, and discuss evidence from best practices that support clinical decisions for care of critically ill clients (Level 4, Evidence-Based Practice)

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with increased intracranial pressure/head Injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills:
      • Hemodynamic monitoring
      • ICP monitoring
      • Mechanical ventilation
      • Neonatal assessment
    • Simulations:
      • Infant, GI, growth and development focus
      • Care of a client with shock and hemodynamic instability
      • Care of a client with cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress
      • Care of a client with acute pancreatitis and acute kidney injury
      • Care of a client with myocardial infarction and life-threatening dysrhythmia
    • Lab Simulations:
      • Medication administration check-off
      • Hemodynamics
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4711C - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges (ASD)

    0 lecture hours 15 lab hours 5 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4702 . NU 4711D  must be prereq or taken concurrently)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide competent, caring, holistic nursing care to critically ill individuals and their families through analytical use of the nursing process (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Employ effective communication skills with client/family and healthcare providers in the critical care environment. (Level 4, Communication)
    • Incorporate principles of health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration to empower clients to achieve optimal health (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate how caring for clients with complex episodic health challenges has impacted his/her philosophy of nursing (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate initiative to seek out new learning opportunities and expand knowledge base establishing a pattern for lifelong learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Integrate advanced technology when providing nursing care for clients in the critical care setting (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with other health care team members to identify nursing care outcomes appropriate to the critical care environment (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Integrate critical thinking skills in interpreting assessment data, interventions and evaluation of nursing care necessary in critical situations/settings (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Synthesize research findings and knowledge from the humanities and sciences into nursing practice within the critical care environment (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with Increased intracranial pressure/head injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/Individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with Immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: hemodynamic monitoring; ICP monitoring; mechanical ventilation; neonatal assessment
    • Simulations: in-class simulations - hemodynamic and shock focus; cardiac and respiratory focus; infant, GI, growth and development focus; multi-system organ failure and family stress/coping focus; termination of life support focus; lab simulations - skills verification; care of patient with hemodynamic and cardiac rhythm instability; code four
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4711D - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges (ASD)

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on care of critically ill clients across the lifespan. The interrelationship between physiological, psychological, and environmental factors impacting critically ill individuals and their families are examined. Using critical thinking skills, students interpret and respond to clients’ changing health patterns in complex technological settings. (prereq: NU 4702 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide competent, caring, holistic nursing care to critically ill individuals and their families through analytical use of the nursing process (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Employ effective communication skills with client/family and healthcare providers in the critical care environment. (Level 4, Communication)
    • Incorporate principles of health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration to empower clients to achieve optimal health (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Integrate how caring for clients with complex episodic health challenges has impacted his/her philosophy of nursing (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate initiative to seek out new learning opportunities and expand knowledge base establishing a pattern for lifelong learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Integrate advanced technology when providing nursing care for clients in the critical care setting (Level 4, Technology)
    • Collaborate with other health care team members to identify nursing care outcomes appropriate to the critical care environment (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Integrate critical thinking skills in interpreting assessment data, interventions and evaluation of nursing care necessary in critical situations/settings (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Synthesize research findings and knowledge from the humanities and sciences into nursing practice within the critical care environment (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to critical care nursing
    • Care of client requiring hemodynamic monitoring
    • Care of the client (adult and child) with shock/sepsis
    • Care of the patient (adult and child) with acute respiratory failure/ARDS
    • Care of the vented client and ventilatory weaning response
    • Care of the adult/child with cardiac alterations: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pulmonary edema, PTCA with thrombolytics
    • Care of patient (adults and child) with Increased intracranial pressure/head injury
    • Care of children with growth and development dysfunctions
    • Care of the clients receiving sedation and anxiolysis
    • Care of patients with acute renal and liver failure, drug overdose
    • Care of patients (adult and child) with life threatening fluid and electrolyte imbalances, DKA/SIADH/DI
    • Care of patients with acute GI bleed/pancreatitis
    • Care of patients’ nutritional needs in critical care
    • Family process/family coping/Individual stress ethical/legal issues in critical care
    • Care of patients with Immunological function/bleeding disorders/blood dyscrasias/DIC
    • Care of the trauma patient
    • Organ donation
    • Care of client with organ transplant

    Laboratory Topics
    • Psychomotor skills: hemodynamic monitoring; ICP monitoring; mechanical ventilation; neonatal assessment
    • Simulations: in-class simulations - hemodynamic and shock focus; cardiac and respiratory focus; infant, GI, growth and development focus; multi-system organ failure and family stress/coping focus; termination of life support focus; lab simulations - skills verification; care of patient with hemodynamic and cardiac rhythm instability; code four
    • Clinical focus: critical care (adult and child/neonatal)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4850 - Senior Nursing Preceptorship (ASD)

    2 lecture hours 15 lab hours 7 credits
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the synthesis of professional nursing concepts. Through clinical immersion in a selected area of practice and under mentorship of a preceptor, students transition into the role of the professional nurse. (prereq: NU 4711 , NU 4600 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care through analytical use of the nursing process during a clinical immersion experience while assuming an increasingly independent role (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Employ reflective narrative analysis and critical thinking skills to synthesize professional nursing concepts and develop personal goals for transitioning into role of professional nurse (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Consistently employ appropriate and effective communication skills with healthcare team members to minimize risk and error during clinical immersion experience (Level 4, Communication)
    • Assume a professional role that is responsive to a changing society while maintaining the client in full partnership in an atmosphere of care and compassion (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Develop one’s professional identity and increase self-confidence and awareness of one’s strengths and weaknesses through active engagement in activities that prepare for transition to the role of a professional nurse (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Select, operate, and evaluate health information technology and biomedical technologies to support safe and quality nursing care (Level 4, Technology)
    • Provide value-based leadership when collaborating with other health care team members to improve outcomes for individuals, families, and the healthcare system during a clinical immersion experience (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Synthesize research findings and knowledge on best practices drawn from professional literature into decisions that ensure the quality and safety of nursing care (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Reflective practice
    • Caring
    • Emotional intelligence
    • Transitioning to practice
    • Graduate nurse interviewing

    Laboratory Topics
    • Clinical focus: clinical immersion

    Coordinator
    April Pellmann
  
  • NU 4860 - Synthesis of Nursing Care

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The focus of this course assists the student in synthesizing the concepts of nursing care for professional nursing practice. Through participation in problem-based learning case scenarios, students solve problems common in healthcare environments. Learning occurs as students engage themselves in finding the solutions and participation in the group process. Peer evaluation and self-directed learning are stressed throughout the course. (prereq: NU 4710  or NU 4711 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss and/or provide safe, effective, compassionate, and holistic nursing care independently to clients in problem-based case and/or simulated situations (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Use critical thinking skills to analyze and solve ill-structured problems commonly encountered in nursing practice exemplified within problem-based case and/or simulated situations (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate reflective thinking and learning though introspection, self-reflection, and self-monitoring of one’s knowledge, skills, and attitudes (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Compare and contrast effective and ineffective communication while analyzing one’s own role with personal examples of effective and ineffective teamwork (Level 4, Communication)
    • Cultivate one’s skill and comfort in the delivery of feedback to team members (Level 4, Communication)
    • Exhibit personal responsibility, professionalism, accountability, and commitment to enhancing team’s performance and cohesiveness (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Demonstrate proficient use of biomedical technology when providing nursing care to clients in problem-based case and/or simulated situations (Level 4, Technology)
    • Demonstrate behaviors that value the ideas and contributions of team members to improve the health outcomes of the clients within problem-based case and/or simulated situations (Level 4, Collaboration)
    • Retrieve and synthesize evidence from diverse sources of professional literature to support decisions that ensure the quality and safety of nursing care provided in problem-based case and/or simulated situations (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Reflection on transition to graduate nurse
    • Teamwork individual and team analysis
    • Problem-based learning simulations
      • Care of the laboring mom
      • Care of multiple clients
      • Care of client with hematologic dysfunction

    Coordinator
    Dr. Kathy Mussatto
  
  • NU 4870 - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice I

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the first in a two-course series that focuses on the student transition into the role of professional nurse following graduation. Emphasis is placed on examining regulatory bodies that govern nursing practice, preparation for the NCLEX-RN licensure exam, and reflection on growth and development as a professional. (prereq: senior clinical placement)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Compare and contrast the development of one’s knowledge, skills, and attitude across time in the nursing program (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Complete a standardized assessment that predicts one’s probability of passing NCLEX-RN licensure exam and interpret results (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Identify deficits and gaps in nursing knowledge and skills and develop a remediation plan to promote academic success (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Reinforce techniques that strengthen test-taking strategies and promote psychological readiness for NCLEX-RN examination (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Describe legal aspects and regulatory bodies that govern professional nursing licensure (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Evaluate options and opportunities for post-graduation educational enhancement (Level 4, Professional Role)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • NCLEX test plan
    • Test taking strategies
    • Licensure
    • National Council of State Boards of Nursing
    • Regulatory Issues
    • Delegation
    • Continuing education
    • Life-long learning
    • Nursing certifications
    • NCLEX test preparations and review

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 4870X - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice I

    2 lecture hours 0 lab hours 2 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an alternate to NU4870 Transitions to Nursing Practice I which is the first in a two-course series that focuses on the student transition into the role of professional nurse following graduation. Emphasis is placed on examining regulatory bodies that govern nursing practice, preparation for the NCLEX-RN licensure exam that is focused and individualized to each student, and reflection on growth and development as a professional. Students who score below the set percentile cut point on a standardized RN Predictor exam are required to take the 2-credit version of this course. (prereq: senior clinical placement)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Compare and contrast the development of one’s knowledge, skills, and attitude across time in the nursing program (Level 4, Nursing Care)
    • Complete a standardized assessment that predicts one’s probability of passing NCLEX-RN licensure exam and interpret results. (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Identify deficits and gaps in nursing knowledge and skills and develop a remediation plan to promote academic success. (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Establish and complete an individualized and directed plan of study to promote success on NCLEX licensure exam. (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Reinforce techniques that strengthen test-taking strategies and promote psychological readiness for NCLEX-RN examination. (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Describe legal aspects and regulatory bodies that govern professional nursing licensure. (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Evaluate options and opportunities for post-graduation educational enhancement. (Level 4, Professional Role)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Licensure issues
    • Regulatory issues
    • State statute
    • Nurse Practice Act
    • National Council of State Boards of Nursing
    • Learning assessment
    • NCLEX test preparation and review

    Coordinator
    Dr. Havilah Normington
  
  • NU 4880 - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice II

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the second in a two-course series that focuses on the student transition into the role of professional nurse following graduation. Emphasis is placed on preparation for the NCLEX-RN licensure exam and reflection on growth and development as a professional. (prereq: NU 4870 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify deficits and gaps in nursing knowledge and skills and develop a remediation plan to promote academic success (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Reinforce techniques that strengthen test-taking strategies and promote psychological readiness for NCLEX-RN examination (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Formulate a comprehensive action plan to promote success on NCLEX-RN licensure exam through self-critique of academic achievement, clinical experiences, faculty feedback, and scores on standardized assessments (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Complete a second standardized assessment that predicts one’s probability of passing NCLEX-RN licensure exam and interpret results (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate a pattern of personal responsibility, professionalism, and accountability for life-long learning (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Evaluate options and opportunities for post-graduation educational enhancement (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Discuss selected current topics and concepts in nursing practice (Level 4, Professional Role)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • NCLEX mastery application
    • Health promotion and maintenance
    • Physiological adaptation
    • Management of care
    • Safety and infection control
    • Hot topics
    • Health care conversations, new graduate expectations/transition to practice
    • NCLEX predictor exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Renee Wenzlaff
  
  • NU 4961 - Nursing Leadership I

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students analyze current concepts related to leadership, teams, quality, safety, and principles of change. Students continue to develop critical thinking and decision-making, utilizing evidence-based practice.   (prereq: senior clinical placement)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply critical thinking skills leadership, teams, quality, safety, and principles of change (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Analyze the role of communication, teamwork, and conflict resolution in effective team functioning (Level 4, Communication)
    • Assume a professional role in partnership with other members of the healthcare team (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Analyze leadership and management concepts that impact effective functioning of nurses in multidisciplinary teams (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Investigate change management principles, theories, and quality improvement processes to address practice issues (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Synthesize evidence from best practice to support change and quality improvement processes in healthcare organizations (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Quality improvement
    • Managing risk
    • Leadership theories
    • Managing your career
    • Client safety
    • Regulatory agencies
    • Nurse/consumer relationships
    • Health care systems
    • Organizational structure
    • Organizational culture
    • Clinical micro systems
    • Building reams
    • Just culture
    • Principles of change

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Klug
  
  • NU 4971 - Nursing Leadership II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students reflect on personal leadership skills and role development while preparing for transition to professional practice. Students investigate and develop solutions to improve client, organizational, and system outcomes. (prereq: NU 4961 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply critical thinking skills to personal leadership skills and role development (Level 4, Critical Thinking)
    • Design effective strategies for communicating with stakeholders and other members of the health care system (Level 4 communication)
    • Assume a professional role in partnership with other members of the healthcare team that is responsive to society and a changing healthcare environment (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Analyze how personal leadership styles and skills impact the effectiveness of roles, relationships and teamwork (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Apply change management principles, theories, and appropriate quality improvement processes to address practice issues (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Deliberate the impact of power, persuasion, and ethical issues on public policy and legal cases in healthcare (Level 4, Professional Role)
    • Critique evidence from best practices to support quality and safety initiatives in healthcare systems (Level 4, Evidence-based Practice)

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Power, politics and influence
    • Workforce engagement
    • Healthy work environments
    • Scope of practice 
    • Fiscal responsibility
    • Staffing and acuity
    • Health care policy
    • Legal and ethical Issues 
    • Conflict management
    • Leadership skills

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Klug

Orientation

  
  • OR 402 - Professional Guidance

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    The objective of this course is to assist students in the transition from college life to professional life. The course provides students with techniques for and experiences in conducting a successful job search, preparing letters of application and resumes, and preparing for job interviews. It also examines the concepts of success, lifelong learning, and professional responsibilities. (prereq: sophomore standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know the meaning of success and how they might achieve it
    • Articulate their job qualifications and personal strengths to a potential employer
    • Know how to network and conduct an effective job search
    • Write an effective letter of application and resume
    • Interview effectively
    • Know the importance of professional certification and how to apply for and prepare for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam
    • Know how to analyze their need for graduate school, know what exams are required for entrance into various graduate programs, and know how to apply for graduate school
    • Know how to use the MSOE Career Services office
    • Understand the importance of continually setting goals in order to ensure their continued professional growth and success and know how to develop a career plan
    • Know what industry expects of them as responsible, ethical professionals
    • Understand the importance of life-long learning

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Self-assessment and the meaning of success (1 class)
    • Developing a successful job search and exploring the job market (1 class)
    • Placement Office procedures (1 class)
    • Letters of application and resumes (1 class)
    • Interviewing skills (1 class)
    • Alums share professional experiences and insights (1 class)
    • Professional licensing procedures and exams (1 class)
    • Graduate school (1 class)
    • Professional ethics and responsibilities (1 class)
    • Goal planning for continued success (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Jennifer Abing
  
  • OR 0911 - Foundations of Student Success

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to support students who are struggling academically, indicated by either a term, cumulative, or major GPA that falls below a 2.0.  In this course, students develop skills such as time management, study strategies, goal setting, motivation, and others to become independent learners and successful MSOE students. Through discussion, weekly tutoring, regular meetings with their instructor, and other activities, students will discover how to take responsibility for their own learning. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop and apply the learning strategies necessary for academic success
    • View learning as a process that can be planned and monitored
    • Learn to develop accountability to self and others for their learning process
    • Recognize the academic and non-academic reasons that impede their progress
    • Know what supports are available to aid in their academic success

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Obstacles to academic success
    • Time management, developing a study plan, and interpreting course syllabi & expectations
    • Internal behaviors impacting student success
    • External factors impacting student success
    • Identifying, implementing and adapting success strategies
    • Calculating GPA and assessing academic progress
    • Test preparation
    • Making an academic success plan

    Coordinator
    Cassie Vosters
  
  • OR 0912 - Student Support & Academic Intervention

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to support students who are struggling academically, indicated by either a term, cumulative, or major GPA that falls below a 2.0.  Through regular meetings with the instructor, students will define their academic difficulties and take ownership of their learning.  Using SMART goal setting, students will identify and implement the necessary strategies to overcome the behaviors and obstacles that are prohibiting academic success. Course Coordinator approval necessary for course registration.  (prereq: successful completion of OR 0911  and instructor approval)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify and implement strategies to overcome obstacles that impede student success
    • Develop and apply the learning strategies necessary for academic success
    • Maintain an honest relationship with self and others
    • Proactively pursue supports available to aid in overall student well-being

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Cassandra Vosters
  
  • OR 0913 - Perspective, Potential, & Purpose

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits


    Course Description
    This course will explore MSOE’s Eight Dimensions of Wellness, with an emphasis on intellectual, occupational, social, and cultural awareness in relation to personal identity and student success.  Through intentional planning and engagement, the course will help students increase motivation towards graduation. Face-to-face lectures introduce components of the dimensions of wellness with further discussion occurring in group and/or online. Students will then build personal interests, skills, and values by establishing connections through out-of-class activities.

    With a comprehensive understanding of their interests, skills, and values, class participants will increase motivation to accomplish goals that support success at MSOE.  By exploring MSOE’s Eight Dimensions of Wellness, class participants will lead a well-balanced, productive life, and receive greater satisfaction in their experiences. This will allow them to better engage with, and fully realize, the MSOE Mindset in the classroom and upon graduation. (prereq: OR 0911  or instructor approval) 


    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define personal identity through the Eight Dimensions of Wellness, with an emphasis on intellectual, occupational, social, and cultural dimensions
    • Discover various dimensions of self from an internal and external lens
    • Create and follow through with a plan that gives purpose and direction towards accomplishing their personal and academic goals
    • Research and explore interests, skills, and values to influence internal and external motivation
    • Connect with on and off-campus resources to further explore personal interests, skills, and values
    • Implement strategies for reflection to increase self-awareness

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Identify the 3 components of the course [develop, reflect, connect] and the work that will be graded
    • Articulate the Eight Dimensions of Wellness and how they will further explore them throughout the course.

    Academic Self

    • Examine their intellectual curiosity and assess their personal willingness to seek out and critically examine new information, and their openness to new ideas (I, So)
    • Formulate an academic planning system, demonstrating prioritization, time management, and study skills (I, P)
    • Establish relationships to demonstrate accountability and responsibility towards goals established in the course (So, I, Em)

    Authentic Self

    • Define their core value system (Sp, C, En, Em)
    • Discuss the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and determine how to develop and utilize them (I, Em, P, So, O, En, C, Sp)
    • Differentiate between a fixed and growth mindset in relation to developing interests and improving skills (Em, So, O)

    Career Self

    • Assess and articulate their strengths, skills, and interests (I, O)
    • Discover, through individual research and exploration, majors, extracurricular activities, and career opportunities
    • Engage with structured involvement opportunities related to their interests, skills and values (O, So, En, C)

    Career Lens

    • Students will identify personal and environmental characteristics that promote satisfying career decisions (O, En, So, C)
    • Articulate how their interests, skills and strengths support long-term career goals (I, O, En, C)

    Community Lens

    • Develop an understanding of their personal biases (Sp, C)
    • Students will establish awareness of similarities vs. differences and challenges vs. achievements within their local community through structured involvement opportunities (Sp, So, C, En)
    • Students will reflect on potential areas of value-creation within their community (So, Sp, C, En)
    • Examine their personal growth throughout the term and illustrate their findings in a final project and presentation

     


    Coordinator
    Cassie Vosters

  
  • OR 0914 - Mind, Mood, & Movement

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 1 credits


    Course Description
    This course will explore MSOE’s Eight Dimensions of Wellness-with an emphasis on spiritual, emotional, and physical dimensions-in relation to personal well-being and student success.  The course will help establish balance between personal and academic lives through intentional planning and engagement.  Face-to-face lectures introduce components of the dimensions of wellness with further discussion occurring in group and/or online. Out-of-class activities are used to help students establish goals to explore personal wellness through mind, mood, movement.

    With a comprehensive understanding of their spiritual, emotional, and physical well-being, class participants will be more equipped to accomplish goals that support success at MSOE.  By exploring MSOE’s Eight Dimensions of Wellness, class participants will lead a well-balanced, productive life, and receive greater satisfaction in their experiences. This will allow them to better engage with, and fully realize, the MSOE Mindset, in the classroom and upon graduation. (prereq: OR 0911  or instructor approval)


    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define personal health and wellness through the Eight Dimensions of Wellness, with an emphasis on the spiritual, emotional, and physical dimensions
    • Identify components of a healthy lifestyle
    • Create and follow-through with a plan that gives purpose and direction towards accomplishing their personal and academic goals
    • Research and explore how mind, mood, and movement can influence internal and external motivation
    • Understand internal and external factors that impact healthy lifestyle choices
    • Connect with on- and off-campus resources to further explore personal health and wellness

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Students will be able to identify the 3 components of the course [develop, reflect, connect] and the work that will be graded
    • Students will be able to articulate the Eight Dimensions of Wellness and how they will further explore them throughout the course
    • Students will develop goals for the course based on their personal challenges

    Health and Wellness Basics

    • Students will examine the short and long-term benefits and side effects connected to sleep, nutrition, and physical activity (P, Em, En, So, Sp, C)
    • Students will evaluate their current sleeping, eating, and physical fitness patterns in comparison to the recommended guidelines (I, P, Em, En, So, Sp, C)
    • Students will implement and monitor an improvement plan based on goals established in the course (I, P, Em, So, Sp, En)

    Lifestyle Choices and Behavior Change

    • Students will examine lifestyle choices that prevent them from maintaining a healthy life (P, Em, En, So, Sp, C)
    • Students will identify the stages of change and use them to modify their plan towards achieving their goal  (I, P, Em, En, So, Sp, C)
    • Students will be able to rationalize how their goals can be maintained in new or changing environments (I, P, Em, So, Sp, En, O)

    Spiritual and Emotional Intelligence

    • Students will be able to articulate the negative health outcomes of unaddressed stress (Em, Sp, So)
    • Students will be able to identify their sources and triggers of stress (I, En, So, C)
    • Students will recognize the benefits of incorporating mindfulness into their lives (I, Em, Sp, So)
    • Students will discover and implement stress management strategies through engagement with on- or off-campus resources (I, P, Em, So, Sp)

    Coordinator
    Cassie Vosters

  
  • OR 1910 - Strategies for International Student Success

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to help international undergraduate students develop the necessary skills to become independent learners and successful MSOE students. The course will present a variety of academic study skills so students are better prepared to be successful in their classes. It will also focus on acculturation: what it takes to be successful in an American university and comfortable living in a new culture. Through class discussion and weekly activities, students will learn to feel at home in a new academic and social environment. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop and apply the learning strategies necessary for their academic success
    • View learning as a process that can be planned and monitored
    • Know what supports are available to aid in their academic success
    • Understand how to effectively interact with their peers and professors
    • Better understand the existence and impact of cultural differences in an out of the classroom
    • Evaluate and make decisions that will positively impact their studies at MSOE
    • Plan for long term success, in college and in the workforce
    • Recognize and avoid all forms of academic dishonesty

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katie Toske
  
  • OR 1960 - Carter Academy Seminar

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide Carter Academy Scholars the opportunity to continue to develop the necessary skills needed for success at MSOE. It provides face-to-face engagement with support staff and faculty to aid students in developing necessary competencies via discussion, presentations, and skills exercises. It will help student understand how to maximize their own learning in a university setting.  (prereq: enrollment in the Carter Academy Program) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Examine and develop the learning strategies necessary for success as an engineering student
    • Explain how an inclusive and supportive community can benefit and enhance their learning experience
    • Identify non-academic skills needed for success in their academic program
    • Take part in developing accountability to self and others for their learning process
    • Utilize resources that are available to aid in their academic success
    • Research and explore their program track and career opportunities available to them
    • Stimulate the understanding and development of the MSOE and growth mindset models

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Identify the main course objectives and how they can impact their success at MSOE
    • Identify a success partner to increase accountability and engagement.
    • Demonstrate and refine their understanding of academic related skills, such as time management, prioritization, goal setting and motivation
    • Develop relationships with faculty and staff to help create an inclusive and supportive community
    • Examine their own interests and skills and identify how their programs be influenced by them
    • Learn how the development of the MSOE Mindset and growth mindset can impact their learning experience
    • Engage actively with university resources to continue the development of the MSOE Mindset
    • Connect with resources offered by the university which indirectly impact their academics and program such as Career Services, Financial Aid, and the Wellness Center
    • Present to the class on their assigned group topics
    • Write a final reflection and participate in a small group discussion regarding their own development throughout their first two terms at MSOE

    Coordinator
    Dan Meiser

Physics

  
  • PH 113 - College Physics I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This is an introductory presentation of the fundamental concepts and principles of mechanics and heat. Vectors, motion with constant acceleration, Newton’s Laws, work, energy and momentum are discussed in the mechanics portion of the course. Temperature, thermal expansion, heat capacity and heat transfer mechanisms are discussed in the heat portion. The associated laboratory correlates theory with experimental results and gives students direct experience with some of the concepts presented in the lectures. The laboratory also provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with laboratory instruments, and techniques, and report writing. This course replaces PT 110. Not for credit for students who have credit for PH 130 . Designated as laptop course. (prereq: MA 127 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Distinguish between scalar and vector quantities and to work problems involving vector addition and subtraction in both polar and rectangular form
    • Understand kinematics graphs and be able to use them to solve problems
    • Apply the laws of kinematics to solve both one-and two-dimensional problems involving motion under constant acceleration
    • Solve a problem requiring transforming kinematical quantities from one reference frame to a second, moving frame
    • Use free body diagrams to solve dynamics problems
    • Understand Newton’s Laws of Motion and Newton’s Law of Gravitation and be able to work problems with them involving linear and circular motion
    • Understand the concepts of work, energy, and power and be able to solve problems involving them
    • Understand the conservation of mechanical energy and be able to work problems and also be able to work problems involving energy and non-conservative forces
    • Understand the concepts of impulse and momentum and be able to work problems involving it
    • Understand the conservation of momentum and be able to work problems involving both it and the conservation of energy
    • Understand the concept of center-of-mass and be able to work problems involving it
    • Understand the concepts of heat, temperature and thermal expansion and be able to work problems involving them
    • Understand the concepts of calorimetry and to be able to work problems involving them with or without phase changes
    • Understand the three methods of heat transfer and be able to work problems involving them

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • PH 090 or one year of high school physics

    Course Topics
    • Mechanics - 8 weeks. (24 classes)
    • Heat - 2 weeks (6 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • An accelerating car
    • An object in free fall
    • Uncertainties in measurements
    • Projectile motion
    • Propagation of uncertainties
    • Newton’s Second Law
    • Conservation of mechanical energy
    • Impulse and change in momentum
    • Momentum and energy in collisions
    • Specific and latent heats of water

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 123 - College Physics II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The first section of this course covers the principles of electricity and magnetism. Specific topics covered include Coulomb’s law, electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, simple DC circuits and Ohm’s law, forces on charged particles in magnetic fields, and magnetic fields due to electric currents. The last section of this course covers the principles of geometric and physical optics. The laws of reflection and refraction are discussed, and these laws are used to study the ways in which mirrors and lenses can be used to form images. Interference is discussed and applied to double slits and thin films. The associated laboratory is designed to give students direct experience with the concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory also serves to familiarize students with laboratory techniques and equipment. This course replaces PT 220. Not for credit for students who have credit for PH 2020 or PH 2021  or PT 220. Designated as a laptop course. (prereq: PH 113 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concepts of charging by conduction and by induction
    • Understand the concepts of electric force, electric field, and electric potential and be able to work problems involving them
    • Sketch electric fields and equipotential lines
    • Understand and be able to work problems involving the concepts of capacitance, dielectrics, dielectric strength and the energy stored in a capacitor
    • Understand the concepts of resistance and resistivity, be able to identify the factors which contribute to these quantities and be able to work problems involving them
    • Describe the motion of charges in a wire
    • Understand Ohm’s Law and power transfer in electric circuits and be able to work problems involving them
    • Understand Kirchoff’s laws and be able to work problems involving capacitors and resistors in series or parallel and involving circuits that may have multiple batteries in them
    • Sketch and calculate the magnetic field for simple situations such as loops, wires, and solenoids
    • Draw and calculate the magnetic force on a wire, moving charge, or a current carrying wire
    • Understand the Hall Effect and the operation of simple motors
    • Understand the nature of mechanical and electromagnetic waves (light)
    • Understand the concepts of refraction and reflection and be able to apply them both by drawing ray diagrams and by working problems involving single reflecting or refracting surfaces, lenses, mirrors, and optical fibers
    • Understand double slit interference and thin film interference and be able to work problems involving them

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • PH 113 , College Physics I (Mechanics and Heat)

    Course Topics
    • Electricity and magnetism - 7 weeks (21 classes)
    • Basic optics and light - 3 weeks (9 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • The digital multimeter
    • Introduction to the use of the oscilloscope
    • Electrostatic acceleration and deflection of electrons
    • Equipotential surfaces and electric fields
    • Parallel plate capacitors
    • Simple RC circuits and the RC time constant
    • Magnetic deflection of electrons
    • The current balance
    • Converging mirrors and lenses
    • Interference and diffraction of light
    • Young’s double slit experiment
    • Diffraction of light

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 130 - Survey of Physics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is intended to provide students in nontechnical fields with the fundamentals of physics. Topics include mechanics, energy, fluids, thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics. Laboratory experiments complement the lecture material and provide work on report writing skills. Not for credit for students who have credit in PH 2011 , PH 2011A , PH 2010, PH 2010A, PH 110, PH 113  or PT 110. (prereq: two years of high school mathematics) (coreq: MA 127 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Define and use displacement, velocity, and acceleration in one dimension as well as understand the graphical relationship between them
    • List, explain, and use Newton’s three laws in one dimension
    • Define work, power, kinetic energy, and potential energy and apply them to conservation of energy
    • Know the factors that are essential to calculate the heat necessary to change the temperature or state of a material
    • State and discuss the three heat transfer mechanisms
    • State and use Archimedes’ Principle, Pascal’s Principle and Bernouilli’s Principle
    • State and use Coulomb’s Law and Ohm’s Law
    • State and use the law of reflection and refraction as well as use the object-image formula for thin lenses and mirrors
    • Know the basic parts of the eye and the function of each
    • Explain radioactivity, half life, and state the properties of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation
    • Use graphical analysis to interpret data
    • Design, conduct and analyze an experiment to determine an unknown temperature with limited means

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • One-dimensional kinematics (4 classes)
    • One-dimensional mechanics (4 classes)
    • Energy (3 classes)
    • Thermodynamics (3 classes)
    • Fluid dynamics (2 classes)
    • Coulomb’s Law and simple circuits (5 classes)
    • Optics (6 classes)
    • Modern physics (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • One-dimensional motion
    • Newton’s Second Law
    • Conservation of mechanical energy
    • Oscillatory motion
    • Specific heat and heat of fusion
    • Problem solving, measuring temperature with limited means
    • Resistors and Ohm’s Law
    • Mirrors or lenses
    • Grating spectrometer
    • Half-life determination

    Coordinator
    Ruth Schwartz
  
  • PH 199 - Project in Physics

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    Students are given the opportunity to pursue an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled course work. This may take the form of individual or small group studies, literature surveys, and laboratory or research projects. Weekly meetings with the course adviser are required. A final report to be filed in the Physics and Chemistry Department may also be required. This course is offered to students with freshman or sophomore standing and does not meet the requirements for the Minor in Physics. Credit in this course will be determined after consultation with the instructor. Students with junior or senior standing should request PH 499 . (prereq: consent of the course coordinator and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have had the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Have broadened his/her specific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Laboratory Topics
    • Depends on topic selected.

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • PH 320 - Lasers and Applications

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course prepares students for understanding the practical applications of lasers in industry. The course begins with a brief review of the principles of optics and a discussion of atomic structure and energy levels as related to lasers. Discussions of low-power lasers include their application to telecommunications, reading, writing, alignment and holography. High-power laser applications including cutting, welding, drilling, and marking are discussed. Laboratory sessions give students hands-on experience in spectroscopy, laser safety, laser beam properties and laser applications. (prereq: PH 123  or PH 2021 MA 137 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Discuss concepts of geometrical optics, including reflection, refraction, total internal reflection, and fiber optics
    • Discuss concepts of wave optics, including polarization, coherence, interference, and diffraction
    • Discuss the differences between lasers and conventional light sources
    • Sketch an energy level diagram for the hydrogen atom and describe the processes of spontaneous emission, stimulated emission, and stimulated absorption
    • Explain different possible electron excitation and de-excitation mechanisms in atoms
    • Calculate the energy, frequency, and wavelength of the photon emitted or absorbed in a radiative transition from the energy level diagram
    • List the requirements for laser action and describe briefly how a laser works
    • Discuss attainment of a population inversion by pumping for both three and four level laser systems
    • Define “Q-switching” and describe one method used to Q-switch a laser
    • Discuss some applications for a diode laser, HeNe laser, carbon dioxide laser, Nd:YkAG laser
    • Compare and contrast the operation of a carbon dioxide laser with a HeNe laser. List some industrial applications of a carbon dioxide laser
    • Compare and contrast the operation of a carbon dioxide laser with a Nd:YAG laser
    • Understand the basics of laser safety and be able to safely use medium power class IIIb lasers in a laboratory setting
    • Measure and understand the meaning of absorption spectra of various materials and emission spectra of various light sources

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Two college-level physics courses, at least one including some optics
    • Two quarters of calculus

    Course Topics
    • Principles of geometrical and wave optics (review) (2 classes)
    • Atomic theory (2 classes)
    • Laser theory (3 classes)
    • Laser characteristics (3 classes)
    • Laser accessories (1 class)
    • Gas, solid-state, and semi-conductor lasers (4 classes)
    • Low power laser applications (2 classes)
    • High power laser applications (2 classes)
    • Laser safety (1 class)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Laser safety, irradiance and power measurements
    • Interference and diffraction
    • Polarization
    • Emission spectra
    • Gaussian laser beams
    • Absorption spectra and coefficients
    • Characteristics of laser diodes
    • Coherence length and mode spacing of HeNe lasers

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jeffrey Korn
  
  • PH 322 - Intro-Optics and Photonics

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of optics and photonics. Topics covered include the properties and operating principles of sources and detectors of light, the principles of reflection, refraction, image formation, image aberrations, absorption, scattering, fiber optic communications, polarization, diffraction, interference, lasers, and holography. Applications of the principles of optics and photonics are emphasized with examples that range from optics in nature to optics and photonics in science and engineering. In the associated laboratory section, students have opportunities to gain hands-on experience in the MSOE Applied Optics Laboratory and the Photonics and Sensors Laboratory. (prereq: PH 123 , PH 2020 or PH 2021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Characterize the properties of light from an electromagnetic wave and from a photon point of view
    • Understand the basic operating principles of a wide variety of sources and detectors of light and use information about the characteristics of those sources and detectors to make recommendations for specific applications
    • Use the laws of reflection and refraction to predict the paths taken by the reflected and transmitted rays when a light ray is incident on the boundary between two different transparent regions, and use Fresnel’s equation to predict the details of how the energy in the incident ray is divided into the energies of the reflected and transmitted rays
    • Use the laws of reflection and refraction to explain the principles of retro-reflecting mirror assemblies, prisms, and the transmission of light using optical fibers
    • Use elementary geometrical optics to design lens and mirror systems to accomplish the formation of real and virtual images of objects and to predict the location, orientation and brightness of the images
    • Explain the operation of and be able to design simple optical instruments such as rangefinders, cameras, microscopes, and telescopes using principles that minimize the effects of spherical and chromatic aberration
    • Explain how signal degradation occurs in optical fibers due to attenuation of light and because of modal, material, and waveguide dispersion of light
    • Distinguish between Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction of light and explain how interference and diffraction can be used to design anti-reflecting films, diffraction gratings and optical instruments such as interferometers
    • Explain the different ways to polarize light, the principles of quarter-wave plates and half-wave plates, and the principles of operation and applications of polarized light such as is used for liquid crystal displays
    • Understand the operation and properties of gas lasers and semiconductor p-n junction lasers
    • Show how to use the principles of holography to construct a hologram and to use the double-exposure technique and the continuous-exposure or real-time technique to accomplish holographic testing for stresses and strains in materials
    • Explain the principles of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectroscopy, and be able to show how those spectroscopic techniques can be used to study the properties of atoms, molecules, and the surfaces of materials
    • Design zone plates for applications at different wavelength of electro-magnetic radiation
    • Use the principles of reflection, refraction, and interference to explain the many different patterns of light and color that appear in the sky due to interaction of rays of sunlight with raindrops and airborne ice crystals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Geometrical optics (9 classes)
    • Physical optics (12 classes)
    • Quantum optics and lasers (9 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. A. James Mallmann
  
  • PH 324 - Fiber Optics/Fiber Optic Sensors

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a theoretical and experimental foundation of fiber optics, fiber optic communication, optical sources, detectors and fiber optic sensors. Topics include electromagnetic propagation, reflection and refraction, optical modes, dispersion, scattering, carrier loss, optical time-domain reflectometry, light-emitting and laser diodes, photonic crystals and band-gap fibers. Techniques and applications for fiber optic communication systems will be studied, including bit rate and bandwidth, wavelength-division multiplexing, filters, optical switching and coupling, and optical amplifiers. (prereq: PH 123  or PH 2021  (or PH 2020) and PH 2031  (or PH 2030))
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Basic properties of an electromagnetic wave in vacuum and in a dielectric
    • Boundary conditions for light within a cylindrical fiber
    • Differentiate between guided, leaky, and radiation modes
    • Chromatic and material dispersion, and pulse broadening and distortion
    • Absorption, reflection, scattering, and bending losses along a fiber
    • Environmental affects on propagation in a fiber and fiber-optic sensors
    • Optical wavelength windows in silica fiber
    • Bit rate and bandwidth
    • Usage of single mode versus multimode fiber
    • Basic properties and uses of optical sources and receivers
    • Fiber connection, coupling, optical amplifiers and optical switching
    • Time-division multiplexing, wavelength-division multiplexing, and demultiplexing
    • Newer technologies including erbium-doped fiber amplifiers and band-gap fibers
    • Basics of fiber-optic networks
    • General status of the fiber-optic industry and market

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Olsson
  
  • PH 325 - Acoustics & Illumination

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The first part of this course covers the science of generation, propagation and reception of sound. Included are vibration of strings and membranes, acoustic radiation, transmission, diffraction and absorption coefficients, as well as room acoustics and the psychological effects of sound, music and noise. The second part of this course acquaints students with the basic physics of light and illumination. Included are lectures on photometry and photometric units, interaction of visible light and matter, color and lighting calculations for room interiors. (prereq: PH 2021  or PH 2031 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Find the period, frequency and amplitude of the simple harmonic motion executed by a given mass attached to a given spring
    • Find the sum of two simple harmonic motions
    • Calculate the frequency of standing waves in an air column
    • Determine the speed of sound in air from the temperature
    • Convert from decibels to watts per square meter and vice versa
    • Predict the reverberation time in a room whose materials and dimensions are given
    • Define photometric terms such as lumen, foot-candle, lambert, etc.
    • Calculate the illuminance on a surface due to a given point source
    • Calculate the number of light fixtures of a given type that are required to produce a given foot-candle level in a room
    • Predict the resultant color obtained by mixing two colors of light
    • Determine the interference pattern produced by the superposition of sound or light waves
    • Predict the intensity of light that has passed through two or more polarizing filters

    Course Topics
    • Vibrations (3 classes)
    • Wave motion (3 classes)
    • Sound (3 classes)
    • Hearing (2 classes)
    • Noise (3 classes)
    • Music (1 class)
    • Room acoustics (3 classes)
    • Light units (2 classes)
    • Interior and exterior lighting (3 classes)
    • Color, spectra (2 classes)
    • Energy (2 classes)
    • Review (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 341 - Intro-Astronomy/Astrophysics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This introductory survey covers topics that range from a discussion of the observations and experiments of the earliest astronomers to a consideration of the most recent developments involving black holes, the detection of gravitational waves, and the search for extrasolar planets. Broad topic areas include the Earth, the solar system, lives of stars, and galaxies. Some time is spent discussing different types of telescopes, including spaced-based telescopes. A Maksutov-Cassegrain 5-inch reflecting telescope is available for student use off campus. (prereq: PH 123 , PH 130 , PH 2020 or PH 2021 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Distinguish between scientific models and reality. Discuss the scientific method
    • Discuss the history of astronomy and astronomical observations
    • Describe the universe in general terms, its constituents, and the Earth’s position in the universe.
    • Distinguish between astronomy and astrology
    • Describe how the laws of Newtonian mechanics lead to an understanding of Kepler’s laws of planetary motion
    • Discuss the mechanics of orbits and explain “weight-lessness”
    • Understand the use of celestial coordinates and terminology
    • Explain the origin of the Earth’s seasons, lunar phases and eclipses of the sun and moon
    • Describe the electromagnetic spectrum and the inverse-square law of propagation of electromagnetic energy
    • Explain the importance of spectroscopy in astronomy, as used in temperature determination and spectral classification, composition, and relative velocity of stars
    • Discuss the Planck Radiation Law, and basic atomic theory as it relates to emission and absorption spectra
    • Describe various forms of astronomical instrumentation, including optical and radio telescopes, photometric devices, and ultraviolet, x-ray, and gamma ray telescopes
    • Explain the choices of the locations of the orbiting Hubble and James Webb space telescopes
    • Describe the solar system, its constituents, and size in general terms and to discuss the properties of the terrestrial and Jovian planets
    • Calculate the average temperature of the surfaces of the planets, and to know the current facts about climate change and global warming
    • Describe the life cycle of stars and to explain how the details of a star’s life cycle depends on its mass
    • Discuss meteors, asteroids, and comets in general terms
    • Discuss the history and future of space exploration
    • Explain how the apparent and absolute magnitudes of stars are determined
    • Explain how astronomical distances are determined
    • Understand how the energy radiated by the sun is produced and to calculate the sun’s probable lifetime
    • Explain how the H-R diagram and computer methods lead to an understanding of the structure and evolution of stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, black holes, and supernovae
    • Describe the Milky Way Galaxy, its shape, size, and structure
    • Discuss galaxies, galactic distances and galactic types, including quasars
    • Discuss the structure of the universe, the Hubble Law, and the Big Bang cosmological model
    • Understand the different methods used to search for extrasolar planets including the Kepler Mission

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Astronomy (6 classes)
    • Observational astronomy (6 classes)
    • Planetary and stellar motions (6 classes)
    • Interstellar material (3 classes)
    • Star types, etc. (3 classes)
    • Stellar evolution (2 classes)
    • Galaxies and quasars (2 classes)
    • Cosmology (2 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. A. James Mallmann
  
  • PH 342 - Relativity and Cosmology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a survey of topics related to relativity and cosmology: the 1905 Special Theory of Relativity, the 1916 General Theory of Relativity, and Big Bang Cosmology. Lectures will highlight the concepts and present some detailed examples. Discussions will seek to reconcile the paradoxes and conundrums that befuddle these topics. Homework involves reading an inexpensive paperback aimed at understanding the essence of these concepts, and working a few basic problems. (prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the conventional modern views of relativity and cosmology
    • Understand alternative views about relativity and cosmology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic algebra: The mathematics required within this survey of topics involves only basic algebra with the expectation that most MSOE students will not be challenged by the mathematics, but will be challenged by the conceptual essence of the survey topics themselves

    Course Topics
    • Topics include geometry (Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, curved space, Minkowski space, geodesics)
    • Relativity (space, time, E=mc2, mass, energy, neutrinos)
    • The fourth dimension (time dilation, black holes, the Big Bang, causality and time travel)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 352 - Quantum Physics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is an elective course for students who want to further their knowledge of quantum physics and its applications. Topics may vary from offering to offering, dependent on student interest, and may include atomic, molecular, and solid state solutions to the non-relativistic Schrodinger equation, discussions of macroscopic quantum phenomena, including superfluidity, superconductivity, and magnetism, as well as an overview of relativistic quantum mechanics, Feynman diagrams, elementary particles and a review of the Standard Model. (prereq: PH 2030 or PH 2031  or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Solve the Schrodinger equation for piece-wise constant potentials in one dimension
    • Understand the importance of spin and angular momentum in determining the quantum states of atoms and molecules
    • Use boson and fermion statistics to determine the properties of systems that manifest quantum behavior on a macroscopic scale
    • Draw Feynman diagrams showing the fundamental interactions between elementary particles
    • Have gained a rudimentary understanding of the Standard Model of fundamental particles and interactions

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Elementary understanding of quantum phenomena
    • Basic differential equations

    Course Topics
    • Review of the historical background of quantum mechanics
    • 1-Dimensional solutions to the Schrodinger equation
    • Expectation values and operators
    • Atomic physics
    • Classical and quantum statistics. Bosons and fermions
    • Applications of quantum statistics to macroscopic quantum phenomena
    • Elementary particles, fundamental forces and the Standard Model
    • Beyond the Standard Model

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Olsson
  
  • PH 354 - Nuclear Power, Applications and Safety

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject serves as an introduction to the physics of the use of nuclear power. It examines the nature of radioactivity and protection from it. It deals with the uses of radioactive isotopes in medicine and science. It examines the release, control and utilization of energy from fission and fusion reactions. (prereq: consent of Instructor or PH 2030 or PH 2031 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand nuclear reactions and radiations; binding energy, nuclear stability, neutron reactions, radioactive isotopes
    • Explain interaction of radiation with matter
    • Understand the process of nuclear fission, fission energy, and critical mass
    • Understand the interaction of neutrons with matter and the cross-sections for neutron reactions
    • Understand the process of slowing down of neutrons in a non-multiplying medium
    • Understand the criticality condition for a steady state reactor and multiplication factors
    • State the basic differences between a homogeneous reactor and a heterogeneous reactor
    • Understand the different methods of control of a Nuclear reactor
    • Discuss the two different types of neutrons in a reactor; the prompt neutrons and the delayed neutrons. Discuss the effect of delayed neutrons in a reactor
    • Define reactivity and the units of reactivity. Also, explain the natural reactivity changes and the factors affecting reactivity
    • Explain temperature effects on reactivity and define the temperature coefficient of reactivity
    • Understand the general feature of nuclear reactors and discuss the different types of reactors
    • Compare and contrast between the process of fission and fusion
    • Understand the biological effects of radiation
    • Understand radioactive dating and the information available from isotopes
    • Understand medical treatment and other useful radiation effects
    • Discuss radiation protection

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Nuclear energy - reactions - radiation (6 classes)
    • Reactor theory and operation (6 classes)
    • Radiation detectors and instruments (3 classes)
    • Thermodynamics of nuclear power plants (3 classes)
    • Radioactive half lives and radioactive shielding (3 classes)
    • Biological effect of radiation (3 classes)
    • Useful radiation effects (3 classes)
    • Radioactive waste disposal (3 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 361 - Physics of Materials

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course begins with an in-depth discussion of the structure of the atom and the nucleus, as well as other quantum physics concepts. Material properties, such as hardness and ductility, are explained by examining the crystal structure of materials. The band structure of materials is discussed and used to explain the wide range of electrical conductivities and optical absorption properties of conducting, semiconducting, insulating and superconducting materials. The magnetic properties of materials are also examined in some detail. The laboratory portion of the course is designed to give the student hands-on experience in determining various fundamental properties of materials, such as atomic and crystal structure, optical emission and absorption, electrical conductivity, x-ray emission and absorption and nuclear decay. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have credit for PH 2030 or PH 2031 . This course is designated as a laptop course. (prereq: CH 200  or CH 200A  or CH 200B  or CH 310 , PH 123  or PH 2021. Not for credit for engineering students.)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the properties of electrons, protons, and neutrons and how they are arranged in atoms
    • State the approximate size of atoms
    • Understand the details of the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom and how the Bohr model leads to quantized electron energies
    • Differentiate between the wave and particle (photon) pictures of electromagnetic radiation
    • Differentiate between the wave and particle pictures of matter
    • Understand the electronic structure of multi-electron atoms
    • State the difference between single crystal, polycrystalline, and amorphous solids
    • Understand how crystal structure, grain size, and defect affect material properties such as hardness and ductility
    • State the differences in the energy band structure between conductors, semiconductors, and insulators and explain how these differences affect the electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and optical absorption properties of solids
    • Understand the basic properties of the PN junction such as rectification and breakdown, as well as have a basic understanding of bipolar and field effect transistor operation
    • State the differences between ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic, and diamagnetic materials, and understand the origins of these properties from an atomic point of view
    • Understand the different techniques used in materials analysis, such as x-ray diffraction and emission, Auger spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, electron microscopy, etc.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electric and magnetic fields
    • Newtonian mechanics
    • Atomic chemistry
    • Calculus and algebra skills

    Course Topics
    • Atomic structure and the Bohr atom (4 classes)
    • Crystalline nature of solids (6 classes)
    • Electrical properties of solids (6 classes)
    • Optical properties of solids (5 classes)
    • Magnetic properties of solids (6 classes)
    • Review (1 class)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Verification of the Bohr model for atomic hydrogen
    • X-ray diffraction of a single crystal
    • X-ray diffraction of polycrystalline materials
    • Determination of the band gap of silicon by optical absorption
    • X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy
    • Resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance for copper
    • Absorption coefficients and optical density of transparent materials
    • Determination of magnetic moment

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • PH 401 - Topics in Physics

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers current topics in physics that are not covered in other classes. Topics and structure, as well as credits, may vary. Faculty areas of expertise and possible topics for this course are listed on the Physics and Chemistry Department pages in the undergraduate catalog and on the Web. Groups of students interested in a particular topic should contact the appropriate faculty member well in advance of registration for the quarter. Credit in this course will be determined after consultation with the instructor. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Vary by course offering

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Depend on the course offering

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • PH 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students are given the opportunity to pursue an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled course work. This may take the form of individual or small group studies, literature surveys, and laboratory or research projects. Weekly meetings with the course advisor are required. A final report to be filed in the Physics and Chemistry Department may also be required. This course is offered to students with junior or senior standing. Students with freshman or sophomore standing should request PH 199 . Up to three credits in PH 499 may be counted towards the Minor in Physics. (prereq: consent of the course coordinator and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have had the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Have broadened his/her specific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • To be determined

    Laboratory Topics
    • Depends on topic selected

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev
  
  • PH 2011 - Physics I - Mechanics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, and momentum. The mathematical level of this course includes the use of vector algebra and elementary applications of differential and integral calculus. The laboratory part of the course emphasizes measurement precision, experimental technique, analysis of data, and report writing. Together with Physics II and Physics III (PH 2021 and PH 2031), this course provides one year of university level physics. No more than 4 credits can be counted in any combination with PH 113 or PH 130. (prereq: one year of high school physics with a grade of B) (coreq: MA 136  or MA 136A )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use calculus to develop kinematics equations for the position, velocity, and acceleration of an object as a function of time, and use these to solve kinematic problems
    • Use Newton’s Second Law of Motion to solve dynamics problems
    • Identify forces related to each other through Newton’s Third Law of Motion
    • Determine the work done on an object
    • Use the Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem to solve problems
    • Use the Conservation of Energy Principle and Conservation of Linear Momentum
    • Use the gravitational force law to solve dynamics problems
    • Relate the gravitational potential energy to the idea of a gravitational field
    • Evaluate the behavior of simple harmonic motion
    • Develop the kinematics equations for the angular velocity and angular acceleration of an object as functions of time, and use these to solve rotational kinematics problems
    • Evaluate the torque on a system and determine the angular acceleration and the moment of inertia of an object

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Perform arithmetic operations using scientific notation and significant figures
    • Convert from one set of units to another. (SI and British)
    • Resolve a vector into its components, and add and subtract vectors
    • Solve one-dimensional kinematics problems with constant acceleration, and to understand the difference between velocity and speed
    • Perform basic laboratory techniques involving measurements, graphing, and error analysis
    • Evaluate the derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions
    • Interpret the derivatives (and slopes of graphs) in terms of position, velocity, and acceleration of a moving particle

    Course Topics
    • One dimensional kinematics with constant acceleration (1 class)
    • Kinematics in two dimensions with constant or non-constant acceleration (4 classes)
    • Application of Newton’s Laws of Motion, for both static and dynamic problems (9 classes)
    • Work & Energy, Impulse & Momentum (6 classes)
    • Simple harmonic motion (1 class)
    • Gravitation (3 classes)
    • Torque and angular motion (3 classes)
    • Testing (3 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • An object in free fall
    • Projectile motion
    • Uncertainties in measurements; graphical analysis
    • Propagation of uncertainties
    • Friction
    • Free fall with air resistance
    • Conservation of mechanical energy
    • Work and energy
    • Oscillatory motion
    • Experimental design and analysis

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Olsson
  
  • PH 2011A - Physics I - Mechanics

    4 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, and momentum. The mathematical level of this course includes the use of vector algebra and elementary applications of differential and integral calculus. The laboratory part of the course emphasizes measurement precision, experimental technique, analysis of data, and report writing. Together with Physics II and Physics III (PH 2021 and PH 2031), this course provides one year of university level physics. No more than 4 credits can be counted in any combination with PH 113 or PH 130. This course is designed for students who did not take physics in high school or need a refresher course because they took a physics class in the past. (prereq: none) (coreq: MA 136  or MA 136A )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Use calculus to develop kinematics equations for the position, velocity, and acceleration of an object as a function of time, and use these to solve kinematic problems
    • Use Newton’s Second Law of Motion to solve dynamics problems
    • Identify forces related to each other through Newton’s Third Law of Motion
    • Determine the work done on an object
    • Use the Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem to solve problems
    • Use the Conservation of Energy Principle and Conservation of Linear Momentum
    • Use the gravitational force law to solve dynamics problems
    • Relate the gravitational potential energy to the idea of a gravitational field
    • Evaluate the behavior of simple harmonic motion
    • Develop the kinematics equations for the angular velocity and angular acceleration of an object as functions of time, and use these to solve rotational kinematics problems
    • Evaluate the torque on a system and determine the angular acceleration and the moment of inertia of an object

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • One dimensional kinematics with constant acceleration (2 classes)
    • Kinematics in two dimensions with constant or non-constant acceleration (6 classes)
    • Application of Newton’s Laws of Motion, for both static and dynamic problems (14 classes)
    • Work & energy, impulse & momentum (8 classes)
    • Simple harmonic motion (2 classes)
    • Gravitation (4 classes)
    • Testing (4 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • An object in free fall
    • Projectile motion
    • Uncertainties in measurements; graphical analysis
    • Propagation of uncertainties
    • Friction
    • Free fall with air resistance
    • Conservation of mechanical energy
    • Work and energy
    • Oscillatory motion
    • Experimental design and analysis

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Olsson
  
  • PH 2021 - Physics II - ElectroMagnetism

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course is the calculus-based continuation of PH 2011 . The purpose of this subject is to acquaint the students with the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism. Particular topics include electrostatic vector fields, scalar potential, capacitance and dielectrics, energy and force in electrostatic systems, current, resistance and electromotive force, magnetic fields and forces and electromagnetic waves. PH 2021 is taught in an integrated lecture-lab format. (prereq: PH 2011  or PH 2011A ) (coreq: MA 137  or MA 137A )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concept of electric charge and be able to determine the electric forces between, and the electric field produce by point charges
    • Determine the electric fields produced by distributed charges and conductors
    • Determine the motion of point charges and electric dipoles in an electric field
    • Understand electric potential (V) in terms of potential energy as well as in relationship to the electric field
    • Understand the relationships between C, V, E, Q and U for a capacitor
    • Make basic electric circuit calculations
    • Relate the macroscopic concepts (V, I, R etc.) to the corresponding field and microscopic concepts (E, j, rho etc.)
    • Determine the magnetic forces and torques on moving charges and currents.
    • Determine the magnetic fields produced by currents as well as by magnetic material.
    • Apply the concept of changing magnetic flux to determine the induced emf
    • Determine the basic properties of electromagnetic waves
    • Use graphical analysis to analyze the results of an experiment
    • Do a proper uncertainty analysis

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • College-level algebra
    • Units, exponential notation and prefixes
    • Vector algebra - dot and cross products
    • Differentiation of polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions
    • College level calculus base mechanics - kinematics, dynamics and energy concepts
    • Be familiar with the atomic picture of material - Periodic Table of Elements
    • College level lab experience - techniques, safety, and report writing

    Course Topics
    • Introduction (1 hour)
    • Coulomb’s and Gauss’ laws (8 hours)
    • Electric potential and potential energy (5 hours)
    • Capacitance (5 hours)
    • Current, resistance, and electromotive force (5 hours)
    • Microscopic description of current flow (4 hours)
    • Magnetic forces and fields (10 hours)
    • Electromagnetic induction (4 hours)
    • Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves (4 hours)
    • Tests (3 hours)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Electrostatic deflection of electrons
    • Electric potential and field in a cylindrical electrode configuration
    • Equipotential surfaces and electric field lines
    • Parallel plate capacitors
    • RC time constant
    • Resistivity of water                                       
    • Weighing the electron (mass spectrometer and velocity selector)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nazieh Masoud
  
  • PH 2031 - Waves, Optics, Thermodynamics, and Quantum Physics

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course is a continuation of Physics I and Physics II. This course begins with a brief review of traveling wave theory, and then applies this theory to multiple waves traveling in the same medium, standing waves, resonance, and interference effects involving both light and sound. Polarization, reflection, and refraction of light is also discussed. The basic thermodynamic properties of gasses and kinetic theory of gasses, as well as the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics are discussed and applied to various thermodynamic processes and heat engines. The three mechanisms of heat transfer will also be discussed. The quantum nature of the universe is then explored. The quantum nature of light is used to explain Blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, x-ray production and absorption, the emission and absorption of light by atoms, and other atomic scale phenomena. This course concludes with a discussion of Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity. The sources, uses, and hazards of ionizing radiation are explored in the laboratory portion of this course. Together with Physics I and Physics II (PH 2011  and PH 2021 ), this course provides one year of comprehensive university level physics. (prereq: PH 2021  and MA 137  or MA 137A ) (coreq: MA 231  or MA 2314  or MA 3501 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Waves, resonance, wave optics, and wave interference:

    • Explain the differences between transverse waves and longitudinal waves
    • Write the traveling wave equation given information concerning a wave’s wavelength, frequency, direction of travel, and amplitude, and be able to determine the wavelength, frequency, travel direction, and amplitude of a traveling wave given the equation of the traveling wave.
    • Write the standing wave equation for two waves having the same frequency and amplitude traveling in opposite direction in the same medium, and understand the concept of standing waves
    • Calculate the resonant frequencies associated with simple one-dimensional systems
    • Understand the origin of and perform calculations involving single and double slit interference
    • Understand the concept of polarization of transverse waves, and perform calculations involving intensity as a function of the angle between polarization angles of two polarizers (Law of Malus) and the angle at which complete polarization of the reflected light occurs from a material with a known index of refraction (Brewster’s law)
    • Calculate the position and magnification of a real image from a converging lens or mirror given the focal length of the optical element and the location of the object with respect to the converging mirror or lens (LABORATORY ONLY)

    Thermodynamics:

    • Understand that temperature is directly related to the thermal energy stored in a medium
    • Use the ideal gas law to calculate pressure, temperature, volume, and number of moles or molecules present in a confined gas using SI units
    • Understand the microscopic origins of pressure and temperature, and be able to perform calculations involving pressure, temperature, RMS speed, and RMS molecular kinetic energy using SI units
    • Perform calculations involving thermal expansion in one, two, and three dimensions
    • Calculate heat conduction for a uniform cross section heat conductor
    • Qualitatively understand the process of heat transfer by convection in liquids and gasses
    • Understand that a pressure versus volume diagram graphically illustrates the work done by a gas as the volume of the gas changes
    • Calculate the work done when a gas undergoes constant temperature, constant pressure, constant volume, adiabatic, and cyclic processes
    • Understand that the First Law of Thermodynamics is nothing more than a statement of the conservation of energy, and be able to use the First Law of Thermodynamics to calculate the work done, internal energy change, and heat added to or removed from a gas during a thermodynamic process
    • Understand the pressure versus volume diagram for a generic heat engine and be able to perform calculations involving heat input, work output, and efficiency of a generic heat engine
    • Understand the concept of entropy and entropy changes in reversible and irreversible processes
    • Understand the concept of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and be able to explain why heat engines cannot be 100% efficient converting heat input to work output
    • Calculate the Carnot and real life efficiencies of heat engines, and be able to explain why Carnot engines are more efficient than real heat engines

    The Quantum Nature of the Universe:

    • Compare and contrast light as waves and light as photons, and be able to convert the wavelength of light to the equivalent photon energy
    • Understand the intensity versus wavelength distribution of a blackbody radiator, and be able to calculate the total power output and maximum intensity wavelength of a blackbody radiator (Stefan’s law and Wien’s law)
    • Understand the physics underlying the photoelectric effect and Compton effect, and be able to perform calculations involving the photoelectric effect and Compton effect
    • Compare and contrast the particle nature and wave nature of matter and be able to calculate the De Broglie wavelength of a particle
    • Understand how the wave nature of matter leads to quantized electron energies in the atomic hydrogen atom and be able to calculate the emission wavelengths from excited atomic hydrogen atoms and the x-ray emission wavelengths of heavy elements

    Einstein’s Special Relativity:

    • State and understand Einstein’s two postulates of Special Relativity
    • Understand the physical concepts underlying time dilation and length contraction, and be able to perform calculation involving time dilation and length contraction
    • Understand the concepts of relativistic momentum and energy, and be able to explain why objects with mass must travel slower than the speed of light
    • Understand the equivalence of mass and energy and be able to perform calculations involving the conversion of mass to energy and energy to mass
    • Calculate the radiation pressure associated with electromagnetic radiation

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understand the equations representing traveling waves
    • Understand Coulomb’s Law and the interaction of charges with electric fields 
    • Understand electric potential energy and the definition of the electron volt
    • Understand the meaning of a derivative and integral and be able to differentiate and integrate typical functions

    Course Topics
    Review of Basic wave theory from PH 2021  and multiple waves acting in the same medium (4 classes)

    • Review of transverse versus longitudinal waves
    • Review of traveling wave equations, angular frequency, wave number
    • Two waves acting in the same medium - the superposition principle
    • Standing waves and resonance

    Wave optics (3 classes and 1 laboratory experiment)

    • Reflection and refraction, including total internal reflection
    • Polarization - Law of Malus and Brewster’s law
    • Double slit and single slit diffraction, diffraction gratings
    • Thin film interference
    • Image formation and magnification using mirrors and lenses - LAB ONLY

    Basic thermodynamics (3 classes)

    • Temperature
    • Thermal expansion
    • Heat transfer by conduction and convection
    • The ideal gas law
    • Kinetic theory of gasses and the physical origin of pressure

    The First Law of Thermodynamics  (3 classes)

    • Heat energy, internal energy change, and work done by gasses
    • Pressure - Volume diagrams and work done during isochoric, isothermal, isobaric, adiabatic and cyclic processes

    The second Law of Thermodynamics and Heat Engines (3 classes)

    • The Second Law of Thermodynamics
    • Entropy changes is reversible and irreversible process, Carnot efficiency
    • Heat engines                                          

    The quantum nature of the universe (7 classes)

    • Blackbody radiation - electromagnetic radiation acting as photons
    • The photoelectric effect and Compton effect
    • The Bohr model of the atom and atomic spectra
    • The wave nature of matter (De Broglie’s postulate)
    • Quantized electron energies in atoms - The Bohr model for atomic Hydrogen
    • Infrared, visible and ultraviolet and x-ray emission and absorption spectra of isolated atoms

    Einstein’s Special Relativity (4 classes)

    • Einstein’s postulates of special relativity - Motion is measured with respect to a frame of reference, speed of light constant in any reference frame 
    • Time dilation and length contraction
    • Energy and momentum in relativity
    • Why objects with mass cannot travel at the speed of light
    • E = mc2, the equivalence of mass and energy
    • Light has no mass but carries momentum and radiation pressure

    Ionizing radiation: hazards and uses - LABORATORY ONLY

    • Definition of ionizing radiation
    • Types of ionizing radiation
    • Radioactive source activity
    • Biological hazards of ionizing radiation and radiation dose
    • Uses of ionizing radiation
    • Units of activity, dose
    • Half lives of radioactive materials
    • Uses of ionizing radiation - XFS and XRD

    Laboratory Topics
    • Week 1: Laboratory introduction and safety AND loading the LabVIEW software on student laptops AND speed of sound in air using ultrasonic sound waves
    • Week 2: Image formation using convex lenses and concave mirrors
    • Week 3: Single and double slit interference, AND determination of the interatomic lane spacing in an LiFsingle crystal using X-Ray diffraction
    • Week 4: Design experiment: specific heat of water or another liquid
    • Week 5: Blackbody radiation - Power radiated is proportional to temperature to the fourth power (light bulb experiment) AND radiation safety lecture (required by our radioactive materials license)
    • Week 6: Balmer series of atomic hydrogen and observation of various emission spectra using diffraction gratings
    • Week 7: X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - the identification of unknown metals
    • Week 8: Activity of the cesium 137 radioactive source and worst case dose from the cesium 137 source
    • Week 9: Half live of radioactive silver
    • Week 10: Gamma ray spectroscopy - determining the mass of the electron, Compton effect, and (possibly) identification of an unknown radioactive isotope

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nazieh Masoud

  
  • PH 3600 - Physics of Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This subject is intended to provide students with the fundamentals of semiconductor physics and its application to common semiconductor devices. The course starts with an in-depth look at the theory of semiconductors including energy gap, Fermi-Dirac statistics, mobility of electrons and holes, influence of temperature on conductivity, doping, photoconductivity, drift and diffusion of charge carriers and the (Shockley) ideal diode equation. Then, properties of the abrupt p-n junction are studied and applied to various practical devices including the signal diode, zener diode, varactor diode, photo-diode, light-emitting diode, solar cell, bipolar junction transistor, and finally field effect transistors. The course has a strong laboratory component. About half the experiments illustrate fundamental properties of semiconductor materials and half explore the characteristics and properties of a variety of semiconductor devices. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have credit for PH 361 . (prereq: PH 2030 or PH 2031 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Characterize the four cubic crystal types, relate lattice constant to atomic density and use Miller indices to identify crystal planes
    • Differentiate electron energy bands in metals, semiconductors and insulators
    • Calculate intrinsic carrier density in a semiconductor from the energy band gap and temperature
    • Relate majority and minority carrier concentrations to the doping density and Fermi level
    • Calculate electrical conductivity from charge carrier densities and mobilities and relate drift current to electric field and voltage
    • Determine majority carrier type, concentration and drift velocity from the Hall voltage, magnetic field and current
    • Predict resistance of a semiconductor from the incident light power, wavelength, band gap, recombination time and dimensions
    • For a p-n junction, calculate contact potential, capacitance and current in forward or reverse bias from the doping levels, band gap, dimensions, and applied voltage
    • Describe the basic operation of photodetectors, solar cells, LEDs and LASER diodes and determine the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and efficiency of a solar cell or photodiode from the doping levels, device dimensions and optical generation rate
    • Predict the common emitter current gain of a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) from the doping levels and device dimensions, identify regions of minority carrier diffusion and explain the Early effect
    • Determine the threshold voltage, channel conductance and saturation current of a MOSFET from the doping levels and device dimensions and explain how the gate and drain voltages influence the channel current

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Electric and magnetic fields
    • Electric potential
    • The Bohr atom
    • Basic quantum theory

    Course Topics
    • Crystal structure (2 classes)
    • Energy band theory (1 class)
    • Charge carrier concentrations: Fermi statistics (3 classes)
    • Charge carrier drift and diffusion (3 classes)
    • Hall effect (1 class)
    • Thermistors and photoconductivity (2 classes)
    • P-n junction (5 classes)
    • Photonic p-n junction devices (3 classes)
    • Bipolar junction transistor (3 classes)
    • MOSFET (3 classes)
    • Device fabrication: photolithography and plasma processing (1 class)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Hall effect
    • Majority carrier type and concentration using hot and four-point probes
    • Extrinsic to intrinsic conductivity transition with temperature
    • Band gap determination by photonic absorption: direct and indirect
    • Carrier lifetime in a CdS photocell
    • P-n junction reverse bias capacitance
    • BJT current gain and Early effect
    • MOSFET: linear and saturation characteristics
    • LED as photodetector and I-V characteristics of various two terminal devices: rectifiers, breakdown diodes, LEDs and solar cell

    Coordinator
    Dr. Richard Mett
  
  • PH 3710 - Intro to Biophysics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides grounding in the physical principles that underlie the properties of biomolecules and phenomena in cell biology. Applies physical models to understand many biological systems at a quantitative level. Biorheology, Brownian motion and molecular transactions in macromolecules, membrane channels and pumps and molecular motors are introduced. (prereq: CH 223 , PH 2030)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply knowledge of basic sciences, including physics, mathematics, and biology
    • Understand the impact of the biophysical techniques on the scientific issues in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context and recognize the need for a life-long learning approach towards new professional ideas
    • Describe physics of heat energy, free energy, and internal energy and their relation to biological systems
    • Understand the hierarchy of scales in a cell and learn the biological macromolecules
    • Apply the physics of the random walk, Brownian motion, friction, and diffusion to biological systems and describe different types of transport across the membrane
    • Describe and calculate the Reynolds number and utilize it to qualify the relative importance of friction and inertia
    • Analyze the behavior and phenomena in biological systems based on energy and entropy arguments
    • Describe osmotic pressure and the applications of Laplace law and physical aspects of surface tension
    • Explain how living cells generate electricity, and describe the molecular machines in membranes, the ion pumping, and the rotary motors
    • Understand Nerve impulses and describe ionic basis of resting membrane potential and actual potential
    • Develop scientific writing and communication skills through term paper and class discussion

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Familiar with Kinetic Theory, 1st and 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, the ideal gas law, and the concept of entropy
    • Familiar with different types of biomolecules, DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, etc. and understand the structures and functions of these biomolecules

    Course Topics
    • Cellular components and biological molecules: The physical aspects of cell function and structure, hierarchy, molecular components and molecular devices
    • Diffusion and transport in cell. Random walks, friction, and diffusion Brownian motion, diffusion laws, diffusion equation, Fick’s Law and biological applications of diffusion
    • The low Reynolds number world and biological applications
    • Entropy, temperature, and free energy
    • Microscopic view of entropic forces, osmotic pressure, and surface tension, ion cloud distributions, and charged surfaces
    • Molecular machines in membranes. Electro osmotic effects, Donnan equilibrium, Ion pumping, rotary motors
    • Nerve impulses, ion channels, action potential

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nazieh Masoud

Science

  
  • SC 310 - Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will provide students with the basic scientific concepts in physics, chemistry, materials science and biology that are critical to understanding nanoscale science and nanotechnology. The significance of quantum, electrical, physical and magnetic properties at the nanoscale will be contrasted with these properties at the macro- and microscale. The tools used to manipulate atoms, molecules, and materials and the students’ synthetic strategies for producing nanoscale materials and devices will be discussed. Current applications of nanoscale science and nanotechnology will be highlighted with each physical, chemical, biological and materials-based concept explored. (prereq: CH 200 , CH 200A , CH 200B  or CH 2100H and MA 136  or MA 136A )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the principles governing manufacturing nanoscopic structures
    • Discern and predict the governing principles in self-assembly processes
    • Describe the current state and potential future impact of nanotechnology
    • Explain how physical and chemical properties changes at the nanoscale
    • Select the best scientific instrument for nanoscale applications
    • Explain the significance of the surface/volume ratio in nanostructures
    • Explain the significance of quantum effects at the nanoscale
    • Describe how nanoscale features change materials’ properties
    • Explain the necessary considerations for employing biological molecules in nanoscale materials and devices
    • Compare and contrast electrical, physical, magnetic, and quantum properties at the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale
    • Compare and contrast NEMs and MEMs
    • Explain the significant design considerations for manufacturing and employing nanoscale devices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Self-assembly
    • Nanoscale allotropes of carbon: fullerenes and nanotubes
    • Quantum dots and nanoparticles
    • Molecular electronics and nanowires
    • Surface properties of atoms
    • Quantum effects at the nanoscale
    • Bio-nanotechnology
    • Synthetic strategies for producing nanoscale materials and devices
    • Design of biomolecules and materials for nanoscale applications
    • Comparison of electrical, physical and magnetic properties at the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale.
    • Atomic force microscopy
    • Societal implications of nanotechnology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Anne-Marie Nickel
  
  • SC 370 - Geology and Geophysics

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a survey of geology and geophysics. It provides a description of how modern science can be used to probe the interior of the Earth, and how volcanoes, earthquakes and glaciers have changed and are changing the face of the Earth. A field trip to the Northern Kettle Moraine to study glacial features is included. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Know how geophysical measurements are used to make predictions about the earth’s structure
    • Describe how the earth has been and will be modified by various geological processes in the past, present, and future
    • Identify those geographical locations where significant geological events have occurred, or are likely to occur
    • Fill in the “gaps” in a typical newspaper, or newsweekly article that describes a particular geological process or event, so that the content can be of greater interest to a student
    • Know the difference between silicates, carbonates and sulfides
    • Know the difference between igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
    • Know the difference between convergent and divergent plate boundaries and transform faults, and know what types of earthquakes occur at each
    • Know which type of volcano produces which type of lava, and which is most dangerous
    • Describe the processes by which rock is eroded and becomes soil
    • Know how radioactive dating and fossil dating work
    • Know the different types of seismic waves
    • Know which type of fault gives rise to which type of earthquake
    • Know what kind of damage is caused by each kind of earthquake
    • Describe the processes inside the earth’s interior that give rise to plate tectonics
    • Explain how the magnetic bands on the sea floor provide evidence for continental drift
    • Know how mountains are formed
    • Know the causes of landslides and sinkholes
    • Know how groundwater is affected by pumping and pollution
    • Describe how glaciers shaped the terrain of Wisconsin
    • Recognize glacial features such as kames, eskers, kettles, moraines and drumlins
    • Understand what causes various types of sand dunes to move and grow
    • Distinguish the different types of shorelines

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Minerals (1 class)
    • Volcanoes (1 class)
    • Sedimentary rocks (1 class)
    • Geologic time (3 classes)
    • Earth’s interior (1 class)
    • Mountain building (1 class)
    • Running water (1 class)
    • Glaciers (1 class)
    • Shorelines (1 class)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • SC 371 - Oceanography

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This subject introduces the student to the physical study of the ocean and its basin. Specific topics include: the nature of the ocean bottom and its relation to continental drift; ocean currents, causes, locations, characteristics and effects on land masses; and ocean wave mechanics, physics of sea water, acoustical properties of the ocean and the instruments and techniques used to measure ocean properties. Also studied are the interaction between warm water masses and the atmosphere, which acts as a heat engine, causing energy interchanges which produce much of the Earth’s weather. A detailed exploration is made of the potential of the ocean to supply large amounts of energy from its mechanical, electrical, thermal, and chemical resources. The course includes a visit to the Milwaukee Maritime Center. (prereq: junior standing)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the terms and units used in describing ocean currents
    • Calculate the duration and fetch required to produce a fully developed “sea” (rough ocean) at a given wind speed
    • Describe the behavior of the tides in terms of the sun and moon positions and the shape of the ocean basin
    • Calculate the speed of tsunamis and other waves by knowing the depth of the ocean and the period and wavelength of the wave
    • Describe the chemical nature of ocean water, including the minerals dissolved in it
    • State the main sources of minerals dissolved in the ocean
    • Describe the different types of shorelines and their development over geological time as well as recent time
    • Explain the salinity and current patterns in different types of estuaries
    • Understand the interaction between the oceans and the Earth’s weather
    • Explain the distribution of life forms over different parts of the ocean
    • Name the different regions of the ocean in which life forms can be found and understand the terms used to describe these life forms
    • Discuss the various methods of exploring the ocean, such as sonar, submersibles, and unmanned probes

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Ocean currents (6 classes)
    • Ocean bottom (3 classes)
    • Ocean wave mechanics (3 classes)
    • Physics of sea water (7 classes)
    • Acoustical properties of the ocean (3 classes)
    • Oceans and weather (3 classes)
    • Life in the ocean (5 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Steven Mayer
  
  • SC 499 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    Students are given the opportunity to pursue an approved subject not covered in regularly scheduled course work. This may take the form of individual or small group studies, literature surveys, and laboratory or research projects. Weekly meetings with the course advisor are required. A final report to be filed in the Physics and Chemistry Department may also be required. This course is offered to students with junior or senior standing. (prereq: consent of the course coordinator and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have had the opportunity to plan a course of study
    • Have broadened his/her scientific knowledge

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • To be determined

    Laboratory Topics
    • Depends on topic selected

    Coordinator
    Dr. Matey Kaltchev

Software Engineering

  
  • SE 400 - Senior Design Project I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: completion of core courses through junior year (a maximum of two may be missing) or approved plan of study to complete the degree by the following Fall Quarter)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in the design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support design and planning
    • Develop and execute experiments to minimize uncertainty and use the results to justify design decisions
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management and source control
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in requirements analysis, software architecture and design, software verification and validation, and team software process and either:
      • No more than 2 core classes from the freshman through junior years may be missing
      • The student must have a feasible (approved by advisor and program director) plan to graduate no later than in the fall quarter after completing senior design

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements (1 class)
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 401 - Senior Design Project II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: SE 400  taken in same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in the design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support design and planning
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management, source control, and continuous integration
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks
    • Verify and validate that software developed functions as expected and meets requirements
    • Identify and address security concerns related to the software project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in requirements analysis, software architecture and design, software verification and validation, and team software process
    • Successfully completed SE 400  in same academic year

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 402 - Senior Design Project III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the third of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: SE 401  taken in the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management, source control, and continuous integration
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks
    • Verify and validate that software developed functions as expected and meets requirements
    • Identify and address security concerns related to the software project
    • Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities related to the software developed and make informed judgments that account for global, economic, environmental, and/or societal contexts
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects in a public forum

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Successfully completed SE 401  in same academic year

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Senior Design Show presentation (final exam week)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 1011 - Software Development I

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to object-oriented software development using the Java programming language. Emphasis is placed on translating written problem descriptions into robust software solutions. Topics covered include Java program structure, algorithmic problem solving and modularization, I/O statements, control constructs, looping techniques, class libraries, user-defined classes and methods, arrays, and ArrayLists. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Design and document an algorithmic solution for a given problem statement
    • Create and interpret complex expressions that use relational and Boolean operators
    • Select the appropriate selection control statement for a given task
    • Use while/do-while/for statements to control repetition in algorithmic solutions
    • Select the appropriate repetition control statement for a given task
    • Translate UML class diagrams into Java code
    • Design and implement simple classes
    • Design and implement class and object methods
    • Use existing Java class libraries
    • Design and implement simple Java programs
    • Declare and use collections of primitive and object data using arrays
    • Declare and use collections of object data using ArrayLists

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Exams
    • Algorithm development
    • Arithmetic operations
    • String and primitive data types
    • Java development basics
    • Selection
    • Iteration
    • Standard Java classes
    • Math library
    • UML class/sequence diagrams
    • OO programming
    • Methods and arguments
    • Class implementation
    • Arrays
    • ArrayLists
    • Review

    Laboratory Topics
    • Java development environment
    • Conditionals
    • Iteration
    • Standard Java classes
    • Class implementation
    • Arrays
    • Array lists

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 1021 - Software Development II

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course continues the study of objected-oriented software development using the Java programming language. Students design, document and implement software classes and incorporate these classes into larger applications. Topics covered include abstraction, encapsulation, declaring and implementing abstract data types, interfaces, inheritance, polymorphism, graphical user interfaces, simple event-driven programming, exception handling, and file I/O. (prereq: SE 1011 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the rationale for object-oriented design and programming
    • Translate UML class and sequence diagrams into Java code
    • Apply composition, inheritance, and interfaces
    • Distinguish between extending a class (inheritance) and implementing an interface
    • Define polymorphism
    • Design and implement simple Java classes and packages
    • Document the implementation of small software systems
    • Make appropriate use of exception handling
    • Use classes from the Java standard library to read and write files on disk
    • Use the Java API specification (javadoc) to determine correct use of standard library classes

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Selection and iteration statements
    • Simple Java programs
    • Simple Java classes
    • UML class diagrams into Java code
    • Arrays and ArrayLists

    Course Topics
    • Java fundamentals
    • GUI
    • Event-driven programming
    • Aggregation, composition, generalization, and realization in UML class diagrams
    • Inheritance and polymorphism
    • Interfaces/abstract classes
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O

    Laboratory Topics
    • ArrayLists
    • Inheritance
    • Interfaces
    • GUI
    • Event handling
    • Exception handling
    • File I/O

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 2030 - Software Engineering Tools and Practices

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the software engineering tools and practices - a look at typical approaches software engineers use to create applications in practice. Topics include requirements analysis, high-level design, detail-level design, UML modeling, code generation, basic unit testing, application building, continuous integration, and revision management. Laboratory assignments provide an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of these tools and how they are used in actual practice. (prereq: none) (coreq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Create UML class, state, and sequence diagrams using a CASE tool
    • Transform requirements documented as use cases into UML design models
    • Generate source code from UML design models, and synchronize subsequent changes
    • Create simple unit tests and execute them in a standard test framework
    • Maintain source code and related design documents in a revision control system
    • Create a deployable software package using an automated build tool
    • Create an installable software package using an automated build tool

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in a high-level object-oriented programming language
    • Knowledge of basic object-oriented programming concepts, data structures, and software design techniques

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the course and software engineering practices
    • Source code generation from UML models
    • Synchronizing source code with UML models
    • Use of a revision control system to archive source code and related documentation
    • Writing and executing Unit Tests using a framework
    • Use of an automated build tool for software package creation: meta-languages, scripts, rules, targets, actions
    • Software requirements analysis: reading use case scenarios and use case textual analysis
    • High-level design: requirements coverage, communication diagrams
    • Detailed design: class, communication, activity, state, and sequence diagrams

    Laboratory Topics
    • Development of various small software projects to facilitate practice and with integrated tool usage

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • SE 2040 - Software Development III

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to additional scripted, procedural, and object-oriented programming languages including C and C++. Students are introduced to the concepts of compilation, memory management, linking, low-level types, efficient implementation of objects, and the Standard Template Library. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain the key differences between Java and C/C++
    • Make use of C/C++ compiler pre-processor directives
    • Create and make use of C functions
    • Create and make use of C++ classes
    • Make use of the Standard C Library and C++ Standard Library
    • Distinguish and make use of argument passing by value, reference, and address
    • Make use of C++ polymorphism, particularly virtual vs. non-virtual methods
    • Manage C memory directly via malloc() and free()
    • Manage C++ memory directly via new and delete
    • Create and make use of C++ namespaces
    • Create and make use of C++ templates
    • Make use of C++ operator overloading
    • Discuss how typing systems influence efficiency, readability, and reliability
    • Write procedural and object-oriented programs in a scripting language

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Object-oriented programming, Java, data structures

    Course Topics
    • Procedural, object-oriented programming in a scripting language
    • Procedural, object-oriented C++ programming
    • Arrays, pointers, and dynamic data structures in C++
    • Separate compilation and C++ namespaces
    • Memory management in C++
    • Templates and the Standard Template Library
    • Procedural programming in C
    • Type systems in a scripting language, C, C++, and Java

    Laboratory Topics
    • Scripting languages (2 sessions)
    • C++ (7 sessions)
    • C (1 session)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 2800 - Software Engineering Process I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the software engineering process and the management of software projects. Topics covered include the software lifecycle, effort tracking, project planning, measurement and estimation, reviews and checklists, and software quality management. Laboratory assignments provide an opportunity for students to develop and enhance a defined process for their own work. (prereq: CS 2852 , SE 2030 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand basic concepts of the software engineering process
    • Understand the software process and product metrics
    • Work within a standard development process
    • Document process and product measurements
    • Plan and track software projects

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in high level programming language
    • Knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts, data structures, and basic software design techniques

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the course and the Scrum software process 
    • Software project management, product and process measures, estimation

    Laboratory Topics
    • Development of small software projects to facilitate practice and improvement in individual software processes
    • Final project report, including a brief oral presentation

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jonathon Magaña
  
  • SE 2811 - Software Component Design

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course deals with the design and implementation of software subsystems. The concept of design patterns is introduced and common patterns are applied to the development of software components. Laboratory projects provide an opportunity for students to implement components and to integrate them into complete systems. As a final assignment, small teams of students conduct research on software design patterns and present & demonstrate the results of their investigations to the class. (prereq: SE 2030 , CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply object-oriented design patterns in software application-specific contexts
    • Determine the appropriate design pattern to apply in a specific context
    • Design and implement small software components and systems
    • Apply UML class and sequence diagrams in the process of designing and documenting software applications
    • Conduct independent research on software design patterns

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in object-oriented programming
    • Knowledge of data structures and proficiency in their application
    • Familiarity with inheritance and polymorphism
    • Knowledge of UML diagram notation
    • Experience with source code repository tools
    • Experience with developing software in teams

    Course Topics
    • Principles of object-oriented software design
    • Using design patterns to develop maintainable software systems
    • Advantages and disadvantages of applying design patterns
    • Threading and thread synchronization

    Laboratory Topics
    • Application of specific design patterns (7 sessions)
    • Investigation of multi-threaded data collections (1 session)
    • Development and presentation of application to demonstrate the use of a researched design pattern (2 sessions)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 2832 - Introduction to Software Verification

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of software verification. Topics covered include the activities within testing, coverage criteria, basic testing techniques and types, basic testability metrics, and the application of testing tools. Laboratory assignments provide extensive opportunities to apply software verification techniques and tools. (prereq: CS 2852 , MA 2310 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Explain why testing is important to software development
    • Explain the relationship between verification and validation
    • Compose accurate and detailed defect reports and record defects into a defect tracking system
    • Using appropriate coverage criteria and testing theory, design and construct high quality testing approaches and prepare tests in a logical, organized fashion
    • Apply testing theory to design tests based on presented test criteria
    • Analyze the effectiveness of testing using testing metrics, mutation testing, and other techniques
    • Design and implement test cases using mock objects
    • Analyze a given piece of source code for complexity and testability

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • (Discrete Math): Directed graphs
    • (Discrete Math): Set theory
    • (Discrete Math): Predicates / Boolean algebra
    • (Programming) JUnit test case development

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction (1 lecture)
    • Fundamental testing terminology and techniques (2 classes)
    • Application of discrete math to testing (3 lectures)
    • Logic predicates and clauses (2 lectures)
    • Structural coverage of programs (2 lectures)
    • Structural coverage of finite state machines (1 lecture)
    • Input space partitioning (3 lectures)
    • Mock objects (2 lectures)
    • Syntax based testing (3 lectures)
    • Scripted testing and exploratory testing (2 lectures)
    • Test processes (3 lectures)
    • Regression testing (1 lecture)
    • Design issues and software testability (2 lectures)
    • Exam review, course assessment (3 lectures)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Basic testing with JUnit / Prerequisite Assessment(1 session)
    • Logic coverage testing (2 sessions)
    • Input space partitioning testing (1 session)
    • Code coverage tool usage (1 session)
    • Mutation testing (1 session)
    • Mock object testing (1 session)
    • State transition testing (1 session)
    • Source code complexity analysis (1 session)
    • User interface (GUI) testing (1 session)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • SE 2840 - Web Application Development

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to web application development.  Client- and server-side web technologies will be used to develop various web applications including simple web pages and forms, dynamic data-driven applications, web services applications, and highly interactive single-page applications. Topics covered include web application architecture, client- and server-side web development frameworks, HTTP, HTML, CSS, Bootstrap, JavaScript, AJAX, jQuery, Node.js, Angular, MongoDB, web services, single-page applications, and security. (prereq: CS 2852 CS 2911 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concepts, design, and application of REST, MVC, single page applications (SPA), and web application frameworks
    • Understand how to select the appropriate web application architecture
    • Design and implement highly interactive websites using server-side and client-side technologies to modify the appearance and operation of a web page
    • Understand the concept of dynamic, data-driven web applications
    • Design and develop web service applications
    • Design and develop single-page applications integrating various server-side database systems or web services
    • Understand the concepts, design, and implementation of secure web applications using authorization and authentication
    • Understand basic web security
    • Stay abreast of evolving web technology

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Object-oriented programming concepts
    • Data structure concepts
    • TCP/IP networking

    Course Topics
    • Introduction
    • REST and the architecture of the Web
    • DOM, HTML, and stylesheets
    • Web development environments
    • Dynamic HTML and client-side scripting with Javascript
    • Server-side scripting
    • Midterm review and midterm
    • MVC and Web design patterns
    • Web services and single page applications
    • Angular
    • NodeJS and Express
    • Databases and MongoDB
    • Developing secure applications
    • Web application project introduction
    • Advanced topics

    Laboratory Topics
    • Lab 1: HTML and CSS
    • Lab 2: Introduction to JavaScript
    • Lab 3: DOM Scripting and Event Handling
    • Lab 4: Bootstrap jQuery Stock Quotes
    • Lab 5: Dynamic database driven web applications
    • Lab 6: MVC
    • Lab 7: Web services 
    • Lab 8: Getting started with Node.js
    • Lab 9: Real time communication with Node.js and Websockets
    • Lab 10: Angular 

    Coordinator
    James Lembke
  
  • SE 3010 - Software Development Laboratory I

    4 lecture hours 0 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    The software development laboratory provides students the experience of working in a team on large-scale projects using software engineering tools and techniques. In this first course in the sequence, students are introduced to the laboratory environment and work on assigned tasks as members of project teams. (prereq: SE 2800 , SE 2811 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply software engineering practices and tools to the development of significant software components and systems
    • In a small team, identify client needs and develop a framework leading to potential solutions
    • Plan and track project activities
    • Communicate project and process information in written and oral form
    • Research and apply independently learned knowledge and skills to the development of software components and systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in software development using object-oriented design techniques
    • Experience with software design patterns
    • Proficiency in the use of an agile software development process in a small team environment

    Course Topics
    • Software development laboratory processes and tools
    • Team work on development projects

    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction to software development laboratory projects, processes, and infrastructure
    • Team work on development projects
    • Project report presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 3020 - Software Development Laboratory II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second course in the software development laboratory sequence, in which students work on large-scale software projects. As students develop their individual and team skills, they can take on additional responsibilities on project teams. (prereq: SE 3010 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply software engineering practices and tools to the development of significant software components and systems
    • Develop deliverable prototypes for evaluation by clients
    • Plan and track project activities
    • Communicate project and process information in written and oral form
    • Research and apply independently learned knowledge and skills to the development of software components and systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in software development using object-oriented design techniques
    • Experience with software design patterns
    • Proficiency in the use of an agile software development process in a small team environment

    Course Topics
    • Team work on development projects and staff assignments

    Laboratory Topics
    • Team work on development projects and staff assignments

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 3030 - Software Development Laboratory III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the third course in the software development laboratory sequence. Students work on large-scale software projects with a goal of delivering a system that could be deployed by clients. In addition, students gain additional experience at processes assessment and improvement. (prereq: SE 3020 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply software engineering practices and tools to the development of significant software components and systems
    • Develop deliverable prototypes for evaluation by clients
    • Plan and track project activities
    • Identify process improvement opportunities, implement those improvements, and evaluate their success
    • Communicate project and process information in written and oral form
    • Research and apply independently learned knowledge and skills to the development of software components and systems

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in software development using object-oriented design techniques
    • Experience with software design patterns
    • Proficiency in the use of an agile software development process in a small team environment

    Course Topics
    • Teamwork on development projects and staff assignments

    Laboratory Topics
    • Teamwork on development projects and staff assignments

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 3250 - Introduction to Game Development

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to game development, game programming, and the computer game industry. It reviews games in a social and historical context and covers the basics of game design and development. Game development and programming fundamentals are covered. Students complete a final game project based on course material.  (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe an overview of the computer gaming industry
    • Explain the basics of computer game design
    • Describe the challenges associated with modern computer game design
    • Describe the applicability of advanced software engineering and computer science techniques to game development
    • Apply advanced software engineering and computer science techniques to problems associated with computer game development
    • Discuss issues related to computer games in the greater societal context

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in high level programming language
    • Knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts, data structures, and basic software design techniques
    • Interest in computer games

    Course Topics
    • Introduction and history of computer gaming
    • Elements of fun and basic game design
    • Game programming fundamentals
    • Advanced game programming issues e.g. memory, sound, physics, AI 
    • Visual design 
    • Game industry overview
    • Legal and ethical issues

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • SE 3800 - Software Engineering Process II

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a more in-depth discussion of agile software development and quality assurance processes including behavior-driven development and continuous integration. It also discusses alternative development models and current software engineering topics. Course concepts are reinforced by classroom exercises and homework assignments. (prereq: SE 2800 , SE 2832 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Construct a continuous integration environment meeting the quality goals of a project
    • Apply behavior-driven development to develop usable, robust, maintainable systems
    • Identify key activities required to assure systems meet quality goals
    • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of agile and plan-based methodologies
    • Describe the key components of the Software Engineering Code of Ethics and Professional Practice

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Familiarity with agile software development principles and practices
    • Ability to design and implement unit tests

    Course Topics
    • Review and expanded coverage of agile software development process and practices
    • Continuous integration and test automation
    • Software quality practices and processes
    • Distributed version control system (DVCS) workflows
    • Current topics in software engineering

    Coordinator
    Dr. Robert Hasker
  
  • SE 3810 - Software Architecture

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits


    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to software architecture, the high-level design and structure of a software system, the discipline of creating such structures to satisfy quality requirements, and the documentation of these structures. Topics covered include quality attribute driven design; quality attribute design tactics; architectural styles and patterns; architecture tradeoff and cost-benefit analysis; skeletal system design, evaluation, and analysis; and coverage of contemporary topics in distributed, highly saleable software architectures. Laboratory assignments permit students to develop, evaluate, and implement their designs. (prereq: SE 2811 , SE 3821 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of software architecture and the discipline of designing system structures to satisfy quality requirements.
    • Understand how to document software architectures
    • Understand and apply quality attribute driven design
    • Understand design tactics for satisfying quality attribute responses
    • Understand and apply architectural styles and patterns to satisfy design tactics
    • Understand basic architecture tradeoff and cost-benefit analysis
    • Understand skeletal system design to facilitate architecture evaluation and analysis; and coverage of contemporary topics in distributed, highly saleable software architectures.
    • Work collaboratively as a member of a small design team

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Software requirements, including non-functional (quality) requirements
    • Software development process tools and methods

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to course and software architecture
    • Quality attributes, architectural styles, and architectural design patterns
    • The role of architecture in software development
    • Designing the architecture
    • Architectural design patterns and styles
    • Architecture analysis and reviews
    • Team project work
    • Software architecture case studies

     


    Laboratory Topics
    • Functional and non-functional requirements, business drivers, mapping requirements to architecture
    • Architecture design, prototyping, analysis, and review
    • Project presentations

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jonathan Magaña

  
  • SE 3821 - Software Requirements and Specification

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This course covers activities that relate to the determination and documentation of software system requirements. Topics covered include requirements elicitation, object-oriented analysis techniques, prototyping, requirements tracking, and re-engineering. (prereq: SE 2030 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the role of requirements engineering in a variety of software development models
    • Elicit requirements from system stakeholders and to overcome common obstacles to the elicitation process
    • Analyze and negotiate software requirements
    • Specify software requirements using industry standard documentation techniques (e.g.. UML, use cases etc.)
    • Specify requirements that are verifiable, traceable, measurable and testable
    • Verify that specified requirements are accurate, unambiguous, complete and consistent
    • Communicate software requirements in written documents and oral presentations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Familiarity with the software development lifecycle

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, issues, and terminology
    • Software requirements
    • Requirements elicitation
    • Requirements analysis and negotiation
    • Requirements specification
    • System modeling
    • Validation
    • Requirements management
    • Exams and reviews

    Coordinator
    Sean Jones
  
  • SE 3830 - Human-Computer Interaction

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides students with a basic set of skills in the area of user interface and user interaction design. Topics include designing user interfaces to take advantage of users’ prior knowledge, using engineering models of cognitive behavior to make design tradeoffs, and evaluation techniques for user interfaces. While the emphasis is on conventional graphical and Web user interfaces, examples will also be given of application of these techniques to mobile and embedded interfaces. The main objective of the course is to provide students with a minimum set of useful skills in the area of user experience and user interaction design. It is intended to support situations in which students are called upon to provide a user interface for an application and there are no other user interface design resources available. It is not designed to be the first course in a sequence of courses in this area nor is it intended to provide an overview of the field of human-computer interaction. (Some optional readings may be provided that give more of an overview.) (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the benefits of user interfaces that behave and can be operated in familiar ways
    • Review an application for compliance with a published style guide
    • Develop a basic style guide for a platform for which no published standard exists by reviewing existing, widely used applications
    • Given a sequence of steps that make up an operation in a user interface, be able to use the Keystroke Model to derive a time estimate for the operation
    • Given the geometry of a user interface, understand how to apply Fitt’s law to assess pointing or movement actions
    • Conduct a cognitive walkthrough
    • Design and follow the procedures for a heuristic evaluation
    • Design and quantitatively assess the procedures to carry out a usability study
    • Conduct a research survey of current methods in human computer interaction

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • A fundamental understanding of structured programming languages
    • A fundamental understanding of data structures and algorithms

    Course Topics
    • None provided

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • SE 3910 - Real-Time Systems

    3 lecture hours 2 lab hours 4 credits
    Course Description
    This intense design course introduces students to software development for real-time systems, which often have stringent timing constraints that must be satisfied even under adverse circumstances. Real-time applications include flight control systems, vehicle control systems, industrial processes, life-support systems, robotic manipulators, and multimedia applications. Special attention is paid to scheduling, latency minimization, bandwidth constraints, and other design issues that impact the design of these systems. Laboratory assignments provide experience in the design and implementation of realistic applications using a real-time operating system and embedded development board. (prereq: (CS 2711  or CE 1921) , and (CS 3840  or CS 3210 ), or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand concepts of time-critical computing and identify real-time systems
    • Get familiar with a host-target development environment for time-critical systems
    • Write multitasking computer programs with inter-task communication and synchronization
    • Apply concepts of inter-task communication and synchronization via shared memory, message queues, signals, semaphores, and mutexes
    • Understand real-time kernels and task scheduling
    • Understand concepts of reliability in relation to real-time software
    • Construct distributed real-time applications using a real-time operating system
    • Analyze the performance of a real-time system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • C++ programming
    • The C Compiler model
    • UNIX code development
    • Scheduling
    • Basic computer organization

    Course Topics
    • Basic real-time systems concepts (3 lectures)
    • Raspberry Pi architecture (2 lectures)
    • Usage of an oscilloscope (1 lecture)
    • Cross compilation (2 lectures)
    • Response time and latency (1 lecture)
    • GPIO (1 lecture)
    • Multithreading in C++ (2 lectures)
    • Socket and interprocess communications (2 lectures)
    • Software PWM (1 lecture)
    • Basic electrical circuits (2 lectures)
    • RMA (2 lectures)
    • Sensors and input devices (2 lectures)
    • Open CV introduction and applications (2 lectures)
    • Buffering and queuing theory (1 lecture)
    • Reliability, performance, and ethical concerns (2 lectures)
    • Assessment, review, and current (4 lectures)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Introduction to software development on the Raspberry Pi
    • Basic I/O Operations on the Raspberry Pi
    • Development of a simple real-time game
    • Networking with the Raspberry Pi
    • Basic robotics control
    • Basic sensors (multiweek)
    • Camera interface and streaming
    • RMA analysis and streamed video (multiweek)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • SE 4000 - Senior Design Project I

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the first of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: completion of core courses through junior year (a maximum of two may be missing) or approved plan of study to complete the degree by the following Fall Quarter)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in the design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support design and planning
    • Develop and execute experiments to minimize uncertainty and use the results to justify design decisions
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management and source control
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in requirements analysis, software architecture and design, software verification and validation, and team software process and either:
      • No more than 2 core classes from the freshman through junior years may be missing
      • The student must have a feasible (approved by advisor and program director) plan to graduate no later than in the fall quarter after completing senior design

    Course Topics
    • Course introduction, report and presentation requirements (1 class)
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4010 - Senior Design Project II

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the second of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: SE 4000  taken in same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in the design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Investigate, evaluate, integrate, and apply technologies and standards beyond previous coursework to support design and planning
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management, source control, and continuous integration
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks
    • Verify and validate that software developed functions as expected and meets requirements
    • Identify and address security concerns related to the software project

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Proficiency in requirements analysis, software architecture and design, software verification and validation, and team software process
    • Successfully completed SE 4000  in same academic year

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4020 - Senior Design Project III

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This is the third of three courses in the senior design sequence where students work as a team on a significant software project. Each student team must specify, design, implement, document, and test a substantial software project. Teams meet regularly with their instructor to track technical and project management issues. (prereq: SE 4010  taken in the same academic year)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Work effectively and demonstrate initiative as a project team member
    • Communicate project status and technical content in oral and written form to coworkers and management
    • Capture requirements in user stories that describe incremental business value
    • Create user stories with unambiguous completion criteria
    • Apply analysis and synthesis in design process to produce software that meets specified completion criteria
    • Use principles from engineering, science, and mathematics to design and construct software that meets multiple realistic constraints
    • Employ software engineering processes to develop software
    • Use modern software engineering tools for process management, source control, and continuous integration
    • Identify, track, and mitigate technical and process risks
    • Verify and validate that software developed functions as expected and meets requirements
    • Identify and address security concerns related to the software project
    • Recognize ethical and professional responsibilities related to the software developed and make informed judgments that account for global, economic, environmental, and/or societal contexts
    • Communicate appropriate project aspects in a public forum

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Successfully completed SE 4010  in same academic year

    Course Topics
    • Team status meetings (weekly)
    • Senior Design Show presentation (final exam week)
    • Oral team presentations (4 classes)

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4840 - Software Maintenance and Craftsmanship

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to software evolution and maintenance.   The course begins with a discussion on software evolution and the different kinds of processes people use when conducting software maintenance.  Course lectures and activities will include select topics from the following technical domains: reverse engineering, reengineering, refactoring, software maintenance models, software craftsmanship and software reuse. Students will apply their knowledge by engaging in a quarter long course project to make incremental improvements to a non-trivial open-source software system.   (prereq: SE 3030 , senior standing and instructor consent)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Have a solid understanding of software evolution and maintenance
    • Reverse engineer a non-trivial system
    • Recognize and locate software design problems in code
    • Identify code smells and execute appropriate refactorings
    • Write high quality, self-documenting code

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Project experience on non-trivial software systems
    • Experience with SCM tools such as git

    Course Topics
    • Maintenance and evolution
    • Maintenance models
    • Software configuration management
    • Impact analysis
    • Program comprehension
    • Reengineering
    • Reverse engineering
    • Refactoring
    • Clean code

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4910 - Mobile Application Development

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the architecture, design, and development of software systems that support smart phones. Topics include the design and layout of native Android applications, implementing software with web APIs, using sensors in applications, and much more. Labs provide hands-on experience developing mobile applications. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the concepts of technological and societal convergence and how they can be applied to emerging technological trends
    • Understand the constraints and architectural requirements for developing mobile applications
    • Identify the design patterns involved in multi-tier distributed applications
    • Create efficient, event-driven graphical user interfaces for mobile devices
    • Understand local and remote mobile storage mechanisms
    • Understand mobile web standards and technology for integrating networked information and for providing interactive mobile user interactions
    • Understand mobile information architecture
    • Understand usability issues with developing mobile applications
    • Understand basic security requirements when developing mobile applications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Understanding of data structures

    Coordinator
    Dr. Derek Riley
  
  • SE 4910I - Mobile Application Development-iOS

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the architecture, design and development of applications for smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices that utilize the iOS operating system. Topics include the Swift programming language, mobile application design patterns, application frameworks and adaptation to specific devices. Labs provide hands-on experience in iOS application development. (prereq: CS 2852 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand the constraints and architectural requirements of mobile devices and systems
    • Identify and implement design patterns appropriate for mobile applications
    • Create efficient, event-driven graphical user interfaces for mobile devices
    • Select and use application frameworks and libraries
    • Produce applications that conform to user interface conventions and address usability issues encountered in mobile application development
    • Be aware of the economic, global and societal impact of mobile devices and applications

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Object-oriented design and programming

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to iOS and application walkthrough
    • Model-view-controller pattern implementation
    • Swift
    • Views
    • View controllers
    • Protocols and delegates
    • Mobile application development and entrepreneurship

    Laboratory Topics
    • Basic application development
    • Applications, views and drawing
    • View controllers
    • Table views
    • Touch events and gestures
    • Persistence of application state
    • Class project

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4930 - Developing Secure Software

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    The complexity of software applications and the value of the data being handled by these applications has risen significantly in recent times. Unfortunately, this has been accompanied by an increased number of malicious attacks trying to gain unauthorized access privileged data. Many of these attacks are successful because good “secure” development practices were not followed. This course provides an overview of the various techniques and best practices used in the different phases of a software development life cycle targeted towards the development of secure software. Students will work in teams using professional tools to analyze the security of existing systems, and students will read professional publications dealing with software security. (prereq: SE 2840  and SE 2800 , or consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Analyze a software architecture for potential security vulnerabilities and weaknesses
    • Analyze the threats against a software system and determine mitigation actions for these threats
    • Apply the principle of least privilege to software design and security
    • Perform an Architectural Risk Analysis on a software application
    • Assess a software package for security vulnerabilities using a commercial grade static analysis tool

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Basic Web applications development
    • Core software engineering discipline/process
    • Basic UML design
    • Use case analysis
    • Use case scenario development

    Course Topics
    • Introduction (1 class)
    • Exam and review (2 classes)
    • Course review and assessment (1 class)
    • The security problem (1 class)
    • Software security touchpoints (1 class)
    • Security requirements (1 class)
    • Abuse cases (1 class)
    • Design principles (2 classes)
    • Threat modeling (1 class)
    • Architectural risk analysis (1 class)
    • Static analysis (1 class)
    • Implementation mistakes (2 classes)
    • Security testing (2 classes)
    • Software security deployment (1 class)
    • The current state/ current events (2 classes)

    Laboratory Topics
    • Asset identification and analysis
    • Requirements analysis
    • Abuse case modeling
    • Hacking tutorial
    • Architectural design
    • Threat Modeling/Architectural Risk Analysis with the Microsoft SDL Threat Modeling Tool
    • Static analysis with the Fortify Static Analysis Tool
    • Penetration testing tutorial
    • Security Testing Tutorial
    • Emerging topics

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • SE 4940 - Network Security Tools and Practices

    2 lecture hours 2 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces students to cybersecurity through the application of tools and practices used in real-world network security analyses. Students learn the history of securing computer networks and the evolution of threats from hackers to sophisticated criminal organizations. Proactive security measures including authentication, encryption and firewalls are introduced. Students are given the opportunity to securely configure both wired and wireless networks.  Monitoring technologies including intrusion detection, packet sniffing and computer/network forensics approaches are discussed and applied. Lab exercises focus on the application of tools in a live network environment to achieve best practices in network security. (prereq: CS 2911  or CE 4961 , CS 3840  or CS 3841 )
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Assess and evaluate network security tools for use in defending, attacking and testing computer networks
    • Design a threat scenario and implement defenses to mitigate potential attacks
    • Perform a penetration test of a live network and assess the results
    • Discuss the legal and ethical issues involved with assessing and testing a network for vulnerabilities and weaknesses
    • Explain the challenges of securing a wireless network
    • Explain through case studies the ethical, technological, and legal impact of large scale botnets

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Network protocol fundamentals (ISO Network Stack, Hubs, switches, and routers, DHCP Protocol Operation, TCP/IP and UDP, DNS Operation, LAN vs WAN vs MAN)
    • Ethernet frames
    • Linux shell scripting and basic commands, such as ping, tracert, ipconfig/ifconfig
    • Virtual machine usage and operation including installing a VM and bridged versus NAT connections.

    Laboratory Topics
    • Basic network traffic analysis
    • Network enumeration
    • Encryption and tunneling
    • Rogue wireless system detection
    • Vulnerability assessment of network resources
    • Setting up wireless systems
    • Wireless site surveying
    • Detecting intrusions
    • Final project penetration test of controlled class network topology

    Coordinator
    Dr. Walter Schilling
  
  • SE 4980 - Topics in Software Engineering

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course allows for study of emerging topics in software engineering that are not present in the curriculum. Topics of mutual interest to faculty and students will be explored. (prereq: consent of instructor)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Varies

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor
  
  • SE 4999 - Independent Study

    1 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    A student enrolled in this course is afforded the opportunity to pursue a specialized topic in his or her chosen field of study. After an approved area of study has been selected, weekly meetings with the course adviser are required. A final report, the format of which is left to the discretion of the adviser, is required at the end of the term. (prereq: junior or senior standing in CE or SE, consent of instructor and department chair)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Engage in independent learning on a specialized topic
    • Document research or study results in a technical report

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • Varies

    Course Topics
    • Varies

    Coordinator
    Dr. Christopher Taylor

Social Sciences

  
  • SS 415A - African American Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course introduces the concepts and issues of the African American cultural contributions to the United States, the African American experience in a predominantly European American country, and African American struggles and cultural greatness. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the dynamics of African American culture in a learning environment
    • Describe the differences and similarities that exist between European American and African American cultures
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the great contributions Africa has made to world civilizations
    • Explain what it currently means to be African American in today’s society and how racism hurts everyone regardless of their color

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction to the class
    • From Africa to America
    • Evolution of the “Negro”
    • Africa’s American contributions to American culture
    • Ethnic notions
    • A question of color
    • Personal accounts of African Americans
    • Connection between sex and race
    • Socioeconomic status
    • Images of African Americans in the U.S.
    • Essays on change (3 classes)
    • Cultural accounts for cultural uniqueness
    • Dealing with the present and preparing for a better future
    • Test

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415AM - American Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    What exactly do we mean when we talk about American culture(s) in the new millennium? How do we as Americans view ourselves, and how do others perceive us? This course will explore what is uniquely American about our society’s behavior, beliefs, institutions, and arts and entertainment venues. Readings will include works from anthropologists, historians, journalists, and other scholars who will draw upon their observations of events and trends in American culture. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe primary aspects of American culture as it has been represented through various World Fairs or expositions held from the mid-19th to the late 20th centuries
    • Critically examine the social, political, economic, technological, and popular cultural currents at work in America during this period
    • Explain American culture through such topics as racism, sexism, eugenics, innovations, and economic cycles

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Jennifer Farrell
  
  • SS 415CA - Culture and Health in Central America

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course examines the culture of Central America with an emphasis upon the relationship between cultural practices and health.  The history and culture of Central America will be examined, as will the causes of the persistence of poverty among large segments of the population in Central American countries.  The course will examine in particular how the underdevelopment of the region and its poverty impact healthcare.  This course consists of classroom sessions on campus as well as a required trip to Central America during the break between Winter and Spring Quarters with the non-governmental organization Global Brigades.  Students must receive the instructors’ permission to register for this course. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the cultures of Central American societies and how the history of the region has shaped the economic, political, and religious institutions within Central American society 
    • Articulate how the persistent poverty in the region has negatively affected the quality of health and healthcare in Central America
    • Describe the public health strategies that are employed in Central America and other parts of the developing world to address these healthcare challenges
    • Apply the knowledge they have gained from classroom instruction to assess the causes of medical problems common among the populations of Central America 
    • Explain strategies employed to address these challenges during a trip to Central America to provide basic healthcare services with the non-governmental organization Global Brigades

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415CH - Chinese Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Chinese people and culture. Topics include geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics, and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the Chinese people and culture
    • Explain the geography and natural resources of the country
    • Describe the politics and current affairs of the country
    • Describe characteristics of the country’s art, religion and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the country’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415F - French Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will familiarize the student with a general frame of reference of French culture. The course will cover geographic information about forms of relief, rivers, mountains, climate and population distribution. A major outline of French history will be accompanied by the presentation of political events, important historical figures, and great cultural accomplishments. The last part of the course will cover the French educational system, immigration, and everyday life in France. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geographical and topographical position of France
    • Articulate a basic understanding of French history that shaped contemporary France
    • Explain several French institutions, such as education, government, industry, and religion
    • Describe major forms of architecture, art, mass media, and sports

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Introduction, requirements, papers
    • Geographical data
    • Historical background
    • Scientific tradition
    • Art and architecture
    • Education
    • Religion and immigration
    • Cultural aspects
    • Regional life in France
    • Sports, entertainment
    • Video presentations
    • General review
    • Exam

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415G - German Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course moves chronologically forward from the time of Germany’s first unification in 1871 to the present day, noting the interconnectedness of the past and the present. In an effort to define and explore aspects of German culture, students study and discuss political and philosophical writings, art, literature, and film, all within a specific historical context. Subtopics such as religion, education, geography, commerce, and recreation are also addressed. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe features that have promoted separateness rather than unification in a single entity called “Germany”
    • Identify the geographic regions and lifestyles developing from them
    • Recognize the influence of German heritage in the surrounding community
    • Seek out further experiences to enjoy in German artistic achievement
    • Explain how culture is ongoing: the past lives in the present

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Geography
    • History, general
    • The Nazi past and its present ramifications
    • How people earn a living
    • Education
    • Family life and customs
    • Recreation and food
    • Fine arts
    • Local German heritage
    • Tests

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415I - Introduction to Italian Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Italian people and culture. It includes such topics as geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geography and natural resources of the country
    • Describe the country’s politics and current affairs
    • Describe characteristics of the country’s art, religion, and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the country’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415IR - Irish Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Irish people and culture. It includes such topics as geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geographical and natural resources of the country
    • Describe the country’s politics and current affairs
    • Describe characteristics of the country’s art, religion, and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the country’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • No course topics appended

    Coordinator
    Margaret Dwyer
  
  • SS 415J - Japanese Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Japanese people and culture. It includes such topics as geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geographical facts of Japan and their contributions to its culture
    • Explain the history and culture of Japan that has shaped contemporary Japan and its people
    • Describe Japanese societal practices including education, language, religion, government, business, and art
    • Appreciate the difference and commonality between Japanese and their own culture

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Course orientation: requirements, paper
    • Japan and its geographical data
    • Historical background
    • Society and its value system
    • Education and religion
    • Language and culture
    • Government and politics
    • Business and world relations
    • Art
    • Exam

    Coordinator
    Mark Zimmermann
  
  • SS 415LA - Latin American Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a survey of various aspects of Latin American culture. Through the study of historical, theoretical, and literary texts, plus cinematic and cultural productions, we will address many dimensions of Latin American culture. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geography and natural resources of the region
    • Describe the politics and current affairs of the region
    • Describe characteristics of the region’s art, religion, and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the region’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415N - Native American Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course provides a general overview of American Indian cultures and societies in North America. The course will focus upon examining the rich complexity and diversity of American Indian societies through the study of social structures, political systems, religious beliefs, and cultural practices of various tribal groups. There will be a particular emphasis on Native American oral traditions (e.g., myths, legends, oratory, and songs) and how these reflect the world views of the cultures that created them. Students will also be introduced to the anthropological methods and theories that are used to study American Indian cultures. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the various American Indian tribes that have inhabited and continue to inhabit North America
    • Describe the rich cultural, social, and linguistic differences that characterize aboriginal societies that inhabit the continent
    • Develop an appreciation for how folklore is a key element for understanding the mentalities that are the superstructures of cultures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415P - Polish Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Polish people and culture. It includes such topics as geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geography and natural resources of the country
    • Describe the politics and current affairs of the country
    • Describe characteristics of the nation’s art, religion, and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the country’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Patrick Jung
  
  • SS 415R - Russian Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the Russian people and culture. It includes such topics as geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the geographical and natural resources of the country
    • Describe the politics and current affairs of the country
    • Describe characteristics of the nation’s art, religion, and literature
    • Articulate a basic understanding of the country’s business practices

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Dr. Nadya Shalamova
  
  • SS 415S - Spanish Culture

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide insight into the different Spanish cultures. It will include such topics as the geography, natural resources, historical background, society, politics and current affairs, art, religion, business, literature, and other cultural traditions. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the many different cultures that go under the label “Hispanic”, and have an insight into the interrelationship among these cultures
    • Articulate the location of Spanish-speaking countries and capitals and be able to point them out on a map
    • Describe how the history of Spain and Latin America have an impact on current events in Latin America
    • Explain how U.S. policy impacts on Latin America countries and how we are perceived by the different elements in those countries
    • Describe Hispanic cultural traditions including politics, society, art, religion, business, and literature
    • Gain an appreciation of how an understanding of and familiarity with other cultures may be important and impact their lives and careers

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • One Hundred Years of Solitude discussion
    • Spain and its history
    • Spain today
    • The discovery and Spanish conquest of the Americas
    • The geography of Latin America
    • Colonial Latin America
    • Latin American independence
    • Latin America today
    • The Hispanic in the United States
    • El Norte, an American Playhouse film
    • Cultural traditions including business, art, religion, politics, literature, and society
    • Presentations of cultural topics selected by students

    Coordinator
    Dr. Candela Marini
  
  • SS 453 - American Government

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course is a study of the American governmental system and an analysis of the appropriateness of this system at this time. The challenges to democratic government, the question of constitutional government, the question of individual rights, the question of popular representation, and the question of responsible leadership are the basic topics. The course integrates political science, history, and law to produce a greater awareness and understanding of current affairs. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Describe the broad principles which have shaped American governmental development
    • Explain the basic operation of the U.S. government
    • Recognize the role and complexity of individual rights/responsibilities within the U.S. system

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Political theory
    • American political history
    • Separation of powers
    • Federalism
    • Religious freedom
    • Freedom of speech
    • Freedom of the press
    • Equal rights under the law
    • Citizenship
    • Due process
    • The Presidency
    • The Congress
    • The judiciary
    • Voting and voting patterns

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
  
  • SS 454 - Political Science

    3 lecture hours 0 lab hours 3 credits
    Course Description
    This course will provide basic information concerning the nature and scope of political science; the theory, organization, and characteristics of the state; the forms of government; the philosophy and institutions of democracy; and the processes and functions of modern government. The governments of various nations are compared and contrasted. Students are encouraged to keep themselves informed about current developments in these areas and to develop a critical attitude toward them. (prereq: none) 
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Exhibit objectivity and openness toward political experience
    • Describe the nature of the government, its functioning, and its purpose
    • Exhibit the ability to make more appropriate decisions consistent with the student’s own political needs and the political needs of others

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • Nature of the State
    • Power/authority/legitimacy
    • Evaluation of modern States
    • Political socialization
    • Political ideologies
    • Representation
    • Electoral systems
    • Democracy
    • Legislative functions
    • Executive functions
    • Public opinion
    • Pressure groups/political parties

    Coordinator
    Dr. Katherine Wikoff
 

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