Jun 17, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English as a Second Language

  
  • LS 301 - Upper-Intermediate Academic Listening and Speaking III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Upper-Intermediate Academic Listening and Speaking I core course is the third of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas and built-in academic vocabulary workshops. The listening strand focuses on anecdotes, examples, previewing, taking lecture notes, organization, differences, gist, causes and effects, and timelines. The speaking strand develops critical speaking strategies such as discussing survey results, asking for confirmation, confirming understanding, compromising, asking/giving/refusing permission, correcting misunderstandings, interpreting time periods, giving presentations from lecture notes, and requesting explanations. Exploring implications and consequences, predicting, making connections, inference, using symbols/abbreviations in note-taking, identifying opinions and impressions, thinking creatively, and acquiring and applying background information are critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include listening for meaning of new terms, numerical information and time periods, and forming and expressing opinions. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Speaking

    • Use correct intonation and common English expressions to ask for and give confirmation and clarification, give and refuse permission, and request an explanation
    • Pronounce reduced forms of verbs followed by “to” and questions with -d + you, the phonemes /i/ and /I/, and verbs ending in -ed correctly when speaking
    • Collaborate with a small group to create and present a company and its plan to cope with cultural differences*
    • Prepare and give a 4-6 minute presentation describing what a government should provide its citizens*
    • Compromise and take turns in a small group setting
    • Visit a museum to research and give a 4-6 minute presentation on an artist and your opinion of his or her work using note cards*

    * At least two (2) of these objectives will be met each session

    Academic Listening

    • Recognize reduced forms verbs followed by “to” and questions with -d + you, the difference between the phonemes /i/ and /I/ and /θ/and /s/, and the meaning of interjections from intonation in academic lectures and everyday conversations
    • Use an outline and graphic organizers to organize notes and answer questions from an academic lecture and a radio program
    • Prepare for a lecture by having questions in mind before listening and learning new vocabulary words and phrases
    • Understand the main idea of a lecture by listening to the introduction
    • Listen for and comprehend anecdotes, examples, the meaning of new words and phrases, differences, the gist, numerical information, and time periods from radio broadcasts and academic lectures

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • LS 400 - Academic Listening and Speaking IV

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Listening and Speaking IV is the last in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic listening, speaking, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including anthropology, economics, literature, and ecology. This course enhances students’ understanding of American culture and university life by engaging them in listening to everyday conversations on a college campus as well as authentic academic lectures. They will work to uncover the “mechanics” of speaking and listening by analyzing pronunciation and intonation patterns, as well as common English phrases. Students will actively take place in various types of discourse in class, such as formal and informal small group discussions and presentations. They will also participate in events on campus and in the community where they will further develop their speaking and listening skills. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Listening:

    • Listen for topics, subtopics, and main ideas
    • Listen for details, supporting statistics, quoted material, and points of greater importance
    • Listen for causes, effects, and solutions to problems
    • Understand idioms and slang
    • Take careful lecture notes

    Academic Speaking:

    • Manage a conversation
    • Ask for confirmation
    • Deliver a clearly organized research presentation
    • Narrate a story
    • Clearly pronounce key vowel and consonant sounds

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • LS 401 - Advanced Level Academic Listening and Speaking V

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Advanced Academic Listening and Speaking I core course is the fifth of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas and built-in academic vocabulary workshops. The listening strand focuses on noticing grammar and emotion, idioms/slang, stems/affixes, identifying topic/subtopics in introductions, proverbs, supporting statistics, quoted material and noting the point of greater importance. The speaking strand develops critical speaking strategies such as verbal/nonverbal communication, expressing interest and surprise, opinions, agreement and disagreement, follow-up questions, conversation management, Latin terms, negotiation, asking/offering confirmations and explanations, interrupting techniques, and giving presentations from lecture notes. Inference, educated guesses, predicting exam questions, Internet searches, humor interpretation, solution analysis, and applying information and background knowledge are critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include taking notes, synthesizing information, inferences from attitude and feelings. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Listening

    • Listen for topics, subtopics, and main ideas
    • Listen for details, supporting statistics, quoted material, and points of greater importance
    • Listen for causes, effects, and solutions to problems
    • Understand idioms and slang
    • Take careful lecture notes

    Academic Speaking

    • Give a personal introduction
    • Manage a conversation
    • Clearly pronounce key vowel and consonant sounds YOU struggle with
    • Tell an anecdote
    • Give an academic presentation
    • Lead and participate in an academic discussion

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • LS 500 - Academic Communication Skills

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    In this course, students will further develop their academic listening and speaking skills as they engage in critical thinking and discussions. They will be exposed to listening material in different formats and perspectives as they work toward individual speaking opportunities and group interactions in a variety of formal and informal contexts, such as an encounter with an academic advisor or a panel discussion. Through various structured activities, students will build their academic vocabulary and critical thinking skills, as well as their comprehension of concepts in key academic disciplines.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Listen actively to interviews, lectures, presentations, and panel discussions
    • Identify key facts and details while listening
    • Determine the perspective and purpose of a speaker
    • Refine note-taking skills
    • Identify problems and evaluate arguments
    • Clearly express a need or ask a question to an academic advisor or professor
    • Critique a product or service
    • Research and explain a technical subject
    • Present a project proposal
    • Deliver a well-organized academic presentation with a partner
    • Participate in a panel discussion 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RP 100 - Academic Study Skills

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This is an application course where international students will learn the necessary study skills in order to have a successful experience at the college level. In addition to receiving instruction and practice in basic academic skills (organization, effective study habits, note taking, time management, critical thinking, effective speaking, academic vocabulary), each student will explore their unique learning abilities and will be exposed to strategies to compensate for academic weaknesses. Students will also receive individual assistance and guidance in the work that he/she completes for his/her academic courses, receiving assistance with homework assignments or test preparation, utilizing extended testing time or other accommodations. Does not replace courses in core curriculum. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Effectively manage time in order to complete class assignments
    • Determine an organization strategy to manage work in all classes
    • Recognize the meaning of 48 common testing verbs and respond appropriately when prompted
    • Actively take notes and summarize lectures to demonstrate comprehension of main ideas and important details
    • Respond to questions using appropriate, academic vocabulary
    • Demonstrate time management for essay completion
    • Effectively organize notes and other written information
    • Apply correct sentence structure to written responses and essays
    • Recognize the appropriate essay organization for a writing prompt
    • Increase reading speeds and comprehension of written material
    • Skim and scan compositions for main ideas and pertinent information
    • Record information accurately by taking academic notes while reading
    • Recall vocabulary and important information from readings
    • Review and summarize chapters, articles, and other various compositions
    • Analyze and make conclusions based on information in the readings

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RP 101 - Language Lab

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed help students identify areas they need to work on to improve their academic success, as well as reflect on what they are learning in the classroom.  Students will do an initial self-assessment of their work in their previous term(s), create an individualized improvement plan, and write goals that they will work on for the duration of the class.  They will also get support in connecting with the resources that will help them fulfill their goals. Attendance and active participation are mandatory in this pass/fail class.  (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Recognize areas of needed improvement in English and overall study skills
    • Set personal SMART goals and work independently to achieve them
    • Describe what they have (or have not) learned each week
    • Identify and use resources to help achieve academic success and personal goals

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RP 200 - Application of Strategic Test-Taking Skills

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The course provides an overview of several standardized, global tests which test students’ proficiency in English for entry into university education in the United States. The course will provide an overview of the IELTS, TOEFL, SAT and ACT tests and focus in detail on the IELTS test in particular. As part of the course students will get hands on experience in analyzing each of the components of the tests and learning the strategic skills necessary to perform on them successfully. The core language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing will be taught helping students to identify and practice the specific subskills that the test items focus on. Practice tests will be given for extra practice, apart from practical workbook activities and academic word lists. Students will receive helpful tips and resources available online. Students will be encouraged to identify their goals and increase confidence by developing their test taking skills for attempting these exams. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify personal needs and goals
    • Listening
      • Identify main ideas, specific information, and detail
      • Follow description in diagrams, maps, and plans
      • See beyond the surface meaning
      • Follow signpost words and a talk
    • Speaking
      • Respond to personal question
      • Increase spoken fluency
      • Prepare and give a talk
      • Understand abstract ad analytical questions
    • Reading
      • Become orientated to a text
      • Scan for specific detail
      • Skim for general understanding
      • Identify main and supporting ideas
      • Understand an argument
      • Identify the writer’s views and claims
    • Writing
      • Interpret, describe, and summarize graphic data
      • Plan and present arguments in an essay
      • Link ideas
    • Develop academic vocabulary
    • Notice structure in written English
    • Identify common errors in English 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RP 400 - Research into Academic Field of Study

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    In this elective course, students will independently research their future field of study as their further develop their language skills. Through reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities and projects that revolve around their chosen major, students will gain a deeper understanding about their future profession. They will also begin to develop a specialist vocabulary that will contribute to their success in their university classes.  Students will complete activities online and meet with their professor weekly to discuss their progress on their projects for the quarter.     (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Develop a specialist vocabulary in your future field of study
    • Listen to and take notes on academic lectures
    • Read and report on a book related to your future field of study
    • Research future job prospects and necessary qualifications
    • Create your resume
    • Discuss your progress in learning about your major

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RP 500 - Academic Research Paper

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This is an application core course required for program completion. Students are expected to produce a college-level research paper based on courses taught in North American and European universities. Students develop a thesis statement and supporting ideas, find evidence and plan their work using a formal outline. The writing process provides ample opportunity for editing, guided support, peer feedback and revision.  Finally, students are expected to deliver an academic/professional presentation where significant findings are presented to a selected audience with two evaluators. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Understand and engage in the reasoning and culture of US-style research practices
    • Brainstorm and select a research topic suitable for undergraduate and professional work
    • Focus a topic to the scale of a standard undergraduate research project
    • Find, assess, and maintain a pool of academic print and electronic resources related to research area
    • Craft an arguable thesis that effectively indicates the scope of entire work and allows for concrete development
    • Develop an outline that organizes introductory and background material, major and minor supporting elements, explicit/implicit arguments and counter-arguments, and conclusions, all proceeding from the original intent of the thesis statement
    • Execute various strategies for concise summarizing and accurate paraphrasing
    • Understand the role of quoted material in non-fiction work and be able to effectively incorporate quotations in writing
    • Synthesize borrowed material to support and develop major and minor elements
    • Write a valid research-based paper in accordance with American Psychological Association (APA) style
    • Incorporate citations and references as a result of a firm understanding of intellectual property ideals common to all developed academic communities
    • Recognize and avoid any and all forms of plagiarism
    • Present and defend work to an audience and a small panel of evaluators

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • RW 100 - Academic Reading and Writing I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Reading and Writing I is the first in a four-course sequence designed to develop needed skills in academic reading, writing, vocabulary use and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics such as business, engineering, psychology, health care, or mathematics. This course also enhances students’ understanding of American culture by engaging them in the reading of classic American stories. They will focus on writing well-organized paragraphs using the vocabulary from the units and recognizing the organizational structure of non-fiction, academic texts. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading:

    • Preview the topic of a reading
    • Determine the main idea and important details in a non-fiction text
    • Understand and apply reading skills such as scanning, finding causes and effects, organizing information into charts, asking and answering “Why?” questions, and recognizing the order of events

    Academic Writing and Vocabulary Development:

    • Preview vocabulary words to aid comprehension
    • Deduce meanings of new words by using context clues
    • Utilize the academic word list as a guide to vocabulary development
    • Write organized paragraphs about the topics of the readings using new vocabulary words appropriately

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 200 - Academic Reading and Writing II

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Reading and Writing II is the second in a four-course sequence designed to develop needed skills in academic reading, writing, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including business, biology, and U.S history. This course also enhances students’ understanding of American culture by engaging them in the reading of classic American novels. They will focus on writing well-organized paragraphs alongside recognizing the organizational structure of common academic texts. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading:

    • Guess the meaning of words from context
    • Locate key words
    • Make inferences
    • Form an opinion about a text
    • Find specific support

    Academic Writing and Vocabulary Development:

    • Identify the basic structure of a paragraph
    • Organize a paragraph of process
    • Use transitions of cause, effect, and contrast
    • Write a paragraph of analysis, summary, and compare/contrast

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 201 - Intermediate Academic Reading and Writing I

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Intermediate Academic Reading and Writing I core course is the first of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas with built-in academic vocabulary workshops. The reading strand focuses on guessing meaning from context, parts of speech, dictionary use, recognizing main idea and details, phrases and clauses, punctuation, and connecting with topic sentences and main ideas. The writing strand develops critical writing strategies such as choosing a topic, planning, writing, editing and rewriting descriptive and process paragraphs. Using simple graphic organizers, making inferences, having questions in mind, classifying and applying information are the critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include locating key words, finding grammatical errors, and understanding pronouns. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading

    • Deduce meanings of new words through context
    • Infer meaning of new words through captions and pictures
    • Make inferences about personality and attitude from reading
    • Use punctuation to inform meaning of new vocabulary
    • Formulate critical thinking questions for previewing a text
    • Locate and evaluate topic sentences in text
    • Find definitions of new vocabulary through examples in text
    • Understand the uses of Italics in academic and literary work

    Academic Writing

    • Use a graphic organizer to prepare for writing
    • Write a paragraph about an ideal job
    • Describe an advertisement in using relevant grammatical devices to indicate detail
    • Classify information into groups
    • Stratify main ideas and details into an effective outline
    • Organize and write a concise paragraph detailing a specific process

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 300 - Academic Reading and Writing III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Reading and Writing III is the third in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic reading, writing, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including global business, art, psychology, and health. This course also enhances students’ understanding of American culture by engaging them in the reading of classic American novels. They will focus on writing well-organized paragraphs alongside recognizing the organizational structure of common academic texts. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading:

    • Guess the meaning of words from context
    • Find main ideas, topic sentences, major subtopics, and details
    • Determine point of view
    • Understand connotation

    Academic Writing and Vocabulary Development:

    • Write topic sentences and propositions
    • Write about symbols, advantages, and disadvantages
    • Use subordinating conjunctions and transitions of comparison and contrast
    • Paraphrase and cite your sources
    • Write a paragraph of exposition, analysis, comparison/contrast, summary, and persuasion

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 301 - Intermediate Academic Reading and Writing III

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Upper-Intermediate Academic Reading and Writing I core course is the third of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas with built-in academic vocabulary workshops. The reading strand focuses on punctuation, predicting, finding the main idea and details, previewing, understanding parts of speech, marking a textbook, understanding pictures and captions, finding major sub-topics in main ideas, using opposites, and recognizing different styles of writing. The writing strand develops critical writing strategies such as expository compositions, compositions of analysis, comparison-contrast compositions, cause and effect compositions, and gathering supporting material. Thinking ahead, making inferences, synthesizing and applying information, charts, comparing and contrasting two work samples, determining point of view, identifying causes and effects and finding evidence are critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include finding details, guessing meaning from context, finding errors, editing a test essay, understanding parts of speech, understanding pronouns and applying information. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading 

    • Make inferences from academic and literary texts 
    • Use the punctuation of a sentence to deduce the meaning of new vocabulary
    • Skim a text for main idea and details 
    • Extract and organize ideas from texts in graphic organizers
    • Assess essential and non-essential new vocabulary in reading 
    • Determine an author’s point of view
    • Investigate and differentiate narrative intent in various academic and popular publications
    • Identify cause and effect in reading
    • Find evidence to support a writer’s theory
    • Interpret, summarize, and analyze different types of texts

    Academic Writing 

    • Focus a topic sentence for scope and intent in paragraph writing
    • Write a strong expository paragraph
    • Craft strong analysis in writing 
    • Use graphic organizers to express comparison and contrast
    • Write a strong paragraph of comparison and contrast, incorporating relevant similarities and differences
    • Describe, explain, and illustrate cause and effect in written work
    • Group and synthesize material for written work    

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 400 - Academic Reading and Writing IV

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Academic Reading and Writing IV is the last in a four-course sequence designed to further develop needed skills in academic reading, writing, vocabulary use, and critical thinking, as well as deliver academic strategies to prepare students to be successful in a university setting. Skills and strategies are delivered through content-based instruction with topics including anthropology, economics, literature, and ecology. This course also enhances students’ understanding of American culture by engaging them in the reading of classic American novels. They will focus on writing well-organized paragraphs and essays alongside recognizing the organizational structure of common academic texts. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading:

    • Know which words to focus on
    • Outline main ideas, important details, and examples
    • Use subordinating conjunctions to show differences
    • Evaluate sources

    Academic Writing and Vocabulary Development:

    • Organize a research paper and write a thesis statement
    • Paraphrase, summarize, and use material from a source
    • Choose the right reporting verb and weave in quotations
    • Write a persuasive essay and provide evidence

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 401 - Advanced Academic Reading and Writing V

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    The Advanced Academic Reading and Writing I core course is the fifth of six integrated course sequence that develops needed academic skills within the context of different academic areas with built-in academic vocabulary workshops and research paper foundation. The reading strand focuses on understanding collocations, structure of a research paper, pronoun references, uses of headings, tables, and quotation marks, organizing multiple material sources, and providing definitions to verify understanding. The writing strand develops critical writing strategies such as essays of definition, using materials from a source, brainstorming, paraphrasing, comparison essays, argumentative essays, cause/effect, idea mapping, and providing evidence. Making inferences and connections, outlining, summarizing, comparing, synthesizing, and evaluating sources are critical thinking strategies highlighted in this course. Test-taking strategies skills include taking an essay exam, underlining, defining, summarizing, circling the best choice, taking a side, and finding errors. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Reading

    • Know which words to focus on
    • Outline main ideas, important details, and examples
    • Preview and annotate a text
    • Evaluate sources
    • Use context clues to determining the meaning of new words in a text

    Academic Writing and Vocabulary Development

    • Organize a research paper
    • Paraphrase, summarize and use material from a source
    • Write a paragraph of definition, cause and effect and a summary
    • Choose the right reporting verb and weave in quotations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • RW 500 - Advanced Critical Reading

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    The development of critical reading skills is essential to success in post-secondary academic studies. Advanced Critical Reading is designed to improve upon students’ standard reading skills, such as comprehension and vocabulary development, while concurrently developing their higher-order critical thinking skills. Students will work with authentic texts on a variety of subject matters, taken from academic journals, professional and general-interest magazines, opinion columns, and websites. Working with these texts, they will utilize skills that are fundamental to developing critical awareness. This course also enhances students’ understanding of American culture by engaging them in the reading of classic American novels. This course is required for program completion. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Build an understanding of critical, academic vocabulary
    • Consider place and date of publication
    • Identify author bias and purpose
    • Evaluate the scope of research
    • Distinguish fact from opinion
    • Compare the author’s argument to alternative points of view
    • Evaluate the strength of an argument and the validity of a text
    • Critically review an article
    • Read, analyze, and discuss 1-2 classic American novels

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SM 200 - Foundations of Algebra and the Scientific Method

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course has been deigned to prepare students for studying science and math in an academic English-language setting. Students will develop an ability to perform arithmetical operations while building a working vocabulary of English words and phrases used to describe science and math concepts. They will translate English word problems into solvable operations and equations. They will also develop their analytical and critical thinking skills to find solutions to problems. Finally, students will apply their English and math skills to a scientific context through hands-on experiments and demonstrations. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Apply algebra and the scientific method to questions about physics and chemistry
    • Define English words and phrases used for mathematical problems and scientific terms
    • Translate English word problems into mathematical symbols
    • Perform arithmetic operations without using a calculator
    • Deal with fractions and decimals
    • Calculate averages and percentages
    • Solve algebraic equations
    • Interpret and create graphs based on equations

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SP 100 - Foundations of English Orthography and Conversation

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    This elective course targets the development of skills essential to improving students’ literacy. Students will analyze and apply rules of English orthography (spelling) as they discover and master the use of practical, everyday vocabulary. Students will acquire words to help facilitate conversations on the college campus, such as at the library or in science and math classes. This class will also further refine students’ conversational competence by highlighting strategies that will help them to engage in polite, natural conversations with native English speakers. Emphasis is also given to rhythm, stress, and intonation as well as individual speech sounds that carry important grammatical meaning. Through in- and out-of-class activities, and formal and informal assessments, students will begin to build the foundation for a strong English vocabulary and enhance their conversational skills. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Vocabulary:

    • Identify high-frequency vocabulary words through illustrations and context
    • Apply vocabulary words verbally in an authentic setting
    • Accurately pronounce targeted vocabulary
    • Write with vocabulary in context using word partnerships
    • Develop study skills to review and recall vocabulary words

    Academic Spelling:

    • Recognize spelling patterns in prefixes and suffixes, parts of speech, etc.
    • Make phonetic connections between spelling and pronunciation
    • Identify general common spelling mistakes, as well as individual common spelling mistakes
    • Write using high-frequency vocabulary words with accurate spelling

    Academic Speaking Strategies:

    • Initiate and rejoin a conversation
    • Clarify information and rephrase what someone has said
    • Elicit information
    • Solicit attention
    • Correct someone politely and repair a conversation
    • Summarize a conversation
    • Politely excuse yourself and end a conversation

    Academic Pronunciation:

    • Recognize syllables and rhythm of speech
    • Correctly use stops and continuants with words
    • Pronounce linking sounds correctly
    • Understand and be able to produce word stress patterns
    • Identify emotions and interpret sentence structure from intonation
    • Use basic emphasis patterns in speaking

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • SP 101 - Language Application through Servant Leadership

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This course is designed to allow students to practice their English skills while engaging in and learning about the community they live in. At the beginning of the course students will research different volunteer opportunities and take an active role in contacting community organizations to develop a long-term, group service project. Each week students will volunteer together to make an impact on the community. Examples of service-learning programs include park/community center beautification projects, working at an urban garden, or working at a food pantry. Throughout the course, students will reflect on the impact of their work and their experience in the community as well as work to continuously improve their conversation skills. Attendance and active participation are mandatory in this pass/fail course.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Identify areas to engage with the Milwaukee community
    • Set personal goals and work independently to achieve them
    • Create professional emails/and or have professional phone conversations
    • Engage in meaningful work related to their interests and skills

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SP 102 - American Experience

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    American Experience is an interactive course in which students are exposed to different elements of American culture.  Each course is developed around a theme(s), such as movies, recreational activities, holidays, or food, and each week students will participate in activities related to that theme.  Students will have the chance to further develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in these activities.  They will also grow their English vocabulary and understanding of American culture.  Attendance and active participation are mandatory in this pass/fail course.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Broaden understanding of American culture
    • Apply learned language skills to in and out of class activities
    • Improve every day English vocabulary 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SP 202 - Conversation Strategies

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    This elective is the first of two conversational courses sequence. Students supplement the linguistics and sociolinguistic skills learned throughout the program and apply specific techniques to increase their strategic conversational competence. Students get more information, make comparisons, engage in polite corrections, agree and disagree, summarize, share information, and make decisions in meeting settings. Polite forms, rejoinders, clarifications, follow-up questions, getting a response, expressing probability, interrupting, and avoiding conversation killers are also explored. Emphasis is also given to rhythm, stress, and intonation as well as individual speech sounds that carry important grammatical meaning. Does not replace courses in core curriculum. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Speaking Strategies     

    • Initiate and rejoin a conversation
    • Clarify information and rephrase what someone has said
    • Elicit information
    • Solicit attention
    • Correct someone politely and repair a conversation
    • Summarize a conversation
    • Politely excuse yourself and end a conversation

    Academic Pronunciation

    • Recognize syllables and rhythm of speech
    • Correctly use stops and continuants with words
    • Pronounce linking sounds correctly
    • Understand and be able to produce word stress patterns
    • Identify emotions and interpret sentence structure from intonation
    • Use basic emphasis patterns in speaking

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • SP 203 - Pronunciation Principles

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This elective ESL course will introduce students to the sounds of American English and allow them to develop the necessary skills to be more proficient speakers of the English language. Students will explore a variety of segmental and suprasegmental linguistic components such as pronunciation of vowel and consonant sounds, word and sentence stress, intonation, linking, and elision. Students will gain confidence, understanding, and mastery of words they already know, as well as correctly be able to understand the speaking mechanics of new words and sentences they come across for the first time. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Learn, understand, and produce the American pronunciation of vowels and consonants in words alone and in sentences
    • Understand the difference between voiced and unvoiced sounds, and then appropriately apply them to the sounds of English
    • Correctly pronounce new words as you sight read them
    • Understand and apply syllable stress within words and word stress in sentences
    • Develop increased fluency of sentence speech through development of pronunciation, intonation, and word combination skills
    • Understand more of conversation content from native English speakers through a deeper understanding of reductions, linking, and elision
    • Apply specific sounds and pronunciation strategies to complete a report and presentation of such sounds and strategies as found in an assigned sound clip, speech, or radio broadcast

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SP 205 - Foundations of English Orthography

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits


    Course Description
    Foundations of English Orthography is an elective course which targets the development of skills essential to improving students’ literacy. In this course, students will analyze and apply rules of English orthography (spelling) as they discover and master the use of practical, everyday vocabulary. Students will acquire words to help facilitate conversations on the college campus, such as at the library or in science and math classes. Through in- and out-of-class activities, and formal and informal assessments, students will attain skills which will help build the foundation for the development of a strong English vocabulary. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    Academic Vocabulary

    • Identify high-frequency vocabulary words through illustrations and context
    • Apply vocabulary words verbally in an authentic setting
    • Accurately pronounce targeted vocabulary
    • Write paragraphs with vocabulary in context using word partnerships
    • Develop study skills to review and recall vocabulary words

    Academic Spelling

    • Recognize spelling patterns in prefixes and suffixes, parts of speech, etc.
    • Make phonetic connections between spelling and pronunciation
    • Identify general common spelling mistakes, as well as individual common spelling mistakes
    • Write paragraphs using high-frequency vocabulary words with accurate spelling

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske

  
  • SP 300 - Professional Presentations and Technology

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This elective course is designed to help students understand the components of motivating and successful professional presentations, as well as how to prepare to give an effective presentation. It gives an insight into skills and techniques needed to get a clear and concise point across, target different audiences, incorporate technology effectively, and draft well-crafted opening hooks and closing arguments. Lectures will also focus on the evolution of technology and great speakers of the 21st century. Students will learn how to evaluate themselves and others objectively to give and receive constructive feedback. This course also allows students to do research about their majors, including an important technology used in their future field of study. This course includes a guided tour of the Grohmann Museum’s Man at Work collection.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Prepare, practice, and present two individual presentations
    • Collaborate with 2-3 other students to create and give a group presentation
    • Detect and analyze your strengths and weaknesses as a public speaker
    • Watch and critique the presentations of professionals in various fields
    • Draft an effective opening and closing of a presentation
    • Master strategies to improve your voice power, structure of speech, and body language
    • Use facts and figures and construct clear visual aids to enhance your presentations
    • Uncover and utilize techniques to increase the impact of your presentations
    • Build rapport with an audience, tell stories and lead a question/answer session while giving a presentation
    • Research and present information about your major, including key vocabulary from the field
    • Research information about a form of technology used in your future field of study
    • Give and receive constructive feedback to and from your peers
    • Work effectively with a group

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • SP 500 - Critical Thinking

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    In this 5- or 10-week course, students will spend time developing their language skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and vocabulary while they improve their critical thinking skills.  Units will be designed around a theme, such as current events, technology, or business.  Each unit will begin with a listening and reading activity to engage the students and familiarize themselves with the topic.  They will learn and apply skills to effectively find the audience, main idea and purpose of a text or presentation and write a summary.  They will also present or lead a discussion related to the topic of the unit, in which they will design questions to encourage the critical thinking of their classmates. In each unit, students will also keep track of new vocabulary words in a word journal.   (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Listen for the main ideas and key details in a presentation, talk or lecture
    • Read to find the main ideas and key details in a text
    • Find the purpose, audience, and main idea of a text and a lecture
    • Write an effective summary of a text and a lecture
    • Ask and answer higher-order thinking questions
    • Lead and participate in a small and large group academic discussion
    • Plan and give an academic presentation 

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • TR 202 - Introduction to Primary Research and Data Analysis

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This non-credit course is run by the ESL Program as part of MSOE’s Dual Admission track. This writing-focused class will bridge students’ classroom experiences by exposing them to types of writing tasks that will be expected of them at MSOE. They will look at different types of quantitative and qualitative research and develop the capacity to analyze information as they form research questions and gather data through conducting interviews, surveys, and observations. Students will learn about the scientific method and the basic structure of lab reports, as well has how to answer a question by developing an experiment to test a hypothesis. They will also practice reporting their findings to an audience. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Conduct primary research projects and report on findings in formal reports and presentations.
    • Apply the scientific method to answer a research question by formulating a hypothesis, designing and conducting an experiment, measuring results, and drawing conclusions.
    • Evaluate and employ various methods of field research, including interviews, surveys, and observations.
    • Accurately describe and interpret statistics, graphics, and mathematical operations.
    • Compose an abstract for an academic publication.
    • Write conclusions using language of argumentation and evaluation.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • VC 201 - Vocabulary for Engineering

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This elective class is designed to improve communication skills and specialist English language knowledge in the fields of civil, mechanical and electrical engineering. It emphasizes listening and speaking covering common topics to all engineering fields such as describing how technology works, assessing manufacturing techniques and engineering design. It aids students to describe technical problems and solutions through the study of different case studies in authentic engineering scenarios. It is designed to reinforce concepts in both oral and written contexts. Does not replace courses in core curriculum. (prereq: none)
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Improve your professional communication skills
    • Use and understand high-priority language useful in any branch of engineering
    • Explain how technology works
    • Describe technical functions and applications and emphasize technical advantages of products
    • Create a poster to visually represent and teach information about a material
    • Assess manufacturing and jointing and fixing techniques
    • Follow the steps in the design process to solve an everyday problem
    • Apply learned vocabulary to oral presentations and written explanations
    • Discover vocabulary words related to your major and create a manual to showcase their meanings

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None

    Course Topics
    • None

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
  
  • VC 203 - Professional Vocabulary for Business Management

    0 lecture hours 0 lab hours 0 credits
    Course Description
    This elective class is designed to improve communication skills and specialist English language knowledge in the fields of business management. It offers management vocabulary reference and practice. Emphasizes listening and speaking covering common topics to business fields such as leadership, change management and finance. It aids students to describe technical problems and solutions through the study of different case studies in authentic business scenarios. It is designed to reinforce concepts in both oral and written contexts. Does not replace courses in core curriculum.
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
    • Improve your professional communication skills
    • Use and understand high-priority language useful in business management 
    • Analyze and reflect on technical discussions in a professional context and the developments in technology, global relations and financial practice
    • Work with a team to address real-life business scenarios
    • Write with professional competence a formal email, cover letter, resume, budget, marketing report, and globalization analysis. 
    • Create engaging presentations that target a specific audience which include references to visual aids such as graphs.
    • Assess potential business pitfalls and provide recommendations.

    Prerequisites by Topic
    • None 

    Course Topics
    • Human dimension
    • Quality
    • Competitive strategy
    • Marketing
    • Logistics
    • The Internet and its uses
    • Company finance
    • Boom and bust
    • Corporate responsibility
    • Global economy
    • Intercultural issues
    • Writing in business management

    Coordinator
    Katherine Toske
 

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